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What does this "socket" fit ?

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  • ikdor
    replied
    A better security bolt would be to stick a socket head cap screw into a recess and press a ceramic ball into the hole.

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    A really effective security bolt would be to drill out the socket of a hardened SHCS using a carbide drill. Only way to get it out would be to drill the head off or weld a screw onto the head.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    Oh yeah, I remember now. Thanks for helping me relive a nightmare.
    Whoops, didn't mean to.... those manifold bolts were right around the time I learned to really use a torch. Cast iron doesn't cut, you can "wash" the bolts right out of the holes in the heads and then just chase em with a tap after it all cools off. Main thing is not to light the rest of the greasy lump on fire.

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  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    Ya, we had some issues with the Triton plugs in our fleet. The method I used was to run the truck into the shop on Friday afternoon, and while still warm, Crack each plug about 1/4 turn and pour a teaspoon or so of Kroil in the sparkplug bore. Monday, they'd come right out.

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  • CCWKen
    replied
    Oh yeah, I remember now. Thanks for helping me relive a nightmare.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    I think it was Chevy that had security spark plugs some years back. They just broke-off when you tried to remove them.
    Ford Triton engines have a special kit just for busted off plugs, they are infamous for it. Chevy was the busted off manifold bolts. You remember when they had special wrenches with 3 different bends in them?

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    I think it was Chevy that had security spark plugs some years back. They just broke-off when you tried to remove them.
    Torque to yield fasteners are common in automobiles so torque to shear is the next logical step. Shear-head bolts and nuts are actually quite common in some products like powerline extensions/couplers.

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  • CCWKen
    replied
    I think it was Chevy that had security spark plugs some years back. They just broke-off when you tried to remove them.

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  • Georgineer
    replied
    Of course, if you filed the lump off after installing one of these screws, it would make a very effective security screw...

    George B.

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  • old mart
    replied
    There are so many variations, it blows your mind.

    https://www.instructables.com/id/Whe...ot-a-Phillips/

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  • lynnl
    replied
    The big question is Why? What purpose or application is that serving, that could not be served as well or better by some far more orthodox fastener? The classic solution in search of a problem.

    Having the engagement features raised like that would seem to make them more susceptible to damage.
    Last edited by lynnl; 05-21-2020, 11:37 AM.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    I certainly never have. I would assume they are always used in a recess, since the pointy Phillips part would be a nasty item to have poking out of some surface. Also it would be subject to damage rendering it not possible to remove.

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  • mklotz
    replied
    Thanks for the information, Paul.

    The shape on the left is the 4 mm hex that all the bits have; it is these hex ends that fit into the magnetic sockets on all the handles.

    Your URL shows exactly the same tool kit that I have. Apparently the individual who submitted the question had the same confusion about this bit that I had.

    The screw head you show (convex Phillips ?) is has exactly the shape that this socket would fit. The shape would certainly serve as a security feature.

    I've never seen screws of this type; have you?

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    What is the shape on the left side?

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Female_Phillips.JPG
Views:	307
Size:	69.5 KB
ID:	1876519 Oh, now I see that it is just a 1/4" hex. It looked like the brown facet was a tapered slot.

    Here is the answer: https://diy.stackexchange.com/questi...crewdriver-bit

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Inverted_Phillips.jpg
Views:	298
Size:	11.0 KB
ID:	1876520

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  • BCRider
    replied
    I'm sort of thinking that it's some new seldom seen sort of security fastener too. Otherwise it's just WAY too Rube Goldberg'ish…..

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