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Dusting Magnetic Chuck Question

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  • Dusting Magnetic Chuck Question

    A week ago or so I had asked for a recommendation on the best wheel to use to dust this chuck. B&S 6 x 18, older one with the lead segments.
    My grinder takes a 7' x 1/2" wheel. It was always an issue to dress this chuck. A 1/2" wide wheel and the lead segments don't help any.

    I called the CGW tech today and he recommended that I use a 7" x 1" wheel with a center recess. His theory is that a 1" wide wheel will will cover the width of the chuck with less passes than the 1/2" wide wheel. He also gave me his recommendation on hardness and grain structure of the wheel.

    I'm just wonder what you guys think?? I've never ran this grinder with anything other than a 1/2" wide wheel or cup wheel for special jobs.

    https://www.kbctools.com/itemdetail/1-595-59003



    JL...................

  • #2
    We used to use a 46J 1/2 inch full diameter wheel 7-1/2 or even 8 inches. Harder wheel for softer materials.

    We took the diamond dressing nib and 1st cut a groove in the center of the wheel. Then we dressed the wheel with
    one of those cluster nubs with a matrix of fine diamonds. It’s like having a lead wheel and a follow up wheel in one.

    Very light cuts with the chuck coated with kerosene, WD-40 or at times even Safety- Kleen liquid.
    It just seemed to keep the wheel from loading up.

    Back in those days (‘76 >’83) we dressed our chucks each new season on the five grinders we had. The B&S Chuck was not
    a favorite. We used Norton wheels. I’ve since moved over to Camel and Carborundum.

    One day we were on afternoon break at our benches with a hellacious storm blowing outside. The wind ripped the main power lines off the
    building. At some point the phases got reversed and 4 grinding wheels exploded simultaneously 10 feet to our left. 😱
    We did A LOT of chuck grinding those next few days.
    Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
    9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

    Comment


    • #3
      Tim, the 46 grit J is what the tech at CGW recommended. I've always had really good luck with those CGW Ruby wheels.
      My concern here is that I've never put a one inch wide wheel on my grinder. The center of the wheel is recessed I would imagine specifically for the purpose of putting it on a grinder that takes a half inch wheel.
      I'm not sure if the cover will fit, but that's not a big deal.

      JL.......

      Comment


      • #4
        When I dressed a chuck I would always relieve the lead spacers. I used a piece of drill rod and ground an angle as a cutting edge. Sort of spooned the lead out.
        John

        Comment


        • #5
          Solly, I didnt read the other posts.

          I would go for the widest wheel you can support and a very hard wheel with fine grit (subjective). And I would spin fast shallow.

          Dry I assume? A vac and whatever else to keep the dust from reintroducing.

          Oh, are you doing it wet? Is it a completely cleaned out tank with new fluid? If not you will have grains of old cuttings in between the wheel and mag.

          Do it dry. JR

          Comment


          • #6
            Very light cuts a little less width step over than the wheel width. I always used a red magic marker to put some lines on the chuck so I could see how much it was cleaning up. Wet is better but dry will work. It will just take a little more dressing the wheel. A wider wheel may be a good idea if you have one handy.
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

            Comment


            • #7
              More of the wheel in contact means more heat. Wheel loading is a problem with grinding a chuck but it's the heat that will screw up the job. Doesn't take too much to end up with a chuck that is dished with a few tenths low spot in the middle. I would vote against the wide wheel.
              George
              Traverse City, MI

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tim The Grim View Post
                We used to use a 46J 1/2 inch full diameter wheel 7-1/2 or even 8 inches. Harder wheel for softer materials.

                We took the diamond dressing nib and 1st cut a groove in the center of the wheel. Then we dressed the wheel with
                one of those cluster nubs with a matrix of fine diamonds. It’s like having a lead wheel and a follow up wheel in one.

                Very light cuts with the chuck coated with kerosene, WD-40 or at times even Safety- Kleen liquid.
                It just seemed to keep the wheel from loading up.

                Back in those days (‘76 >’83) we dressed our chucks each new season on the five grinders we had. The B&S Chuck was not
                a favorite. We used Norton wheels. I’ve since moved over to Camel and Carborundum.

                One day we were on afternoon break at our benches with a hellacious storm blowing outside. The wind ripped the main power lines off the
                building. At some point the phases got reversed and 4 grinding wheels exploded simultaneously 10 feet to our left. 😱
                We did A LOT of chuck grinding those next few days.

                I noticed in your post you said you are now using some Camel wheels. Several years ago I added a Sanford grinder to my shop. It came with some Carborundum and Norton wheels. When I needed some new wheels I tried Camel brand. Unfortunately I was disappointed. A couple were way out of balance, and a third literally wobbled on the spindle. I sent them back and replaced them with Norton wheels.

                Since then I have stuck with Norton and Carborundum with no problems. I'm wondering if you have had any problems with the Camel wheels, or whether I just happened to get a bad batch? Camel wheels do seem to generally be less expensive, but quality may be the reason.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by projectnut View Post


                  I noticed in your post you said you are now using some Camel wheels. Several years ago I added a Sanford grinder to my shop. It came with some Carborundum and Norton wheels. When I needed some new wheels I tried Camel brand. Unfortunately I was disappointed. A couple were way out of balance, and a third literally wobbled on the spindle. I sent them back and replaced them with Norton wheels.

                  Since then I have stuck with Norton and Carborundum with no problems. I'm wondering if you have had any problems with the Camel wheels, or whether I just happened to get a bad batch? Camel wheels do seem to generally be less expensive, but quality may be the reason.
                  100%, do not like the camel wheels, never got the finish I wanted and had another arrive with a huge imbalance. Agree on Norton and Carborundum.

                  Last edited by Mcgyver; 04-17-2020, 10:34 AM.
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by camperkn View Post
                    When I dressed a chuck I would always relieve the lead spacers. I used a piece of drill rod and ground an angle as a cutting edge. Sort of spooned the lead out.
                    John
                    I have thought of doing that but feared I may dig too deep and then every segment will be a catch point.

                    JL...............

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                      Solly, I didnt read the other posts.

                      I would go for the widest wheel you can support and a very hard wheel with fine grit (subjective). And I would spin fast shallow.

                      Dry I assume? A vac and whatever else to keep the dust from reintroducing.

                      Oh, are you doing it wet? Is it a completely cleaned out tank with new fluid? If not you will have grains of old cuttings in between the wheel and mag.

                      Do it dry. JR
                      I plan on using a mister.

                      JL...................

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
                        More of the wheel in contact means more heat. Wheel loading is a problem with grinding a chuck but it's the heat that will screw up the job. Doesn't take too much to end up with a chuck that is dished with a few tenths low spot in the middle. I would vote against the wide wheel.
                        There are pro's and con's to that too. The tech said since I was removing a tenth or less per pass that it shouldn't be a problem.

                        JL....................
                        Last edited by JoeLee; 04-17-2020, 03:21 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by projectnut View Post


                          I noticed in your post you said you are now using some Camel wheels. Several years ago I added a Sanford grinder to my shop. It came with some Carborundum and Norton wheels. When I needed some new wheels I tried Camel brand. Unfortunately I was disappointed. A couple were way out of balance, and a third literally wobbled on the spindle. I sent them back and replaced them with Norton wheels.

                          Since then I have stuck with Norton and Carborundum with no problems. I'm wondering if you have had any problems with the Camel wheels, or whether I just happened to get a bad batch? Camel wheels do seem to generally be less expensive, but quality may be the reason.
                          I know that Norton has been considered the top quality above all other brands, but I have bought a few of their wheels that were out of balance as much or more than other brands.
                          I have one that has some wicked side wobble in it. I remember calling them about it and the tech said it won't hurt anything.

                          I have had pretty good luck with Triumph and CGW.

                          JL...................

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                            Thee are pro's and con's to that too. The tech said since I was removing a tenth or less per pass that it shouldn't be a problem.

                            JL....................
                            How many chucks has the tech ground in?
                            George
                            Traverse City, MI

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post

                              How many chucks has the tech ground in?
                              I have no idea, probably reading off his cheat sheet.

                              Norton recommended this one........... 662529018142

                              JL....................
                              Last edited by JoeLee; 04-17-2020, 12:07 PM.

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