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110v/220v single phase,,,,whats the difference???

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  • #16
    Originally posted by danlb View Post
    Ringo: Home depot has them down to .5 amps. HD has a huge range of them available, up to 225amps. You can get 5, 10, 15 and 20 amps as well as a lot more. The breaker protects the wiring, so if the wiring can handle the load from a mill, lathe and table saw, then there is no reason that you can't do it.

    Dan
    I Have no idea what Dan is referring to, but evidently not breakers for 220V.

    I went through every listing they have, and there is not a single branch circuit breaker under 15A in a double pole suitable for a standard breaker box. Double pole linked is required for 220V.

    They DO have DIN rail mounted breakers for use in equipment down to 0.5A, but that is a different animal from a branch circuit breaker.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Ringo View Post
      well then if 15 or 20 amp is the smallest 220v breaker, you could run your 1/2hp lathe, your 3/4hp mill, plus a table saw on that one breaker circuit???
      Sure.. You just have to be smart about it. Most code would allow up to 80% load on a circuit, so you shouldn't have more than 16amps of load at a time on a 20amp circuit.

      You wouldn't want to be running your lathe and a pump on a circuit, then have the air compressor kick in and pop the breaker if the total load exceeds capacity. Run the numbers and have a plan.

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      • #18
        you could run your 1/2hp lathe, your 3/4hp mill, plus a table saw on that one breaker circuit???
        In a single person shop you are not going to be running these all at the same time. Generally, the codes recognize this, and in a detached workshop will allow you to install capacity less than what would actually be required if you were really going to run them all at once. Note that I'm referring the service line to, and panel in the shop, not whether the outlets themselves are 120 or 240, or the amperage of the breakers in each branch circuit.
        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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        • #19
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

          I Have no idea what Dan is referring to, but evidently not breakers for 220V.

          I went through every listing they have, and there is not a single branch circuit breaker under 15A in a double pole suitable for a standard breaker box. Double pole linked is required for 220V.

          They DO have DIN rail mounted breakers for use in equipment down to 0.5A, but that is a different animal from a branch circuit breaker.
          The DIN rail breakers are certified to either UL 489 or UL 1077. The UL 489 are suitable for branch circuit protection (and are
          more costly than the UL 1077 because of that). Usually available in a wide range of amperages as Dan mentioned.
          Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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          • #20
            DIN breakers are irrelevant to this topic.
            We are discussing household power boxes, not DIN.
            the smallest household variety 220v breaker thus far known is 15amp, 2-pole 220v.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Tom S View Post

              The DIN rail breakers are certified to either UL 489 or UL 1077. The UL 489 are suitable for branch circuit protection (and are
              more costly than the UL 1077 because of that). Usually available in a wide range of amperages as Dan mentioned.
              They do not fit regular US style service boxes, and are really better suited for use inside equipment. As Ringo says, irrelevant here, and, apparently not in-stock many places, which is no surprise.

              Apparently some other countries do use that style in service boxes, as witness the pics from Dian , in Switzerland, showing what appears to be DIN rail breakers.

              I do not know that it would be impossible to use them in the US, they fulfill the basic NEC requirement of being listed for that use, but as a practical matter they are not a consideration.

              Last edited by J Tiers; 05-02-2020, 09:37 PM.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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