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  • Lathe unloading slings

    I am finally, hopefully, with luck, getting the Monarch C shipped to Arizona. I plan to rent a big forklift to unload it but also need to purchase a couple of twisted eye, 3", 5000lb slings. Anybody got an idea of how long I should get? Asked the rigger but no joy on that yet. I am not going to rent the slings for obvious reasons. So McMaster and I am thinking 6 or 8 feet. Anyway its a Monarch C so any ideas appreciated.

  • #2
    Find a manual and follow the manufacturers instructions. Don’t guess.

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    • #3
      You could try something like this with appropriately sized hardware..





      or this



      I've made a similar clamp to lift my little 9" SB and it works great.
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • #4
        Chains work pretty good too.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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        • #5
          Where are you lifting it from? I have loaded/unloaded around 10 lathes with slings, and most times I have just lifted from the casting webs in between the ways. Sometimes they are not placed in a good spot for weight distribution so I have also used some heavy wood blocks under the bed, then lift from the blocks. I have a pair of 6 foot slings, a 7 ft sling, and a 3 footer and have gotten by with those but a pair of 8 or 10 footers would be nice also if you have the lifting height.

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          • #6
            With vector's lathe being such a short bed, he may need to lift from the spindle for balance. If not I suspect the balance point will be very close to under the spindle nose.
            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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            • #7
              First thing you need to know is the weight (you probably know this already). Next, as MB suggests, is to locate the centre of gravity. Then design your lifting points accordingly. Careful if lifting from low down. Loads lifted like this roll over with monotonous regularity and end up with the centre of mass below the suspension points. If you must lift from low down, an additional safety line from high up on the load (maybe around the back of a headstock chuck for instance) to the hook can avoid a nasty accident. Ian
              All of the gear, no idea...

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              • #8
                Here is the way I lift my Nardini 14x40. The sling is a 6’ continuous loop. I like the loop slings better than the the eye on each end ones but I have both, and the both work good. Click image for larger version

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                • #9
                  I have the lifting manual, they used chains back then probably because they didn't have modern web slings. But anyway I am using web slings as with a forklift chains are a pain in the ass. I know the blocking program from the manual. I can't make a bunch of lifting hardware because I don't have the lathe. I just need to know what length for the sling eye to go over the fork down under the bed and back up to the fork again. I am buying 5000 lbs slings which give 10,000 in the U so that's 20,000 lifting weight. Lathe is 5500. I always overkill and can then use them for other things. There are no height restrictions but since the lathe will be on a flatbed semi trailer and the forklift will only go so high I don't want to get slings that are too long. I know how to rig and lift just don't know this lathe for the length.

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                  • #10
                    Does your lathe have lift points? My import 1440 has holes I can slide a straight bar through that appear to serve no other useful purpose. (I use a straight pick.)
                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                    • #11
                      If you wrap the slings around the bed, be sure to block them out on the front so you don't bend the leadscrew and drive rods to the carriage.
                      Kansas City area

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                      • #12
                        ...or put the slings between the bed and the leadscrew / feedshaft. Ian
                        All of the gear, no idea...

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                        • #13
                          I put a 2x4 under the bed and loop a sling around it, then up through the opening in the bed. Push it tight up against the spindle, then mash the tailstock against it and lock the tailstock hard. Always seems to be pretty close to the balance point.

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                          • #14
                            I would think it depends on the length of the lathe bed and how high can the forklift go. Most of the forklifts I've used go 25 feet. I would want about 2 feet of sling sticking up above the bed at each end, so the length of the bed will determine which sling.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Forestgnome View Post
                              I put a 2x4 under the bed and loop a sling around it, then up through the opening in the bed. Push it tight up against the spindle, then mash the tailstock against it and lock the tailstock hard. Always seems to be pretty close to the balance point.
                              Well maybe for a light lathe. If I understand you I think you are completely relying on a 2x4 to take a side load of the weight of the lathe. In my case that would be 5500 pounds. Seriously? So the strength of the sling is meaningless as its a 2x4 not the sling that is the weak link. Have a defect or knot and that 2x4 goes out the window. Coming from a construction background this is something we would never do. Wood is generally not an accepted lifting component as it cannot be rated reliably.

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