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Work holding and Tooling Holders you have Shop Built

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  • Bented
    replied
    More work holding, part off commercial food product extrusion nozzles.
    They are drawn stainless about .035" thick, original part on the right.

    Turned a mandrel with the taper and radius and a cap that was pushed onto it by the tail stock with the taper and radius on the inside, the only thing holding them is friction, 70+ parts and it worked a charm.
    If I had to run 700 parts I would have made the tools from steel rather than aluminum.

    Last edited by Bented; 05-14-2020, 05:47 PM.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    You're trying to make the rest of us envious.... And it's working! 😀

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  • thaiguzzi
    replied
    Gettin cut...
    Click image for larger version

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    Cut;
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    Drilled, tapped, de-burred...
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    Finished and blacked;
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  • thaiguzzi
    replied
    Re Mcgyver's post #25;

    Click image for larger version  Name:	june - nov 2014 052.JPG Views:	0 Size:	1.60 MB ID:	1874154
    Nasty flame cut steel, enough for 10 blanks...

    Click image for larger version  Name:	june - nov 2014 068.JPG Views:	0 Size:	1.61 MB ID:	1874155
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    gettin' there...
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    Nearly done...
    Click image for larger version  Name:	june - nov 2014 144.JPG Views:	0 Size:	1.61 MB ID:	1874157

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  • thaiguzzi
    replied
    Originally posted by Ian B View Post
    Thaiguzzi, Handy looking shaper table extension plate. Is it for mounting some kind of dividing head & tailstock? If it's for mounting shafts along the axis of the ram, it's handy to check to see if your shaper has a hole all the way through from front to back, allowing it to "swallow" shafts - only obvious if you look under the ram. Do you have any kind of support bracket beneath it, or just rely on the rigidity of 7/8" plate? Ian
    Yes, used for my Vertex 6" HV Rotab and tailstock, and also a BIG capacity vise i have.
    Yes, the hole is there, its an 8" Boxford.
    I was going to support underneath to the box table, but the thing is so goddam rigid as is, nothing moves.
    Also, by design, most work with the Rotab is light cuts (gear cutting, engraving etc) and the work piece is generally not far off from the box area.

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    TTT, nice job and results with the boring bar on the jaws. With the impact of the interrupted cut how do you think it would handle a tapering cut that started at .001 to start on full size but tensioned jaws?
    Not sure on full size cut as I left Bolt on Jaws off just in case I came across another Chuck to possible make use of them,Jaws were tensioned.My boring bar was extended enough at 2-1/4" so could have done both.The Kennametal insert was the same ones I used to Machine 65 sockets for my Arbour Press.

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  • Bented
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    Cathode ray tube? There is one just showing in the second picture. I assume the speed is kept very low with that ammount of jaw overhang.
    I tried 1200 RPM's at first but the chips got out of hand and the stock glued itself to the tool, ran them with flood coolant which made for more consistent diameters and a better finish but the chips really became an issue, settled on 750 RPM's dry.
    Part drawing.

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  • Bented
    replied
    Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post

    That's impressive how did you true Jaws that long,what's CRT?
    Cathode Ray Tube, a sure sign that a machine is 20+ years old. This is a Bridgeport control produced in the mid 90's, a 10" diagonal CRT that will replace it in its original position is well over $500.00. These controls use the VGA standard and connectors, get a $10.00 cord and a $90.00 fifteen inch flat screen monitor, plug it in and you are back in business.

    Each jaw has a tapped hole in the end, make a ring with corresponding holes and screw it to the ends of the jaws, tighten the scroll and bore them through the center.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    TTT, nice job and results with the boring bar on the jaws. With the impact of the interrupted cut how do you think it would handle a tapering cut that started at .001 to start on full size but tensioned jaws?

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  • old mart
    replied
    A mention was made of the possibility of using boring rather than grinding for truing chuck jaws. Possible, but the interrupted cut would put most people off. I succeeded with a variation of this. The museums Smart & Brown model A has a quantity of collets which fit into the spindle. Most were in poor condition in their bores. Not having any sort of tiny grinder, or even thinking of one at the time, I successfully bored the common sizes, 5/16",3/8",1/2", 5/8" and 3/4", plus 8,10,12,16 and 20mm. I used a solid carbide 6mm Garant bar with their own brand inserts which are tiny, but excellent quality. I got the bar cheap on ebay, but had to pay the full price for the inserts which are proprietry, something like DCCT 04 with a 1.8mm screw.
    It would be worth experimenting with an old chuck and a very stiff boring setup.

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  • old mart
    replied
    Cathode ray tube? There is one just showing in the second picture. I assume the speed is kept very low with that ammount of jaw overhang.

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by Bented View Post
    Welded then turned soft jaws for 4 1/2" diameter X 10" long ABS tubes, 3500 parts so far without problems.
    An old lathe with a CRT (-:

    That's impressive how did you true Jaws that long,what's CRT?

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  • Bented
    replied
    Welded then turned soft jaws for 4 1/2" diameter X 10" long ABS tubes, 3500 parts so far without problems.
    An old lathe with a CRT (-:

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post

    You open up all sorts of ideas for me with that. The big problem as I see it off the top of my head is that we don't really want to remove much material. Ideally we would only remove enough that the whole length of the edges are brought out to match the spot with the most wear. And generally that is only a piddling .002'ish at most.

    I'd have to recheck but I seem to recall that a piece of 7/8 drill rod I have here was deflecting about .005'ish at a couple of inches out from the jaws. so .003ish at the end of the jaws. And given how the three jaw geometry works probably only .002 or a bit less of actual runout. One thing I've read about many inserts is that they do not like to work with removing very small amounts. But kissing that much away with even a small grinding stone isn't so bad. And the .002 is just at the very back of the jaws. UP at the front it's going to have to start from nothing and shave away an increasing ramp.

    If there is an insert out there that would be happy with this sort of small cut from zero to roughly .002 and would not immediately chip away the edge then I suspect that it might work out.

    Mcgyver, I like the use of the silver soldering or brazing you used. From the delicate look of it I'm thinking it's silver solder? A nice option for such assemblies where welding would introduce a lot of added shrink stresses. I think we don't use the idea of silver soldering for this sort of thing often enough in our projects. At least I know that I sure don't.
    I don't remember exactly how much I removed but it was lot's 12-15 thou and only did Master Jaws.Will not be using Bolt On Jaws as this Chuck will go on Back End of Spindle Bore of Lathe for holding longer stock.This 8" Bison with all matching # showed extreme wear on Master Jaws way more than Bolt On Jaws.My guess it was used a lot with only Master Jaws installed,it came in a Box of Auction Goodies so history is unknown.I used 5/8" Kennametal bar with inserts for interrupted Cutting,started by taking a few 1 thou cuts and ended up taking 2 thou cuts was happy with finish.The Insert in Pic is the one that did the job. Click image for larger version

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post

    Trying to figure out an easy way to load the jaws while leaving the jaws open to roughly 1" is where I'm at just now. Curvature of the edge seems to be 1" or 25mm from matching it against washers and such. And the stone I want to use is 1" so that's a happy accident.

    But it means the jaws need to be quite a ways opened.

    I'll do a thread on the job of it's own when the time comes.
    You might try the ring method.

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