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  • #91
    At this point I'm pretty much going to have to make one.... but the Atlas 10-12" (commercial model) has the correct gear. I may just snag one of those in the future, and make a housing out of bar stock that looks like South Bend.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #92
      Originally posted by 754 View Post
      I had mentioned tilting the gear for cutting, I should also mention, I believe it should be plunge cut, so teeth are curved to fit screw with more contact.. could be wrong , but it won't wear fast.
      That's best for gears with some pressure on the teeth. I have done that, and assume it would be better in most cases, although cutting with a proper worm hob is the best.

      I believe that all the SB thread dials had ordinary helical gears, no plunge cut. There is essentially no pressure and little wear involved.
      CNC machines only go through the motions

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      • #93
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

        That's best for gears with some pressure on the teeth. I have done that, and assume it would be better in most cases, although cutting with a proper worm hob is the best.

        I believe that all the SB thread dials had ordinary helical gears, no plunge cut. There is essentially no pressure and little wear involved.
        I have seen people use ordinary spur gear for them, and tilt the housing a bit to get the helix angle. But the problem for me is finding a gear that is wide enough not to get caught in the keyway and chewed up.
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #94
          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

          I have seen people use ordinary spur gear for them, and tilt the housing a bit to get the helix angle. But the problem for me is finding a gear that is wide enough not to get caught in the keyway and chewed up.
          If one gear is too thin, why not use two doubled up?

          -js
          There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

          Location: SF Bay Area

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          • #95
            Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post

            If one gear is too thin, why not use two doubled up?

            -js
            Yeah its possible but I'd rather avoid that unless I have to.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #96
              Not a big deal, just pin them
              for appearance and to same time, you may want to buy a printed housing, and make or source a gear.
              Last edited by 754; 05-23-2020, 07:00 PM.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by 754 View Post
                Not a big deal, just pin them
                for appearance and to same time, you may want to buy a printed housing, and make or source a gear.
                Yeah, it would sure be easier, but what's the fun in that? I figured source a gear and make the rest. Probably learn a bunch along the way.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #98
                  Congrats. What a great replacement for the 7x10 Asian machine!

                  Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                  Yeah, That goes both ways, the PM guys rag on the HSM guys.
                  And talking about anything chinese or HF will get you kicked out of there.

                  I find the South Bend forum to be the "friendliest" one over there. Also the Antique Machinery one.
                  I don't go in their other forums unless I'm bored and taking the p1$$
                  Definitely some hardasses on PM. But the super knowledgeable and helpful members like John Oder and Hendeyman more than make up for it. So far that PM has been very helpful to me.

                  Originally posted by old mart View Post
                  I assume your SB9 has a 1 1/2" 8 spindle thread, just remember that when you think of reverse, it is not bolt up like the 7 x 10. The Atlas 12 x 24 which we are doing up to sell at the museum didn't have a decent chuck, so I have donated a 160mm chuck. The reason I want that one on the Atlas is because it only has inside and soft jaws, but it is in new condition. I was never able to find any outside jaws. I bought a CI backplate blank and threaded it 1 1/2 x 8, the same as yours. While I was doing it, I bored the chuck body slightly bigger to about 1.7", and now, a drawbar with a 1.65" end will fit and stop the chuck unscrewing when in reverse. The downside of that mod is the loss of the spindle bore.
                  I wish they unscrewed that easy. I had to make a custom tool just to keep from busting a gear one time trying to unscrew one. It could certainly happen on a large diameter interrupted cut, but it's not something that keeps me up at night.
                  21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                  1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                  • #99
                    I had a Taiwan import lathe with a 3/4-8 leadscrew(which should be the same as the SouthBend) but did not have a thread dial. I checked a grizzly 12/24 lathe and was able to buy the gear and the engraved(top part) shaft for about $25. I made the housing out of a blank of Aluminum and it worked great.

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                    • So how much did it cost? Why the secret?
                      Last edited by DR; 06-02-2020, 11:11 PM.

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                      • Originally posted by DR View Post
                        So how much did it cost? Why the secret?
                        Trying to have some respect for the sellers privacy since the original ad is still up on PM. Let's just say that the price was shockingly low (normally stuff like this goes for at least 2x as much if not more). It turned out that his price was not a typo, he was serious, that was his actual price.
                        Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 06-03-2020, 12:17 AM.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          Trying to have some respect for the sellers privacy since the original ad is still up on PM. Let's just say that the price was shockingly low (normally stuff like this goes for at least 2x as much if not more). It turned out that his price was not a typo, he was serious, that was his actual price.
                          Hmmmm....... I guess I don't understand. The price was so low you don't want to embarrass the seller? If he was embarrassed don't you think he would have deleted his posting?

                          Just curious, does the 1945 spindle run in cast iron or does it have bronze alloy bearing inserts like the newer models. If cast iron I probably would have passed on the machine unless I was buying for re$ale profit.

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