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where is all the videos,,,,AC,,,, stick welding,,,buzzbox ???

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  • #16
    Another viewpoint from long ago: http://chaski.org/homemachinist/viewtopic.php?t=86884

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    • #17
      AC is not really "old school", DC welding goes back to the 1880s and C L Coffin's 1890 or so patent on stick welding.... All DC at that time.

      Originally posted by Ringo View Post

      Where does the rectifier bridge go?
      put it in the input side of power, or,
      put it at the transformer output?
      Transformer output!!!!!
      Last edited by J Tiers; 05-07-2020, 11:11 AM.
      CNC machines only go through the motions.

      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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      • #18
        I've seen YouTube videos about making an AC buzz box into a DC welder but the dude said it never did very well for him? Will that rectifier hold up to a fair amount of continuous welding?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by challenger View Post
          I've seen YouTube videos about making an AC buzz box into a DC welder but the dude said it never did very well for him? Will that rectifier hold up to a fair amount of continuous welding?
          With a big enough heat sink/fan, yeah it can be done. But its probably better to just buy a DC machine, or a combination machine.
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • #20
            I think it bares mentioning that for a quality conversion from an AC only machine to DC one should include a capacitor bank as well as some form of inductance.
            In order to be truly happy with the quality of the arc these features are must haves, otherwise may as well stay with AC only. While DC does offer a lot of options, most folks will be very well served with an AC only machine for general home hobbist/general maintenance applications.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #21
              The first two numbers in the rod number only indicate the composition of the filler metal not its suitability for any process. The last two numbers indicate flux composition and suitable positions. For example 6010 is dc only while 6011 is ac or dc. 6011 is a deep penetrating fast freeze rod while 6013 is shallow penetrating. 6011 for structural 6013 for sheet metal. All the information is readily available to choose the right rod for the job
              one example
              https://weldguru.com/welding-electrode/
              Last edited by Captain K; 05-07-2020, 01:43 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                AC you can run anything 60xx,
                6010 has entered the chat.

                Originally posted by enginuity View Post
                What Doozer said.

                6013 is called farmer rod for a reason. Grab some 6013 and start welding with your buzz box.

                Beginner welding is all about practice practice practice. Videos are ok, but you just need to start practicing.
                Isn't it technically 6011 that is considered farmer rod?

                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                AC is not really "old school", DC welding goes back to the 1880s and C L Coffin's 1890 or so patent on stick welding.... All DC at that time.

                Transformer output!!!!!
                It would be rather tricky to wire a multitap transformer to a rectifier no?
                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                • #23
                  So, do I ignore all the discussion about DC?
                  Not at all! AC is the same as DC for every half cycle, so you just do as you would for straight polarity, then as if for reverse polarity, and change your technique 120 times second!
                  "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                  • #24
                    Ringo, if you do buy a rectifier bridge and heatsink due to the individual output plugs for different current levels you cannot put your rectifier inside the case. Instead it will need to be set up as an outboard plug in DC conversion and then you plug the welding leads into the DC box.

                    A lot of buzz box welders use a variable transformer setup to alter the current from just the one winding. From the look of all the connectors on the front of yours you've got a basic transformer with multiple secondary taps. So you can't put the rectifier inside the box other than on only one tap. And thus the reason for the external box.

                    I'm no hotshot welder either. I smile knowingly when I accidentally run a bead with no obvious issues. But the DC welding videos are still useful as lessons on rod manipulation.

                    I shifted away from 6013 to 7018 as much for the easier flux slag removal as anything. Plus 6013 spatters a lot more so a lot more cleanup of the little metal balls stuck to everything. But 6013 did seem easier to use in terms of getting into the metal. Just a bear to remove the slag.
                    Last edited by BCRider; 05-07-2020, 01:59 PM.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by enginuity View Post
                      What Doozer said.

                      6013 is called farmer rod for a reason. Grab some 6013 and start welding with your buzz box.

                      Beginner welding is all about practice practice practice. Videos are ok, but you just need to start practicing.
                      I'm a farmer and have used 6013 for lighter material preferably vertical doing down hand hot and fast.

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                      • #26
                        If 6013 is for lighter material, then how light is light?
                        how heavy is heavy?
                        So far, I got 3/32 & 1/8 6013 for 5" channel and 1 3/4 x 3/16 angle
                        also have a little 7018ac 1/8

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                          If 6013 is for lighter material, then how light is light?
                          how heavy is heavy?
                          So far, I got 3/32 & 1/8 6013 for 5" channel and 1 3/4 x 3/16 angle
                          also have a little 7018ac 1/8
                          I've gone as light as 12ga plate (about 1/8") with 1/8 6013 and haul a$$ with the rod. So it doesn't burn a hole. The 3/32 stuff you have is good for sheetmetal, it would make that job easy. For the channel and angle I would be OK with the 1/8 stuff, maybe pay a bit closer attention on the lighter angle. Wouldn't even have to bevel it.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • #28
                            This is largely where practice comes in for picking the rod for the material. But for myself I use 3/32 for 1/8 and up.

                            For a heavier job I did with some 3/4 rod to some 1/2" plate I "V"ed the edge of the plate and ran three passes of the 3/32 on each side. So far the targets have not broken despite heavy use during matches at my shooting range. So I think I did OK with this. But clearly 1/8 would have been a better option there or even 5/32.

                            For sheet metal down to 1/16 I think I'd want to get some 1/16 rod. Although I think a good welder would be able to drop down maybe 3 to 5 amps and run a faster pass which didn't burn through. That's not me though. Hell, I still burn through 1/8 on far too regular a basis even with the 3/32. I really need to learn to keep it moving better to avoid that.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by challenger View Post
                              I've seen YouTube videos about making an AC buzz box into a DC welder but the dude said it never did very well for him? Will that rectifier hold up to a fair amount of continuous welding?
                              Yes, and here's the deal, unless it's a motor driven generator set or a modern inverter, ALL plug in transformer welders are AC. The DC and ones that do AC/DC are just AC machines, with a rectifier added.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                                … Transformer output!!!!!
                                It took Jerry 7 minutes to answer the rectifier question.
                                I believe he felt a disturbance in the force and would have answered sooner,
                                but maybe he was on the can or something.

                                -Doozer

                                DZER

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