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Gravely tractor axle repair ideas needed.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Another way is to grind out the axle so it will take the next size wider key.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Make a key form out of carbon and braze it in with aluminum-bronze filler rod.
    Done this before and it worked wonderful. Funny, I did not think carbon would
    glow red like the steel, but for sure it does. This would be a pretty non-invasive
    way to repair. Then file to size.

    --Doozer
    Carbon in the form of graphite has some pretty neat properties. It boils while still solid IIRC at around 6500F. Makes an excellent mold or crucible. I have a few big blocks of it around here that I sawed out of old crucible bottoms -- the resistance is less than 1 ohm in an inch thick slab. Very handy for TIG on small parts -- just hook your ground up to the carbon block. Also it has insane thermal conductivity, like silver --

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  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    You might be able to get a new axel at a reasonable price and save some bother.
    Axels are for figure skaters.

    -D

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  • Doozer
    replied
    Make a key form out of carbon and braze it in with aluminum-bronze filler rod.
    Done this before and it worked wonderful. Funny, I did not think carbon would
    glow red like the steel, but for sure it does. This would be a pretty non-invasive
    way to repair. Then file to size.

    --Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • true temper
    replied
    If it were mine I would rough it up and glue it together with Devcon plastic steel. I have fixed many things like this. If you need to take it apart heat it up and it will be free.

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  • old mart
    replied
    You might be able to get a new axel at a reasonable price and save some bother.

    Leave a comment:


  • nc5a
    replied
    Okay guys, copper woodruff key it is. Many thanks for what appears to be reasonable repair solution. I'll post photos of the process for your enjoyment.

    Ron

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  • Glug
    replied
    I have that same tractor and use it for mowing, fairly heavy snow blowing and leaf collection.

    I wonder if you should figure out the engine issues before you spend much time finding alternate ways to repair the axles in situ? Engine might be coming out anyway... Also, the status of the PTO is another critical decision point that could have you opening it up.

    How are your clutches and the pressure plates? Those plates cannot be removed without opening the trans. They can be smoothed in place, as I had to do last year.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Another idea if you don't want to bother with welding and saving the Woodruff key arrangement, is to use Dutch keys. Much easier to service at least.

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  • mickeyf
    replied
    Seems to me there is little to lose with the copper woodruff weld in place method. Worst case, it's not acceptable, you have to pull the axle anyway and then you can get at it to clean it up proper.

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  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
    Make a copper woodruff, clamp it in the slot and build weld around it.
    Pull it out and file the results proper.
    Another vote for this approach if you do not want to pull the axle.

    Shield off anything you don't want weld spatter on (I used kitchen aluminum foil), wrap a dripping wet rag around the shaft between the place you are welding and any seals, secure your copper key in place, clamp your ground clamp to the shaft right where you are about to weld, and zap around it with you welder. I used MIG as that's what I had handy. Let it cool and pull out the copper key.. Then just clean up with a file, dremel, or whatever and you are good to go. Works great.

    I have done this a number of times, twice on Subaru crankshafts in place in the car. The welding is very quick and not large amount of material needs to be deposited, so no distortion or other issues.

    One our sponsor magazines published a little write-up I did about doing this to one of the Subarus a few years back.

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  • nc5a
    replied
    Originally posted by v860rich View Post
    What qsimdo said is exactly what I did to a shaft similar to yours.

    THANX RICH
    Did the shaft distort from the welding process? Did you stabilize the shaft with a fixture before welding? This sounds doable. Thanks to both you and qsimdo.

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  • v860rich
    replied
    What qsimdo said is exactly what I did to a shaft similar to yours.

    THANX RICH

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  • QSIMDO
    replied
    Make a copper woodruff, clamp it in the slot and build weld around it.
    Pull it out and file the results proper.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    I had to do basically the same kind of repair to my old Simplicity rear axel. I had to split the case and take everything apart. Those hogged out Woodruff key slots are typical on small tractor hubs. All that back and forth changing directions. I would add an extra key while you've got it apart.

    JL.....

    Leave a comment:

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