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Open the screw hole in carbide inserts?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    Pin and clamp would be easy to make, remember, the clamping does not have to be very strong, the cutting forces hold the insert down.
    What is a suitable material for a holder? Mild steel OK?
    Thanks

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    • #32
      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

      Folks over PM identified the type (T322P) already: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...nation-360534/

      Apparently it is some historic Kennametal speciality
      Yes I did post there in a thread I didn't start. Carbide Bob was offering information.
      I am always anxious posting on PM because I am far from a pro and I have been told that 😁 on PM. I'm not bitching as I appreciate many on that site. A few I don't iykwim.
      These are boring inserts. I plan on using them for turning OD. Is that a mistake? What would be the biggest consideration when using a boring insert for turning OD?

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      • #33
        I have made some insert tooling out of keysteel, but mild steel would probably work if you are not in the habit of taking huge cuts. I doubt if you will notice the difference between boring and turning inserts in a home shop environment. The biggest differences you will experience is by trying out different grades of the same size and type of insert. Your old Kennametal inserts will be great for some types of steel and rubbish for others, you need to remember which for later reference.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by old mart View Post
          I have made some insert tooling out of keysteel, but mild steel would probably work if you are not in the habit of taking huge cuts. I doubt if you will notice the difference between boring and turning inserts in a home shop environment. The biggest differences you will experience is by trying out different grades of the same size and type of insert. Your old Kennametal inserts will be great for some types of steel and rubbish for others, you need to remember which for later reference.
          What steel is keystock typically?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by old mart View Post
            Pin and clamp would be easy to make, remember, the clamping does not have to be very strong, the cutting forces hold the insert down.
            What type of clamp?

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            • #36
              If you are going to make a holder from scratch, then just use a 3.5mm screw. If you make the tool long enough, it can be double ended for left and right hand cutting. Use the insert snugged up in the seating as a drill guide to line it up, but before drilling, remove the insert and move the hole position 0.005" towards the shoulders of the seating. This pulls the insert tightly into the tool as the screw is tightened. Just use some mild steel for a first tool.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by challenger View Post

                What steel is keystock typically?
                usually 1045.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by dian View Post

                  usually 1045.
                  I just bough a 1/2 stick of 1018. It will be good enough I'm sure.

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