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  • #61
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    I remember reading on another forum that someone got an SB9 (or maybe 10) threading dial printed for him. Didn't last, but would be a good candidate for lost PLA casting - maybe Dan Dubeau would like that as a casting project. Just get some car batteries and you could do it in lead
    I'm actually considering making them on the side and offering them for sale. Casting the housings out of Aluminum and making the gears out of brass. The gears are hard to find, you need a 24 pitch 32-tooth gear with a very wide face like 1/2"
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #62
      Should be able to make the gear on a tilted Dividing head. I made a 7/8 or so one for a Cadillac power window drive..
      I have same SB 9, same reversing cursing lever for leadscrew, just a tad slower. Also a 3 ft, which is pretty short around 22 inches work length.
      but I have no gears , no gearbox, no 4 way. Tried to make a few parts last year, like 6 pieces.. and I gotta say, I need a 4way index tool post and a carriage handwhhel dial, or long travel indicator to make anything in like 6 or 8 pieces. I got spoiled running my big modern lathe , but it has not been under power the last few years.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by 754 View Post
        Should be able to make the gear on a tilted Dividing head. I made a 7/8 or so one for a Cadillac power window drive..
        I have same SB 9, same reversing cursing lever for leadscrew, just a tad slower. Also a 3 ft, which is pretty short around 22 inches work length.
        I've actually seen guys use a straight cut spur gear, they just tilt the housing a bit. Not original, but effective. My main issue would be getting up some kind of powered spindle to move with the carriage, using the lathe spindle for indexing. There are companies that manufacture gears in the form of long, splined bar stock -- just saw off the thickness of gear that you need and bore it out.

        I just saw an NOS SB9 thread dial on eBay with the original box and everything.... bidding was starting at $250. If I can sell reproductions at half that, and still break even, I would be happy.
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #64
          Thread dial gears are totally non-critical.

          You could stick pins in a piece of wood, or cut one out of a flattened tin can and that would probably work fine for years.

          The Logan has a 16 tooth gear on the dial, that is not even a helical gear, and it works fine. I have a spare SB thread dial that I picked up for 5 bucks that I plan to adapt to the Logan, just to get the 8 divisions, and quarter pitch resolution
          CNC machines only go through the motions.

          Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
          Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
          Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
          I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
          Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

          Comment


          • #65
            the 3-jaw weighs more than it looks! ...then I set a piece of wood across the ways.
            You can improve on that. Chunk of 2x6 underneath, leftover 2x4 scraps cut on bandsaw - if you are careful to set the height you don't even have to lift it for the cam-lock or threaded spindle to line up perfectly. Crude, perhaps, but effective.
            Click image for larger version

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            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • #66
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              Thread dial gears are totally non-critical.

              You could stick pins in a piece of wood, or cut one out of a flattened tin can and that would probably work fine for years.
              Not necessarily -- there is a 3/16 keyway in the lead screw, so any gear that goes against it has to be wide enough to bridge over that without getting all chewed up. I have a sheet of brass that I was going to try, until I thought things through a bit more.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #67
                Originally posted by mickeyf View Post

                You can improve on that. Chunk of 2x6 underneath, leftover 2x4 scraps cut on bandsaw - if you are careful to set the height you don't even have to lift it for the cam-lock or threaded spindle to line up perfectly. Crude, perhaps, but effective.
                Yep, that's on my "someday" to-do list.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #68
                  Somewhere I saw where a guy had no thread dial, so he just put a mark on the leadscrew on left end, at gearbox,
                  Wait for the mark to come around and engage it.

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                  • #69
                    I happen to have an extra South Bend 9" thread dial laying around, some where

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                      Somewhere I saw where a guy had no thread dial, so he just put a mark on the leadscrew on left end, at gearbox,
                      Wait for the mark to come around and engage it.
                      I've heard of that but I can't find the exact story. There's been guys that are way smarter than me....
                      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                        Not necessarily -- there is a 3/16 keyway in the lead screw, so any gear that goes against it has to be wide enough to bridge over that without getting all chewed up. I have a sheet of brass that I was going to try, until I thought things through a bit more.
                        Yeah probably so.... but the gear does not need to be anything special at all.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                          Yeah probably so.... but the gear does not need to be anything special at all.
                          Nope nothing really special about it. Problem is, all the manufacturers have only 1/4" face width. I would rather see like 1/2" face width, thats what it looks like from the pics of originals. Its not a real common gear either -- had to do some searching for 24 pitch 32 teeth. Of all places, Stock Drive Products has it, but the face width is wrong. Neither Boston nor Browning has it in stock. And eBay is a sick joke when searching for gears -- an exercise in frustration.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Well, the tooth form is not a big deal, so just a roughed-out fly cutter ought to do the job, blank indexed with a 32 or 64 tooth gear to get the spacing right. The lathe could make its own gear!

                            SB sold a gear cutting attachment, basically a simple indexer using change type gears, that was held in the milling attachment, I believe. I saw a pic in an old Audels book from 1940..
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 05-22-2020, 01:40 AM.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions.

                            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              Well, the tooth form is not a big deal, so just a roughed-out fly cutter ought to do the job, blank indexed with a 32 or 64 tooth gear to get the spacing right. The lathe could make its own gear!
                              I would *love* to do that... in fact I've already got my steel picked out. Right now I'm just getting to know it with a simple job -- making a new long-nose live center. I haven't even done any accuracy tests yet, doesn't seem to need them. Of course I'm not using the dials at all, just measuring. (the dials are kinda crappy)
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Here is a stone hammer simple setup I made to do bevel gears. Lower gear is the indexing gear. This was made to be swung to each side to do bevels, you would not need that. Screw above gear is pointy and used as the indexer. Looks scary, but I have used it with mill, and before that with a shaper, and it works. Yours would be sturdier, since it does not need to stick up like that. The brass looking thing under the gears is a split cotter to hold the shaft. Next pic is all the parts, including a couple of mandrels for holding the gears.



                                Last edited by J Tiers; 05-22-2020, 01:52 AM.
                                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                                Comment

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