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  • garyhlucas
    replied
    Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post

    Yep, can't forget that mistake – I'm reminded about it every time I see the surcharge for paying off the disaster on my septic tank pump-out bill.

    Besides forgetting to properly tie in the roof of the tank to the walls, the entire plant was built with a much too optimistic view of future growth and we still haven't reached the level of users required to make a plant this size viable so the city and county have continued to have to toss money at it.
    Sorry to hear that George. I got involved because our equipment didn't work as well. However I was able to solve the problems in another plant in Maryland and then went around fixing them. I fixed another one at Eastbrook near Grand Rapids. The engineering firm was responsible for lots of the problems and unfortunately I have never seen one take responsibility yet. Somehow we always wound up fixing the problems on our dime.

    However at my last job we built packaged plants delivered on site ready to run and we selected everything from controls to pumps, valves, tanks, blowers and piping. WAY less problems than letting an engineering firm select a bunch of parts that don't work together and telling us to put them together and make them work.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyhlucas
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    It's been long, long gone, like before WW2. There were several apparently. How long ago were you there? Hoboken's changed and built up a lot in the last 30 years, and Stevens too. I bet there's a LOT more girls there than when you went! I see them all over town. But from a local's POV Stevens is right on the river at Castle Point, the opposite side of town from the bottom of the cliff. I guess everything is relative.
    My class was the first to admit women, 16 of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • OaklandGB
    replied
    In my life time I've seen the Rouge Complex go from raw materials in, with fully finished automobiles driving out.
    Except for tires and cloth materials, there were no imported parts or assemblies from anywhere, let alone from foreign sources. Steel was made from ore delivered by boat from the iron mines in Michigan and Minnesota. Also a huge rail yard.
    It is but a shadow of what it once was. Sad.


    Attached Files

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  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Here's a better video of the beast.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl-9NZVL27w

    Leave a comment:


  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    Wait, what are we seeing here? Are there tracks under there that the treaded engine is clearing for the cargo cars, or is it a giant steam snowmobile and those cars sleds or something?
    Here's what you are seeing. Interesting contraption!

    https://progress-is-fine.blogspot.co...og-hauler.html

    Leave a comment:


  • George Bulliss
    replied
    Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post

    George,
    When I worked for a membrane treatment company I visited the sludge processing plant we built in Traverse City. You know the one I'll bet. Shortly after construction the side of a 250,000 gallon concrete tank collapsed and dumped all the sludge fortunately right into a storm water holding pond! It was two more years before we went back to finish the job.
    Yep, can't forget that mistake – I'm reminded about it every time I see the surcharge for paying off the disaster on my septic tank pump-out bill.

    Besides forgetting to properly tie in the roof of the tank to the walls, the entire plant was built with a much too optimistic view of future growth and we still haven't reached the level of users required to make a plant this size viable so the city and county have continued to have to toss money at it.

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by dalee100 View Post
    Hi,

    The nearest town to me has a population of 200. Our 2020 Graduating Class is 9 Seniors. Up here, logging is still king. Followed by farming and trucking.

    Here is an early photo you guys might like. A steam engine rocking tracks in the snow.
    http://
    Wait, what are we seeing here? Are there tracks under there that the treaded engine is clearing for the cargo cars, or is it a giant steam snowmobile and those cars sleds or something?

    Leave a comment:


  • dalee100
    replied
    Hi,

    The nearest town to me has a population of 200. Our 2020 Graduating Class is 9 Seniors. Up here, logging is still king. Followed by farming and trucking.

    Here is an early photo you guys might like. A steam engine rocking tracks in the snow.
    http://

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post

    I went to Stevens in Hoboken. Never saw that lift, but Stevens sat right up on the edge of the Palisades.
    It's been long, long gone, like before WW2. There were several apparently. How long ago were you there? Hoboken's changed and built up a lot in the last 30 years, and Stevens too. I bet there's a LOT more girls there than when you went! I see them all over town. But from a local's POV Stevens is right on the river at Castle Point, the opposite side of town from the bottom of the cliff. I guess everything is relative.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyhlucas
    replied
    Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
    Just saw that our town will be 125 years old this month. It didn't start due to the railroad; it was water and timber. A river that reached deep into the stands of virgin white pine and a protected (mostly) bay to serve the ships that carried the boards and products away.

    The first industries were all related to the logging.


    This photo shows the reservoir of the Boardman river that the basket factory was on and both east and west bays. My office sits near the right side of the airport, just across the street from runway 28/10. Been a while since I've seen the office though, currently holed up at home about 17 miles to the west (left) of town.
    George,
    When I worked for a membrane treatment company I visited the sludge processing plant we built in Traverse City. You know the one I'll bet. Shortly after construction the side of a 250,000 gallon concrete tank collapsed and dumped all the sludge fortunately right into a storm water holding pond! It was two more years before we went back to finish the job.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyhlucas
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post
    Yeah, my little town had a rail line or 2 also! The left 2/3 of the pic is now Liberty State Park. All the rail freight going to NYC and Long Island came to Jersey City and was barged across.

    Click image for larger version

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    Sorta rail, a funicular up the Palisades in Hoboken.
    I went to Stevens in Hoboken. Never saw that lift, but Stevens sat right up on the edge of the Palisades.

    Leave a comment:


  • AD5MB
    replied
    the house I grew up in is in that picture of TC above. most of the housing was not there when I left in '73.

    Leave a comment:


  • jmm03
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    Neat. During the early 70's I lived in Byram Township in the community of Forest Lakes. The name says it all. What a great place. They used to do ice racing on the lake in the winter.

    Ima-fraid to do a google earth, wont be the same. JR

    Oops! Before the net police get one me

    I lived in the community of Forest Lakes, in Byram Township. JR
    Not far from me originally, Lake Hopatcong

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Originally posted by Tom S View Post

    You're looking more for the Paris to Brantford stretch, which has been designated 'exceptional waters' with special regulations to preserve the smallmouth fishery. That's the section of water the guides will float. South of Brantford the water begins to get very silty (as it enters the clay plains), and while Caledonia to Cayuga is some beautiful water with decent fishing if you're making the trip stay a bit more to the north.
    Great information Tom, thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom S
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    I wish the kids were older, as you're making me want to do it right now. . I'm only vaguely familiar with the section from Caledonia to Cayuga and only from the road, but it looks like it would be a fantastic trip via canoe with a fly rod.
    You're looking more for the Paris to Brantford stretch, which has been designated 'exceptional waters' with special regulations to preserve the smallmouth fishery. That's the section of water the guides will float. South of Brantford the water begins to get very silty (as it enters the clay plains), and while Caledonia to Cayuga is some beautiful water with decent fishing if you're making the trip stay a bit more to the north.

    Leave a comment:

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