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  • #16
    The town of Northeast is not 6-1/2 hours from Tonawanda.
    How slow did you drive?
    I once drove from Buffalo to Ohio to get a BJ and it only took 3 hours.
    ( the drive, unfortunately not the BJ).
    By the way, nice score. You must feel like an axle without a wheel !

    -Doozer
    DZER

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
      I see a "4 way" tool post. Did they have those in 1945? I would think "original equipment" for that would be a lantern type tool post. The shop I worked in was old school to the extreme to be sure, but I don't remember seeing 4 ways, much less QC even then in the late '70's. Nice find in any case!
      You're right, the lathe came with the lantern post and some tooling, but I swapped on the 4-way. I just don't have the patience for lantern posts. Makes it easier to grind the bits when they're always going to be at the same height.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
        The town of Northeast is not 6-1/2 hours from Tonawanda.
        How slow did you drive?
        I once drove from Buffalo to Ohio to get a BJ and it only took 3 hours.
        ( the drive, unfortunately not the BJ).
        By the way, nice score. You must feel like an axle without a wheel !

        -Doozer
        Actually didn't know there was a town called Northeast. Went thru 390 south to 15/80 eastbound to zip 18225. Went 65 the whole way mostly. Cops at the bottom of the hills...

        Ja, it was a one-in-a-lifetime score, either do it or hate yourself forever kinda thing. You know how it is when you're only gonna get one chance.
        Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 05-20-2020, 12:41 AM.
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #19
          NICE!

          I bought Logan 10 inch as my "first lathe". It looked a lot like that SB, only grungy with sulfur oil. Came from a closing Air Conditioning shop, so it was in good shape.

          Boy! Did I make a lot of money with that machine. I sold it though, bought a house , and more machines ;-)

          That Logan lathe is likely all worn out now. The young fellow who bought it was building up his shop. He had work, he kept saying.

          I helped him break down and load the machine in his pickup, then drove over and helped unload it at his place. I was young then as well.

          Yup. I bet it's all worn out by now.....

          Maybe you can wear that SB out........ Bet 'cha can't! ;-)
          Last edited by CalM; 05-20-2020, 01:00 AM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CalM View Post
            NICE!
            Maybe you can wear that SB out........ Bet 'cha can't! ;-)
            Thanks! yup, I'm pumped. Got it in the house by muscle power, and up on the bench the same way.
            It's going to have a nice well-cared-for life. The biggest question is gonna be who inherits it.
            I don't think I'm gonna add any noticeable wear.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #21
              Interesting, that milling slide looks like a Palmgren.
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                Interesting, that milling slide looks like a Palmgren.
                Possible, I would welcome any input on that -- wasn't sure if it was original SB. I would like to modify it so it mounts directly in place of the compound. Basically turn up a new dovetail plug.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                  Thanks! yup, I'm pumped. Got it in the house by muscle power, and up on the bench the same way.
                  It's going to have a nice well-cared-for life. The biggest question is gonna be who inherits it.
                  I don't think I'm gonna add any noticeable wear.
                  Start looking for someone who will.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by CalM View Post

                    Start looking for someone who will.
                    Nope. She'll get used, but well cared for.
                    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      Possible, I would welcome any input on that -- wasn't sure if it was original SB. I would like to modify it so it mounts directly in place of the compound. Basically turn up a new dovetail plug.
                      MrPete222 has a video of that,
                      I think he started with an angle plate, and got the mill attach directly over the crosslide with no overhang

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                        Possible, I would welcome any input on that -- wasn't sure if it was original SB. I would like to modify it so it mounts directly in place of the compound. Basically turn up a new dovetail plug.
                        Does it mount that way? The SB did, but the pic looks a lot more like it mounts on the compound. And it has the look of an earlier version of mine...I still have a Palmgren milling attachment, it looks much like that.

                        Your plan of ditching the compound mounting is wise. There is just too much overhanging weight with the Palmgren to work well with the Logan, which is similar in size to the SB. Then you add the workpiece.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Ringo View Post

                          MrPete222 has a video of that,
                          I think he started with an angle plate, and got the mill attach directly over the crosslide with no overhang
                          Thanks for the tip, I used to watch all his videos, But he's got so many of them that I got lost So now I'm gonna look for that one. He does a lot of south bend and bridgeport stuff I recall.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                            Does it mount that way? The SB did, but the pic looks a lot more like it mounts on the compound. And it has the look of an earlier version of mine...I still have a Palmgren milling attachment, it looks much like that.

                            Your plan of ditching the compound mounting is wise. There is just too much overhanging weight with the Palmgren to work well with the Logan, which is similar in size to the SB. Then you add the workpiece.
                            Yup I didn't like the overhang, especially on a milling setup. It does mount to the compound. Paul Alciatore has a really cool set of plans for a milling table/sub-plate for SB9, that replaces the compound. I want to make that too, so I could do either way for a milling setup.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Here's the Palmgren on the Logan. The handwheel on the slide screw is added, it was originally just a square "spud"

                              Yours might be an earlier type, but it also may be a similar type from another company, maybe Enco, or someone else. Ther are similarities, but some basic differences.

                              The Southbend version is here: http://www.lathes.co.uk/southbend/page10.html

                              Last edited by J Tiers; 05-20-2020, 01:47 AM.
                              CNC machines only go through the motions.

                              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                                Here's the Palmgren on the Logan. The handwheel on the slide screw is added, it was originally just a square "spud"

                                Yours might be an earlier type, but it also may be a similar type from another company, maybe Enco, or someone else. Ther are similarities, but some basic differences.
                                Its very similar, but there are differences as you say. There is absolutely no manufacturers marks on it, all I can find is the same number "17" stamped on all the parts. The feed screw must be 20TPI because there are 50 dial divisions.
                                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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