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Big lathe upgrade/ tool gloat

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  • ken
    replied
    sitting on the floor and 4" in height big differences as is sitting and moving. (Gravity is an unforgiving bitch) wider the base the better when moving. My 1978 vintage 13" colchester is still bolted to the factory shipping skids and they are 4X6 I don't think I would take them off I like the height of the lathe be safe Ken

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  • JCByrd24
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post

    I think you would be disappointed with AXA size tool holders on that machine. BXA at a minimum.
    I think you’re right...

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by JCByrd24 View Post
    It came with a 3 jaw, 4 jaw, and face plate but no tooling and unfortunately no steady. If the AXA and holders sell with the Enco I’ll go with a BXA or CXA for this one. For the guy who thinks the price wasn’t gloat worthy find a better deal on a better lathe I dare ya
    I think you would be disappointed with AXA size tool holders on that machine. BXA at a minimum.

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  • 754
    replied
    IMO being heavy and 3 phase does not lower the value for buyers that want the lathe to produce work for them. If they are experienced, they realize a lighter lathe will generwlly not produce as well.
    another thing and I know this from experience.. the heavier more modern type lathes tend to be set up better for threading than their lighter counterparts, and that difference can get a lot more work out faster. I could regularly knock out first piece of many common threads in 10 minutes or under, in metric and standard....

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  • JCByrd24
    replied
    Challenger no worries at all. We are all here to learn and share in this forum in my experience. Being so heavy and 3 phase does tend to lower the “value” compared to a nice restored south bend no matter where you are. In fact my 80’s enco will likely bring at least half an this beast because it’ll go in a pickup and runs on single phase.

    Cijuanni you might be right and those are definitely lifting points!!

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  • cijuanni
    replied
    Originally posted by JCByrd24 View Post

    yes they are sight glasses. HS end is main lube. The motor is direct coupled to a 6 speed gear box the size of a manual transmission for a car. The main oil sump is that gearbox with a pump off the side which feeds all the necessary bits in the HS and QCQB (Which BTW does both English and metric threading without switching any change gears, save 13tpi). The HS has an 8:1 reduction as well for 12 total speeds from 28 RPM to 2500. TS end is coolant reservoir.

    I’m telling you after a little research I’m so stoked i found this thing locally! 3 and 4 jaw and face plate but no tooling.
    I think he might be looking at the lifting points in the bases.
    Little steel covers that rotate aside to allow a 2" dia steel bar to be run through and lifted with a sling on each end.

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  • challenger
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Really? Out of curiosity, just what do you think it is worth? It seems like a lot of machine for $2500 to me.

    JC, that looks like a great lathe, a great find. Happy chips!



    I guess it's worth $2500.00. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to have that lathe. I've seen some, not a ton, in my area that are comparable go for the same price and up. The smallish lathes like mine seem to be at a premium and go for nearly the same as that "big" lathe. I guess I'm wrong and the lathe is gloat worthy. That's all good from my standpoint. I wasn't trying to pee in anyone's breakfast cereal so I apologize if I offended anyone?

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  • JCByrd24
    replied
    Ken, the skids are nearly as wide as the base, I could have gotten another inch or so I guess, and they are lagged in each end. It only moved straight 5’ or so like this inside the garage. It was lifted off the trailer. On the trailer the skids were perpendicular and again lagged. This lathe has never been bolted so essentially it’s been operated for 20-30 years in nearly the same configuration. It is incredibly stable and there is no way a single person attempting to tip it over could. It’s nothing like an import on tin can stands. For future moving I’ll be building a set of wheels for the HS end and a dolley for the TS end like Tom Lipton shows in one of this videos.
    Last edited by JCByrd24; 05-17-2020, 02:48 PM.

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  • ken
    replied
    Lathes in general are very top heavy and easy to tip over. Next time you move it move the skids out as far as you can. Better yet use 4X8 or 4X10s and use as big a lag bolt as you can use you want as much width as you can get. Sorry I don't like your skids Ken

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  • JCByrd24
    replied
    Unfortunately the spindle is dead on 35mm an RCH over 1-3/8”. The motor shaft is for the fan, which was in 3 pieces. Fan cover is still off. Brake is in the gearbox in the base and has 3 wires going to it but it’s completely internal. It appears to be 24v and must be a clutch too, but 24v is good it should be easy enough to integrate to the VFD. Carriage appears to be lubed by a feed shaft driven pump. There’s a sight glass there for flow indication as well as on the HS and the main gearbox but I didn’t know enough at the time to check flow to all of those when they ran it for me. But all indications are that will be no issue. The motor leads were brittle in the peckerhead so I don’t know if I should pull the motor and take it to a shop or hope for the best.

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by Glug View Post
    That looks like a very nice machine. That t-slot cross slide configuration is really versatile. The external shaft on the motor is interesting. Did you find a brake? That would be a great spot to mount a brake, or even take accessory power.

    How is the carriage lubricated? Have you looked behind the apron and under the cross slide? A mirror is really useful for that, and sometimes a cell phone is even better. Any indications of dried coolant?
    If that lathe is like mine which was built by Stanko the motor runs and direction and braking is done inside the headstock. So a brake on the electric motor might not work.

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  • Glug
    replied
    That looks like a very nice machine. That t-slot cross slide configuration is really versatile. The external shaft on the motor is interesting. Did you find a brake? That would be a great spot to mount a brake, or even take accessory power.

    How is the carriage lubricated? Have you looked behind the apron and under the cross slide? A mirror is really useful for that, and sometimes a cell phone is even better. Any indications of dried coolant?

    Leave a comment:


  • boslab
    replied
    Good catch, change the head oil ASAP. They are good machines, stanko were involved if I remember right, also good kit.
    on a par with dsg, Colchester but cheaper ( at one time dsg did the castings first monarch, small world)
    mark

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  • tmc_31
    replied
    Originally posted by JCByrd24 View Post
    Yes the whole stand is cast. Chuck mount is a D1-4 and spindle bore is 1-3/8”, the only negative to this machine.
    Did you measure the spindle bore? Or is that from a spec? My 1340 Jet spec says it has a 1-3/8" spindle bore but I can pass a 1-1/2" shaft through it just fine. Also I put a CXA tool post on it. It is a little large for my 13" lathe but certainly usable. I woould think a CXA would be perfect for a 14X40.

    Nice score!
    Tim

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  • JCByrd24
    replied
    Some more pics.
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 4 photos.

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