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Question on wiring 2 hp, 1 phase, 230V motor.

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  • Question on wiring 2 hp, 1 phase, 230V motor.

    This motor goes on the Supermax mill I bought a year ago. The po had it wired with an on/off switch so that it only ran in clockwise rotation. I have had it apart for quite some time as other more pressing issues have taken precedence, and now have it's cleaned up, bearings checked and it's ready to go back together. Wiring is not my strong suit, and having reached 79 years of age, my memory is not what it once was. Which wire goes where is a bit of a puzzle. I had taken a picture of the terminal block inside the wiring housing, but it is not very clear. I also wrote down the numbers on each wire and which terminal post they go on. From the windings inside the motor, there are 4 red wires numbered 1,2,3 & 4, and 2 black wires, one numbered 4 & the other not numbered, but there was a #6 marker sleeve lying loose inside the terminal box that is not the same size as the ones on the other wires. There are also 2 short black wires numbered 4 and 6. they come through the case and have ring terminals on both ends # 4 is attached to one side of the centrifugal switch, the other switch terminal has nothing on it. # 6 is unattached at both ends, and has what looks like a 5 hand written on it. Neither of the capacitor terminals have a wire attached. The plan is to procure a drum switch, hook everything up and get the motor rotating both ways. If anyone can figure this mess out and tell me which wire goes where, including which wires to switch to reverse rotation, I will be forever grateful.
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    Last edited by Dave C; 05-08-2020, 03:18 PM.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  • #2
    If the motor has a data plate, can you post a picture of that? It may be helpful. There are several possibilities as to wiring, since the wire numbering is not per the most common US standard.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • #3
      Thanks Jerry, this is the data plate:
      Click image for larger version

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      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

      Lewis Grizzard

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      • #4
        useually there is a data plate that shows wiring for 110v/220v and also the wires to reverse.
        do you have that data plate?

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        • #5
          Looks like 6 terminals into the motor. Disconnect all wires from terminals. You will ohm terminal studs of motor. If you have an ohmmeter, one pair will have no resistance. No resistance pair is centrifical switch. Next pair with higher resistance is start winding. Last pair with somewhat lower resistance is run winding. Google wiring diagram for capacitor start motor. If two capacitors Google diagram for capacitor start capacitor run motor. After wiring give it a very short on then off. If it turns and no fuse blows you have it right and good to go. Check amps and volts at line side of motor while under load. Should match nameplate.

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          • #6
            Oops I see you have just wires sticking out of motor. Take your ohm readings on the wires.

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            • #7
              OK, that explains much

              The red wires are then the main winding, and the black the start. Not sure yet about the unconnected capacitor mentioned, but that is wrong and needs connected.

              The general deal is that the black wires should go to the centrifugal switch, the capacitor, and the start winding. It is a 115/230 motor, so the start winding is 115V, and is usually connected to the center of the two series main windings (if using 230V, as I assume you will), which is where the two red wires are connected, most likely #2 & #3. The other black wire is switched to either one end of the entire winding (FWD) or the opposite end (REV) Dunno which is which until trying it at this point.

              So, The first order of business will be to get the start circuit connected, with start switch, capacitor and start winding connected in series. Order of connection does not matter, whatever makes the most sense.

              After that connecting all up to a drum switch.

              Do you HAVE the drum switch, or do you need to choose one?
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                useually there is a data plate that shows wiring for 110v/220v and also the wires to reverse.
                do you have that data plate?
                Only info on the motor is the plate in the pic.
                “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                Lewis Grizzard

                Comment


                • #9
                  Those motors are dead simple- Notice the start coil leads, interchanging those two provide fwd/rev, these motors won't plug reverse though, they have to decelerate until the centrifugal switch drops out before reversing,
                  You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

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                  • #10
                    J Tiers: The motor will be run on 230 volts. I need to choose a drum switch

                    Weirdscience: Can I assume that the numbers on my wires are the same as the T numbers on the diagram?

                    Thanks everyone for your help. I have zero experience on this subject.
                    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                    Lewis Grizzard

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      They may match that drawing, the 1 thru 4 are OK, the start winding we are not sure about, due to the "4" you mentioned on the one wire, and no label on the other. But it does not matter a lot, you can number them as you please, since you are going to have to connect the start circuit up, and will therefore know what each wire does.

                      I am more used to the start winding being numbered 5 and 8, (6 and 7 are reserved for a two-voltage/two winding start system)

                      Your choice of drum switch is easier, since it only requires ONE switchable wire, so nearly any should work. Here are a number of types:

                      https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...asking-376298/
                      Last edited by J Tiers; 05-09-2020, 02:34 PM.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dave C View Post

                        Weirdscience: Can I assume that the numbers on my wires are the same as the T numbers on the diagram?
                        I would not, my default is to use an ohm meter to isolate the coils, wire to the diagram and once everything is working re-lable to match the diagram.

                        As for the drum switch, if I remember correctly, the last one I bought fit a Grizzly b-port clone and was something like $85 delivered. The ones intended for a mill are better quality than the run of the mill rotary switches we see littering Amazon and Ebay. The switch on a mill sees a lot more action on average.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          You can, also, separate the direction and on/off buttons.

                          I'd argue that is a good idea, more so on a lathe, maybe, because you can over-travel a drum switch to the "reverse" position. Unfortunately, with most single phase motors, "reverse" and "forward" are the same other than the start winding, so that just keeps it running.

                          Separate switches mean you are more likely to just stop the motor, which is what you want to do.

                          If you have three-phase, or a PSC motor, then you do get an actual reverse, which may be OK in whatever situation you have.
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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                          • #14
                            There are what's called hesitation, anti-plugging, or positive-off reversing switches, which prevent overtravel from forward to reverse. But I could not find very many for sale on the usual vendor sites. Here is more info:

                            http://www.eaton.com/Eaton/ProductsS...ches/index.htm
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

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                            • #15
                              The motor is back together, and between my notes, the pic I took of the terminal block, and help from y'all, I believe the wires are connected like they originally were. As soon as I figure out how to tie the thing down, I'll plug it in and hope I don't let the smoke out of it
                              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                              Lewis Grizzard

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