Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Buy or DIY a bearing puller for this motor shaft?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Buy or DIY a bearing puller for this motor shaft?

    Bearing in my table saw went, it's over 22 so I guess not like it's been a bad run. Plenty of brush left though. one of the arbor bearings doesn't feel so good, so I'll probably replace those too while the damn thing is torn down.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	bearing.PNG
Views:	330
Size:	269.2 KB
ID:	1867007

    I don't do much shaft & bearing work, what's my best way forward here? I see there's this type out there:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	bearing puller.PNG
Views:	350
Size:	23.4 KB
ID:	1867006
    Amazon is fuqqed right now, so I can't get it till next wed. Is there a good HSM-DIY solution other than a laborious copy of that? Or a non-obvious retailer that would have one? Autozone & HD is a no.

    Should I try heating it with a pencil torch and a little gentle persuasion?
    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

  • #2
    I just had that problem with my table saw arbor. I needed to remove a bearing that was almost tight to the blade flange. There was 1/4" space between them so I took a piece of 1/4" steel plate, hole-sawed a hole the size of the shaft & then cut a path to the hole from one side. The plate was slid behind the bearing & supported on blocks. Then the shaft could be driven out of the bearing. In your case, the plate would have to be wider than the armature to allow its ends to be supported.

    Or you could use a cut off blade in a angle grinder (careful of the shaft).

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
      I just had that problem with my table saw arbor. I needed to remove a bearing that was almost tight to the blade flange. There was 1/4" space between them so I took a piece of 1/4" steel plate, hole-sawed a hole the size of the shaft & then cut a path to the hole from one side. The plate was slid behind the bearing & supported on blocks. Then the shaft could be driven out of the bearing. In your case, the plate would have to be wider than the armature to allow its ends to be supported.

      Or you could use a cut off blade in a angle grinder (careful of the shaft).
      I was thinking of something like that too. So far, getting the bearings out of housings or the 1 bearing I have got off have been trouble, maybe this one and one other that seems like it might be about to go will come easily. I just ordered the new bearings. That was a confusing exercise!
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

      Comment


      • #4
        Nope, tried this setup but no go, not even after I heated it a bit. The tube needs to be that large for the plastic fan on the shaft. I really only have 1/8" clearance to slide in a plate. these 1/8x2 soft carbon steel plates just bent.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	pressing bearing.PNG
Views:	323
Size:	440.1 KB
ID:	1867054
        Location: Jersey City NJ USA

        Comment


        • #5
          1. puller 2. Support behind outer race with 2 plates and press it off. 3. Support it against a plate and shatter outer race with hammer. Don't forget safety glasses. Score inner race in 2 opposite places with cutoff wheel and separate with cold chisel. It won't hurt to nick the shaft a bit since it does not turn in the bearing race. Method depends on what you have to work with and how crude you want to be and how fast it has to get done.

          Comment


          • #6
            Would it be possible to cut two pairs of very shallow, small wedges, such as used for separating jacobs chucks and arbors? I'm thinking of using two opposed wedges together on each side of the bearing.
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

            Comment


            • #7
              In your setup in the drill press put 2 heavier plates at right angles under the 1/8th plates and touching on the commutator. It will be much stiffer.

              Comment


              • #8
                gellfex, your photo is of an overly complex puller. Nearly any simple puller will work, you just have to grind the curved end off the puller jaws. Good pullers will still have plenty of strength left after grinding to remove the bearing. Chinese junk, probably not. I have multiple jaw sets for some pullers, and I've ground down quite a few. None have broken.
                Southwest Utah

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by deltap View Post
                  1. puller 2. Support behind outer race with 2 plates and press it off. 3. Support it against a plate and shatter outer race with hammer. Don't forget safety glasses. Score inner race in 2 opposite places with cutoff wheel and separate with cold chisel. It won't hurt to nick the shaft a bit since it does not turn in the bearing race. Method depends on what you have to work with and how crude you want to be and how fast it has to get done.
                  It may come to the detructive method. I just tried the setup above but with some 1/4" going 90 deg to the 1/8 under them. NG on the press, nor trying a hammer and punch. I wonder if a puller would work anyway. Saw this style, seems pretty fast to try one from a 1-1/2 pipe nipple:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	HQhx2Zk8cwV00BCfj6JztfytjznH2ukr_6Nuv04ADGRzzhXQHvyibLcLg-Fj83OsxtcbuaRkX0wFzZgGhGAyG6_wL6B-hZBUjwJAhPzuKmiJ4zPjzVBNXF_YayCOpUmF0SjifuLu_JfbnuEF7Q.jpg
Views:	315
Size:	74.2 KB
ID:	1867066
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I made something like Bob suggested, though of a much smaller scale
                    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_9368.JPG Views:	0 Size:	80.1 KB ID:	1867068

                    worked beautifully, though again, this was a small motor with a 5mm shaft. The slot is on the other side and I cut a recess around it for the gear to fit into as the original gap between the motor housing and the gear was less than the thickness of the steel (1/4").

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Many auto parts stores will loan out pullers.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        cut off wheel. have that thing off in minutes. many bearings have fallen to my cutoff wheel. diffs, axles, etc. this is why you save the tiny worn wheels, tight work stuff.
                        san jose, ca. usa

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Make a c shaped cut out in the thickest piece you can fit in there.
                          drill and tap 5/16 threads close to bearing 180 degrees apart. Do same pattern on top plate , except through holes for bolts , and a - 1/2 fine thread tapped home between them. Put a end protector on the shaft, bolt the 2 plates together.
                          now insert a - 1/2 fine bolt in the centre hole and tighten hard against the tip protector. Now strike end of bolt with a hammer . 're tighten , repeat.. a few times and it will come off. Face both ends of puller bolt before use.
                          your try with the slim bars and pipe has way too much flex.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Do you frequent a single shop for auto repair? Take it down to Sammi's with the new bearings. He will have all the tools to get the old bearings off and new ones on in less time than it will take for to bodge up a tool.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Take a Dremel with a few 1" zip blades remove outer race and balls,then careful slit iner race parallel with shaft.Take small good quality chisel and tap in from end,bearing will crack at cut.I have removed 100's of bearing this way from 1/4" to 3" bore,larger ones I use a Diegrinder with 2" or 3" zip blades.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X