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Today I turned a countersink inside out!

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  • #16
    I have never tried annealing something. Did you get it to a fairly soft state or was it still a bitch to drill.?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by gellfex View Post
      Thanks guys. FWIW I saw some of the commercial products that are out there, but they were either really expensive, fully manual, or delivery was dubious in these uncertain times. I need to ship this order on Friday.

      ​​​​​​Also, I don't work much steel, I certainly didn't have drill rod in 3/4 or larger! I did have a huge, odd, countersink that I have never used in 30 years.
      I figured something like that was the case. And a good case it is. Make do and save the time needed for a drive and buying spree. Anyway it still came out looking really nice. Good bit o' tool making.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #18
        I didn't mean to question your solution. It was ingenious. And it works in a manner that is real similar to the one I purchased. Great post. Thanks!

        I just wanted to show how I solved a similar problem. The deburring tool that I bought was not overly expensive and I did use power to turn the rods that I deburred with it. Doing it by hand would have gotten real tedious, real fast. And it is a great addition to my tool chest as it does both internal and external edges. It also works with a great range of diameters: 3/16" to 1 1/2", I believe. I have used it many times since then.

        My shop made tool facing tool is for a single size only, but it really did a great job that otherwise would have required lathe or milling work. Just zip, zip, zip with a hand held drill.



        Originally posted by gellfex View Post
        Thanks guys. FWIW I saw some of the commercial products that are out there, but they were either really expensive, fully manual, or delivery was dubious in these uncertain times. I need to ship this order on Friday.

        ​​​​​​Also, I don't work much steel, I certainly didn't have drill rod in 3/4 or larger! I did have a huge, odd, countersink that I have never used in 30 years.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by plunger View Post
          I have never tried annealing something. Did you get it to a fairly soft state or was it still a bitch to drill.?
          Perfectly soft and lovely to work with. I used HSS on the lathe, but the 1" HSS end mill didn't cut it. Odd of my just using it badly are high since I don't mill much steel. Fortunately I used an old resharpened one so the ruined tool was no great loss. I switched to a 2 flute carbide insert end mill.

          For me, jobs like this really make me think about workflow. While a 1.75" piece of .437 with a set screw hole in the end is easy as pie on just the lathe, when you contemplate 50 and all the starts, stops, tool changes, drill changes to taps, it really starts to add up. What works for this is cut them on the bandsaw, face to accurate length and index drill on the mill, then use this tool for deburring. It's much faster to swap parts out of the mill vise (or flip them over) with the head running than to stop a lathe and swap parts.
          Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
            I didn't mean to question your solution. It was ingenious. And it works in a manner that is real similar to the one I purchased. Great post. Thanks!

            I just wanted to show how I solved a similar problem. The deburring tool that I bought was not overly expensive and I did use power to turn the rods that I deburred with it. Doing it by hand would have gotten real tedious, real fast. And it is a great addition to my tool chest as it does both internal and external edges. It also works with a great range of diameters: 3/16" to 1 1/2", I believe. I have used it many times since then.

            My shop made tool facing tool is for a single size only, but it really did a great job that otherwise would have required lathe or milling work. Just zip, zip, zip with a hand held drill.
            I did like the look of that handheld burring tool, and will probably add one to the arsenal.
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #21
              The blue one in Paul's last picture is very effective. His may be plastic, mine is all metal, but both will likely work the same.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #22
                I recall the plant electrician at work, had some weird gizmo attached to some of his screwdrivers, that would deburr both the ID and the OD on the conduit simultaneously. Both the tool, and the screwdrivers, were probably as old as me. Evidently they did good work though, local code requires hard conduit for hardwired applications, and everything required to be hardwired in our place. He was using it all the time, but I never found out the name of his screwdriver attachment.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #23
                  Here's a link to a similar tool I designed for Brownells probably 18 or 20 years ago...they've modified it a bit, but the concept is similar. https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...r-prod980.aspx Nope, don't get no stinkin' royalties...
                  David Kaiser
                  “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
                  ― Robert A. Heinlein

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                    I recall the plant electrician at work, had some weird gizmo attached to some of his screwdrivers, that would deburr both the ID and the OD on the conduit simultaneously. Both the tool, and the screwdrivers, were probably as old as me. Evidently they did good work though, local code requires hard conduit for hardwired applications, and everything required to be hardwired in our place. He was using it all the time, but I never found out the name of his screwdriver attachment.
                    "Conduit reamer". Many types available, hand and power attachments.



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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post

                      "Conduit reamer". Many types available, hand and power attachments.


                      Thanks for the education. His screwdrivers were the Craftsman set purchased in the 60's and the conduit reamers were these little round metal things that clamped onto the shank somehow. About the size and shape of a bottle cap. Did a nice job, too.
                      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 38_Cal View Post
                        Here's a link to a similar tool I designed for Brownells probably 18 or 20 years ago...they've modified it a bit, but the concept is similar. https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...r-prod980.aspx Nope, don't get no stinkin' royalties...
                        Cool. I don't see any relief to enable cutting, are the 2 sides offset to each other? My only patent was also under a plain contract. Oh well. I've done much cleverer things also as one shots.
                        Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                        • #27
                          I just purchased two new Noga deburring tools with an assortment of bits. No surprises there, but they had a page in the box that had a brief description of the available cutters/blades for that tool and among them are two that they describe as Cranked, External Countersinks. They appear to be cone shaped with the base of that cone as the working end. It appears that you install them on the standard Noga handle, which allows rotation, place the cone over the end of a round part, and crank the tool around that part/cone to chamfer it's edge.

                          The Noga item numbers are RDE-18 EX2001 and RDE-28 EX3001 and their ranges are 4-18mm and 8-28mm respectively. I am going to check the prices and probably order one of each. On that sheet the -18 appears to come with the crank arm and the -28 appears not to. So the cone ends may be detachable.

                          https://www.noga.com/Products/excn/H.../EX28_-_EX3001

                          All the usual disclaimers apply. I have no affiliation or relationship with Noga except as a paying customer.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Paul Alciatore The smaller one does come with the arm as one piece and slots into any of the standard holders. Works pretty well. I think the larger - which I don't have - is more modular, has a separate crank, requires a different handle but you can swap the ends for different sizes of internal or external countersink.
                            There are smaller internal countersinks that are one-piece as well. Good for deburring holes (in anything) and a quick countersink in aluminium but you wouldn't want to be trying to do lots of countersinking in steel with it.

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