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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    Yeah probably so.... but the gear does not need to be anything special at all.
    Nope nothing really special about it. Problem is, all the manufacturers have only 1/4" face width. I would rather see like 1/2" face width, thats what it looks like from the pics of originals. Its not a real common gear either -- had to do some searching for 24 pitch 32 teeth. Of all places, Stock Drive Products has it, but the face width is wrong. Neither Boston nor Browning has it in stock. And eBay is a sick joke when searching for gears -- an exercise in frustration.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    Not necessarily -- there is a 3/16 keyway in the lead screw, so any gear that goes against it has to be wide enough to bridge over that without getting all chewed up. I have a sheet of brass that I was going to try, until I thought things through a bit more.
    Yeah probably so.... but the gear does not need to be anything special at all.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Ringo View Post
    Somewhere I saw where a guy had no thread dial, so he just put a mark on the leadscrew on left end, at gearbox,
    Wait for the mark to come around and engage it.
    I've heard of that but I can't find the exact story. There's been guys that are way smarter than me....

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  • RB211
    replied
    I happen to have an extra South Bend 9" thread dial laying around, some where

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  • Ringo
    replied
    Somewhere I saw where a guy had no thread dial, so he just put a mark on the leadscrew on left end, at gearbox,
    Wait for the mark to come around and engage it.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post

    You can improve on that. Chunk of 2x6 underneath, leftover 2x4 scraps cut on bandsaw - if you are careful to set the height you don't even have to lift it for the cam-lock or threaded spindle to line up perfectly. Crude, perhaps, but effective.
    Yep, that's on my "someday" to-do list.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Thread dial gears are totally non-critical.

    You could stick pins in a piece of wood, or cut one out of a flattened tin can and that would probably work fine for years.
    Not necessarily -- there is a 3/16 keyway in the lead screw, so any gear that goes against it has to be wide enough to bridge over that without getting all chewed up. I have a sheet of brass that I was going to try, until I thought things through a bit more.

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  • mickeyf
    replied
    the 3-jaw weighs more than it looks! ...then I set a piece of wood across the ways.
    You can improve on that. Chunk of 2x6 underneath, leftover 2x4 scraps cut on bandsaw - if you are careful to set the height you don't even have to lift it for the cam-lock or threaded spindle to line up perfectly. Crude, perhaps, but effective.
    Click image for larger version

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Thread dial gears are totally non-critical.

    You could stick pins in a piece of wood, or cut one out of a flattened tin can and that would probably work fine for years.

    The Logan has a 16 tooth gear on the dial, that is not even a helical gear, and it works fine. I have a spare SB thread dial that I picked up for 5 bucks that I plan to adapt to the Logan, just to get the 8 divisions, and quarter pitch resolution

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by 754 View Post
    Should be able to make the gear on a tilted Dividing head. I made a 7/8 or so one for a Cadillac power window drive..
    I have same SB 9, same reversing cursing lever for leadscrew, just a tad slower. Also a 3 ft, which is pretty short around 22 inches work length.
    I've actually seen guys use a straight cut spur gear, they just tilt the housing a bit. Not original, but effective. My main issue would be getting up some kind of powered spindle to move with the carriage, using the lathe spindle for indexing. There are companies that manufacture gears in the form of long, splined bar stock -- just saw off the thickness of gear that you need and bore it out.

    I just saw an NOS SB9 thread dial on eBay with the original box and everything.... bidding was starting at $250. If I can sell reproductions at half that, and still break even, I would be happy.

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  • 754
    replied
    Should be able to make the gear on a tilted Dividing head. I made a 7/8 or so one for a Cadillac power window drive..
    I have same SB 9, same reversing cursing lever for leadscrew, just a tad slower. Also a 3 ft, which is pretty short around 22 inches work length.
    but I have no gears , no gearbox, no 4 way. Tried to make a few parts last year, like 6 pieces.. and I gotta say, I need a 4way index tool post and a carriage handwhhel dial, or long travel indicator to make anything in like 6 or 8 pieces. I got spoiled running my big modern lathe , but it has not been under power the last few years.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    I remember reading on another forum that someone got an SB9 (or maybe 10) threading dial printed for him. Didn't last, but would be a good candidate for lost PLA casting - maybe Dan Dubeau would like that as a casting project. Just get some car batteries and you could do it in lead
    I'm actually considering making them on the side and offering them for sale. Casting the housings out of Aluminum and making the gears out of brass. The gears are hard to find, you need a 24 pitch 32-tooth gear with a very wide face like 1/2"

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    I remember reading on another forum that someone got an SB9 (or maybe 10) threading dial printed for him. Didn't last, but would be a good candidate for lost PLA casting - maybe Dan Dubeau would like that as a casting project. Just get some car batteries and you could do it in lead

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    I assume your SB9 has a 1 1/2" 8 spindle thread, just remember that when you think of reverse, it is not bolt up like the 7 x 10.
    Oh, I'm quite aware of that, it's not the D1 chucks that I'm used to. I hate to strain such an old machine, so I very rarely (almost never) use reverse anyway. One thing I learned quickly tho is that the 3-jaw weighs more than it looks! My fingers took the abuse (OUCH)..... since then I set a piece of wood across the ways.

    I'm looking for some way to get a thread dial on it since I mostly work Imperial, but prices on South Bends are insane. So believe it or not I was shopping eBay UK for Boxford thread dials -- even with the shipping they would be far cheaper than the US part. I need something with 32 teeth, 24 pitch for a 3/4-8 lead screw.
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 05-21-2020, 05:48 PM.

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  • old mart
    replied
    I assume your SB9 has a 1 1/2" 8 spindle thread, just remember that when you think of reverse, it is not bolt up like the 7 x 10. The Atlas 12 x 24 which we are doing up to sell at the museum didn't have a decent chuck, so I have donated a 160mm chuck. The reason I want that one on the Atlas is because it only has inside and soft jaws, but it is in new condition. I was never able to find any outside jaws. I bought a CI backplate blank and threaded it 1 1/2 x 8, the same as yours. While I was doing it, I bored the chuck body slightly bigger to about 1.7", and now, a drawbar with a 1.65" end will fit and stop the chuck unscrewing when in reverse. The downside of that mod is the loss of the spindle bore.

    Leave a comment:

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