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Semi OT fishing reel.

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  • Semi OT fishing reel.

    I have been doing maintenance around the house seeing that the whole nation are now prisoners.I miss my fishing and was wondering if these fishing reels are only used in S Africa.
    They are fantastic in terms of simplicity.I changed the bearings in this fishing reel and they must be about seven years old already and still perfect.
    I used a plastic made in S Africa called vesconite. Its amazing stuff.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	scarborow reel.jpg Views:	0 Size:	12.9 KB ID:	1874425

  • #2
    Is that a flyrod? That's the only thing here of that type. I've been meaning to get out fishing in my kayak real soon, but the weather has sucked and I'm swamped with work. Around here harassment of fishermen has been only sporadic. There's been a good deal of stupidity on the part of fishermen too.
    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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    • #3
      Reminds me off the old steel line laker reels. Usually attached to a short stubby rod with a spring tip. I've got a couple old ones in my stash.

      Steelheaders use another similar reel called a centerpin. Designed for float fishing streams. Tough to tell any details about what's in the pic, but is it just a straight up spool on a bearing with a palm drag?

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      • #4
        No they are very basic reels with no breaking or rachet.
        Click image for larger version

Name:	scarborough reel.JPG
Views:	174
Size:	107.1 KB
ID:	1874469

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        • #5
          We have very few ports where you can launch a boat so most of our launches are surf launches.This is an example. On a big day they can be quite exhilarating
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4d1VzW3C2U

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          • #6
            Originally posted by plunger View Post
            No they are very basic reels with no breaking or rachet.
            Click image for larger version

Name:	scarborough reel.JPG
Views:	174
Size:	107.1 KB
ID:	1874469
            Whoa, that looks like a knuckle rapper if you slip! Never seen anything like it. Other than cheap and simple what are it's attractions? Is it just a nostalgic holdover from when you couldn't get decent American or Japanese reels past the embargoes?
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #7
              I thought that would be the answer. If you dont know how to handle this reel it becomes a knuckle concerto.But you will find the old school anglers will far prefer this type of reel. They just dont pack up.

              The brake is just a cloth jammed in between the reel and rod. But once you fight the fish you feel every movement of the fish. Its far more sensitive and you lose that mechanical feel. Its hard to explain. But if a marlin takes it your reel may become like a circular saw. My mate hooked a marlin on one and jammed it in the seat because it took him by suprise and he was trying to slow it down.There was sponge and leather flying everywhere

              It helps to have a glove but I dont bother. Our fish are normally not bigger than 30kg so you can handle most fish.
              Ive had a few sailfish on them . But when it comes to big fish like dagga salmon which are slow but tough and in deep water this reel makes a modern reel look stupid.

              Its not for the faint hearted.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by plunger View Post
                We have very few ports where you can launch a boat so most of our launches are surf launches.This is an example. On a big day they can be quite exhilarating
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4d1VzW3C2U
                Exhilarating? ...yeah, I would say so!
                The video starts with the boat already down on the sand; how did it get to, and on, the beach in the first place? It would be interesting to see the entire process.
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by plunger View Post
                  I thought that would be the answer. If you dont know how to handle this reel it becomes a knuckle concerto.But you will find the old school anglers will far prefer this type of reel. They just dont pack up.

                  The brake is just a cloth jammed in between the reel and rod. But once you fight the fish you feel every movement of the fish. Its far more sensitive and you lose that mechanical feel. Its hard to explain. But if a marlin takes it your reel may become like a circular saw. My mate hooked a marlin on one and jammed it in the seat because it took him by suprise and he was trying to slow it down.There was sponge and leather flying everywhere

                  It helps to have a glove but I dont bother. Our fish are normally not bigger than 30kg so you can handle most fish.
                  Ive had a few sailfish on them . But when it comes to big fish like dagga salmon which are slow but tough and in deep water this reel makes a modern reel look stupid.

                  Its not for the faint hearted.
                  Cool. Mind if I copy your post over to a thread I started with your boat pic on a fishing site? https://www.stripersonline.com/surft...e-reel/?page=2 They'd get a kick out of it, not as international a crowd there. I gave the pic a snarky headline, but the guys defended the reel.
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                  • #10
                    That's similar to a mooching reel used on the West Coast, traditionally for fishing cut herring in kelp beds for salmon if I remember correctly. Also similar to centerpin reels used on the west coast and great lakes regions for salmon and steelhead fishing when they are running in the rivers, lets an angler float fish a roe bag or other bait down the river in the most natural way without any drag. I believe centerpin fishing is also popular in the UK, but I can't really comment on that. Both mooching and centerpin reels would usually run in the 4"-5" diameter range, mooching rods would be on the long side for boat rods (10'or so) and centerpin rods range from the 12' to 14' length.

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                    • #11
                      You have to be at a different skill level when it comes to fishing with these for game fish. But for bottom fishing you will not find a single commercial boat fishing without these reels . In fact I can guarantee you that ninety percent of all serious bottom fishing anglers on boats use these reels. Maybe even more than ninety percent.
                      What do you think of the way boats are launched in S Africa from the beach.?

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                      • #12
                        i had a similar wheel when baloon fishing in australia, but it had a brake.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by plunger View Post
                          What do you think of the way boats are launched in S Africa from the beach.?
                          Looks like it's hard on the boat and occupants. Maybe the launch vehicle, too.
                          Kansas City area

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Toolguy View Post

                            Looks like it's hard on the boat and occupants. Maybe the launch vehicle, too.
                            Boats handle it well The surf varies but as a skipper you get used to launching and choosing breaks in the surf. These bigger boats are launched with a pole but many of the smaller skiboats are actually physically pushed into the water using vulcanized rollers. It can be hard on the vehicles but seldom do things go wrong.
                            In fact the very next launch of the boat in the video that same vehicle was a write off. It got caught in the surf.

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                            • #15
                              Hah! I was given a couple boxes of old fishing equipment, and there was a reel like that included. I thought it was just something used as a depth finder

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