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  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    And I cringe at double negatives. And some very famous people use "irregardless" when being interviewed on TV
    "Regard" = With respect
    "Regardless" = Without respect
    "Irregardless" = Without - Without respect ----or is it a positive with respect--which is it ?

    excuse me while i go back in the shop and work with some casted iron
    Rich

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave C View Post
    If you pay attention to all the grammatical, pronounciation, syntax and just plain misuse you will notice many, many errors of speech. One of my favorites: "Had went"
    I think you spelled pronunciation incorrectly. (sorry, couldn't resist)

    Most abused imo is "works good". Good is only ever an adjective or noun. You've stumbled if you use it as an adverb. This frequently happens in the media where you'd think they'd know better, after all words and language are their stock in trade. Then there's "vintage". Vintage is 'of an era or time', not old. Its a bit meaningless without a time reference, i.e. 2019 vintage (despite countless illiterate websites' use to the contrary).

    I'm a long way from perfect, but we should all do our part to improve literacy!
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 05-15-2020, 02:56 PM.

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  • Corbettprime
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post

    Politically correct schools? Where on earth did that come from?

    Are you seriously suggesting that illiteracy is greater in "politically correct" California than in, for example, Mississippi or Arkansas or (ahem) Colorado?

    Oh, BTW, you might want to use your spell checker...


    -js
    Yup, California is definitely worse than Colorado. And it's kind of fun to bypass spellchecker and see who noticed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hopefuldave
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

    And you never know in advance what is the spelling and pronunciation.

    To make things more complicated I learned British English in the school and nearly half of the tv series I watch are British.
    You learned English, not American "simplified" English. Please excuse the correction!

    Dave H. (the other one)

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post
    As you know, English is a very irregular language. The past tense of "cast" is "cast". My wife (my authority on language) points out that your verbs are "regular" while "cast" is an "irregular" verb.

    -js
    And you never know in advance what is the spelling and pronunciation.

    To make things more complicated I learned British English in the school and nearly half of the tv series I watch are British.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post
    As you know, English is a very irregular language. The past tense of "cast" is "cast". My wife (my authority on language) points out that your verbs are "regular" while "cast" is an "irregular" verb.

    -js
    Very irregular, indeed. And the past tense of "cast" was "casted" but that fell out of favor around the 16th century or so. But it's appearance in both printed and spoken language is on the rise again. Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your perspective), English is a dynamic language that continues to evolve in both diction and grammar.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave C
    replied
    Originally posted by darryl View Post
    I casted that bad capacitator in the bin, along with a resistitor and the transistitor. They were both bad- one was burnt, and the other was burned.
    Gotta love it 😀

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  • darryl
    replied
    I casted that bad capacitator in the bin, along with a resistitor and the transistitor. They were both bad- one was burnt, and the other was burned.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Stewart
    replied
    Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post
    Agreed, too d--n many illiterate fools that are products of policitically correct schools!
    Politically correct schools? Where on earth did that come from?

    Are you seriously suggesting that illiteracy is greater in "politically correct" California than in, for example, Mississippi or Arkansas or (ahem) Colorado?

    Oh, BTW, you might want to use your spell checker...


    -js

    Leave a comment:


  • Corbettprime
    replied
    Agreed, too d--n many illiterate fools that are products of policitically correct schools!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Stewart
    replied
    As you know, English is a very irregular language. The past tense of "cast" is "cast". My wife (my authority on language) points out that your verbs are "regular" while "cast" is an "irregular" verb.

    -js

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave C
    replied
    If you pay attention to all the grammatical, pronounciation, syntax and just plain misuse you will notice many, many errors of speech. One of my favorites: "Had went"

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Were they casted in aluminium, and then lathed using a dee are oh?

    "cast" is the correct when refering to a "cast part". I wouldn't put too much stock in things said on you tube and pod casts. While sometimes the message can be good, the delivery is terrible. And also the inverse is true as well. In short, you tube is like a box of chocolates.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bented
    replied
    A suffix added to words in the English language indicating a past tense.

    acted
    bollocked
    creamed
    disfigured
    educated
    buggered
    greeted
    hardened

    And so on

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Stewart
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

    Bloody dumb Yanks, I'd say

    Frankly, if I heard one of my countrymen saying "casted" in a YouTube video, I'd switch to a different video, assuming that the speaker had absolutely zero credibility.

    It does seem "casted" is gaining popularity in the spoken language, though: https://grammarist.com/usage/casted/
    Took the words right out of my mouth.

    -js

    Leave a comment:

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