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RFC: Brown & Sharpe clamp

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  • RFC: Brown & Sharpe clamp

    So I'm cleaning up a 2 1/2 inch Brown & Sharpe toolmakers clamp and lost the screw that holds the retainer because of course I did. Anyone know what the thread size of the little bugger is?

    TIA.

  • #2
    You don't have any small set screws you can try with it?

    If you don't have anything that small perhaps see what size number drill fits in the hole as a "tap drill" which would suggest the body size of the screw at least. Then you can figure out the thread pitch.

    And in the mean time call out the National Guard and cordon off the area with "Accident Scene" tape and conduct a thorough sweep of the area and fine inspection of the big pile of debris? Or did you do that already?
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #3
      Got a big magnet you can go over the area with? Worse comes to worst in that case I go to the hardware store and use their thread checkers to get a new one -- Ace is pretty good about that.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BCRider View Post
        And in the mean time call out the National Guard and cordon off the area with "Accident Scene" tape and conduct a thorough sweep of the area and fine inspection of the big pile of debris? Or did you do that already?
        iI wouldn't do a sweep, I'd empty the shop vac, clean the filer and thoroughly vacuum the area, bench, floor, under the bench and cabinets. examine the crime scene evidence collected with a magnet. It should be in there.

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        • #5
          Seems about every time I see a small screw called for, more often than not it's a 4-40. I'd try that.
          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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          • #6
            Try turning in a toothpick, see if you can figure out the pitch, then make a few up.
            I was trying to find the pitch of an internal thread on a Coleman stove part that way, but could not get a reading, way down in the hole. If it's flush it should work I think..

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            • #7
              Brown and Sharpe made their own screws and used odd threads.
              In my #13 grinder, I have some 14-24 thread screws. Madness.

              -Doozer
              DZER

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              • #8
                I have some 2-56 nylon screws for R/C servos and one seems to fit. This is a very small screw- I don't think the local hardware will be able to cover it, but I'm going to try tomorrow. My usual source for small fasteners is the local hobby shop, which is closed for the duration.

                Again, this is a tiny pan head screw- a fly may have swiped it.

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                • #9
                  Brown and Sharpe made their own screws and used odd threads.
                  In my #13 grinder, I have some 14-24 thread screws. Madness.
                  Yeah, I was going to say, the "try a few" only works if it's a standard screw. good luck.
                  "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                    Brown and Sharpe made their own screws and used odd threads.
                    In my #13 grinder, I have some 14-24 thread screws. Madness.

                    -Doozer
                    Wait a minute.....
                    .242 major dia with 24 TPI ?????
                    Thats Just Evil.

                    I did some digging and it turns out that both Hardinge and K&T used them too.
                    But it hasn't been a part of any standard since 1975.
                    I could easily mistake that for 1/4-28 and really have a bad day...

                    FWIW google says that Ford used them to retain the ring gear on the Model T.
                    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 05-22-2020, 05:24 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Looks like 2 - 64. And what a PIA.. I had one B&S clamp ( all are Starrett) , removed the tiny pan head screw and mic'ed , thread gage difficult on old eyes. When reinstalling, half the screw head popped off,.. too hard. So now I too will be looking for a replacement screw. ( No good deed goes unpunished, it seems!)
                      Joe B

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JoeCB View Post
                        Looks like 2 - 64. And what a PIA.. I had one B&S clamp ( all are Starrett) , removed the tiny pan head screw and mic'ed , thread gage difficult on old eyes. When reinstalling, half the screw head popped off,.. too hard. So now I too will be looking for a replacement screw. ( No good deed goes unpunished, it seems!)
                        Joe B
                        Arrrgh! Sorry about that! 2-64, what were they thinking?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post

                          Arrrgh! Sorry about that! 2-64, what were they thinking?
                          They were thinking, "Let's make it so only we can service our products" because they weren't making enough margin on $150 micrometers. (Each)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                            They were thinking, "Let's make it so only we can service our products" because they weren't making enough margin on $150 micrometers. (Each)
                            Not really .....Thread Standards did not appear in the USA until 1906 and Starrett, Brown & Sharpe and others had been in business for many years before that
                            The Standards were aimed at 'New Products" so the old company standards stayed .
                            Think that is wrong ? well, what happened in 1950 when the USA adopted metric thread standards ...why don't we have that after 70 years ?
                            So if you have a product line and the government comes out and sets new criteria,with no date, what is the incentive to change. You have the tooling and assembly tools already
                            it's called a waste of money..For example....If all the steel being sold says " made to be machined with carbide " would you throw away your HSS Tooling ?
                            Of course not ! why ?
                            Brown & Sharpe has a tool that has been used for 140 years ...why change it, it works and they have the tooling

                            Lastly , something we seldom see anymore. It's a Machinist properly called a 'Tool and Die " maker
                            In the "Old" days , he was the guy that made threading dies and taps among many other things. He was the king in the shop for all tooling
                            So if he made a 7/16 x 28 taps dies for a product , they used it because they didn't have mill suppliers like Mc Master Carr, or MSC to supply them
                            As those products die off,those personal standards will dis-appear and conformity with"Market availability" becomes the guide because companies do not have these T & D guys anymore

                            Rich
                            Green Bay, WI

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                            • #15
                              SAE didn't put out it's first standard until 1932 or there abouts. And it wasn't even about threads. Ford used a lot of strange (to current users) threads until well into the 30's. The flywheel magnet mounts on Model Ts were a #14-28 brass screw. A lot of those were mistaken for 1/4-28. Many were re-taped to 1/4-20 causing many headaches for later restorers. ...Damn them guys!

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