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  • OT: Nice neighborhoods

    I have no idea what sort of neighborhood most folks here live in, I like where I live a lot.

    Just last night, we had a symphony concert followed by a get-together (with proper distancing) as a birthday party for a neighbor who recently recovered from the virus.

    The concert was because one of the neighbors is assistant principal french horn for the St Louis Symphony, and he has been organizing outdoor concerts on his front lawn of various sorts every night at 6PM through this virus mess. Last night it was Wagner's "Triebschen Idyll" followed by a Mozart piece, with a dozen or so of his fellow musicians. Tuesdays it is Irish music, etc.

    Pretty much everyone here knows each other, and (at least until this current mess) we often get together, with things like "progressive dinners" where the party moves from house to house for appetizers, main course and desserts, etc.

    I know many live outside of town, but do any of the rest of you live in neighborhoods where everyone knows each other and folks get together often?
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    we know each other and hate each other.

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    • #3
      I'm in a neighborhood. Our yard (about an acre) adjoins seven other mostly smaller yards, and we often do stuff with those neighbors. This morning one of them cut our grass, our kids are playing with the kid of another, I used a chainsaw belonging to another, and I'll probably stroll down and say hi at least once this weekend to another whose kids I have spent a lot of time with over the past years and who do stuff with our kids. That leaves one guy who we rarely see (young doctor at local hospital), a military guy who is actually the closest one that I chatted with a few days ago but don't regularly see that often, and an empty house belonging to someone I know whose boyfriend is a customer of mine.

      Tomorrow afternoon some friends are coming over to play music on the back porch.

      It's great.

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      • #4
        We have a nice neighborhood, built up in the 1970s, but it's become somewhat stratified. Us old timers all know each other well enough to ask how the grand kids are doing. Those with school age kids tend to associate with each other more. All of the newest neighbors seem to be Silicon Valley commuters, so they leave early and come home late. They are seldom outside the house during daylight long enough to get to know them. So there are essentially 3 or 4 distinct communities.

        We are taking the "shelter in place" more seriously than most. No "get togethers" and the only visiting has been in conjunction with helping a neighbor in need. Many of the younger folks jog past every day, and a lot of the old folks are still walking a few miles every day per Dr's orders. They tend to stop to chat a few minutes as they pass. It's kind of funny to watch a group of senior citizens with hearing problems try to hold a conversation while wearing masks and standing 6 feet away from each other. I've learned that a lot of us appear to do some small amount of lip reading.

        Dan
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

        Location: SF East Bay.

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        • #5
          I can definitely relate to the hearing issues.
          “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

          Lewis Grizzard

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          • #6
            My immediate neighborhood consists of a couple dozen old houses on plats of land 1/2 to several acres, and has a rural flavor, although it is only 1/4 mile from typical suburbs with shopping centers and apartments. Immediately behind my house is the development of Springdale, where there are several hundred family homes. It borders on the Loch Raven watershed property. The original town of Warren, built around a cotton mill on the Gunpowder River, was flooded in 1922 when the city built a larger dam to meet the needs of the growing city of Baltimore. My houses were built around 1877, and they sit at an elevation perhaps 50 ft above the Loch Raven reservoir. Some houses are older, perhaps dating back to the 18th century, and others are probably 1950 vintage or so. I am friendly with my neighbors, but we pretty much keep to ourselves. I bought my first house here in 1977, then an adjacent 1 acre lot in 1982, and the house I am living in in 1989.

            Here is a slideshow/video of the neighborhood from last April and May, when the bridge was closed for repairs and the road had local traffic only. Otherwise it is a dangerous speedway for crazy drivers.

            Last edited by PStechPaul; Yesterday, 03:41 PM.
            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

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            • #7
              I live on 15 acres 30 miles outside of St. Louis and know almost all my neighbors mostly because they have found out I can solve most of their mechanical problems. If I were in St L. proper I wouldn't even come out of my house for fear of being struck by a stray bullet from a drive by shooting.
              A few of us get together at local dining establishments.
              People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

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              • #8
                I don't live in the City, but I know those who live in actual St Louis. The problems are in a few known areas. The rest of the place is fine, and some areas that used to be problems have changed drastically to be much better.

                Our get-togethers have indeed been a bit hampered by "social distancing", but we get by. The concert players were all at the proper distance, with the brass etc farther apart. The violins have less risk of airborne droplets than woodwinds and some of the brass instruments.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #9
                  Well, I grew up like that, and enjoyed it greatly. But that was a long time ago, and I miss it. Today I live in a post-industrial apocalytic wasteland of drug abuse, hopelessness and violence. Two of my immediate neighbors are great, my little corner is OK but I hope my entire state burns to the ground.

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                  • #10
                    I miss that sense of community. I grew up in a small town, lots of neighbor interaction, and us kids had the complete run of the place. Dad still lives there, but it's sooooo much different now. All the new people that moved there don't even wave anymore, there's only still a few old people hanging on from when I remember it. I still take the kids there for halloween, and a few of the parents of the kids I grew up with still invite us into the house for a visit. They all load up the kids bags with candy because all the houses are so far apart in that subdivision, that no kids come anymore.

                    I moved about 15 minutes north east to the country. We're on 40 acres, but do have a house across the road from us. None of the neighbors are social, a couple I've never even talked to besides introducing ourselves when we moved in 10 years ago. I'll get the odd wave as they drive by, but If I don't initiate, it doesn't happen. Doesn't really bother me, as we're pretty introverted people, but still, wouldn't mind sharing a driveway beer with one a time or two lol. Did have a young guy move a couple houses down about 5 years ago, and we've got together a few times, but we're all so busy our schedules never line up.

                    There was more community feel when I lived downtown Toronto. Although I never met the neighbors on either side of us, I did get to know several people in the building.

                    Was out in the garden today and the neighbor across the road was out too, I waved and said Hi, as did he, but If I didn't wave first he wouldn't have. That's the extent out our interaction lol.

                    It's really the only thing I miss about town life, although I'm well aware that its not always great if you've got an asshole neighbor. Hmmmm, maybe I'M the asshole neighbor......

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                      I miss that sense of community. I grew up in a small town, lots of neighbor interaction, and us kids had the complete run of the place. Dad still lives there, but it's sooooo much different now. All the new people that moved there don't even wave anymore, there's only still a few old people hanging on from when I remember it. I still take the kids there for halloween, and a few of the parents of the kids I grew up with still invite us into the house for a visit. They all load up the kids bags with candy because all the houses are so far apart in that subdivision, that no kids come anymore.
                      ..........
                      There was more community feel when I lived downtown Toronto. Although I never met the neighbors on either side of us, I did get to know several people in the building.

                      Ever go south of the border for shopping? That's where I am, about an hour south of Toronto. Grew up in Lewiston NY, beautiful little village... except it isn't so little any more. Used to be two stop lights, pop. 5,000 counting dogs. Now days its yuppie heaven you can't afford to even look at the place, pop. 40K and nobody lets their dogs run loose any more. 8 stop lights and counting. Kids spoiled rotten, where are all the veggie gardens, police force doubled. Nobody says hello any more. Way too many Mercedes and BMW's there, used to be news if you saw one all year. Windows rolled up and air condition blasting on the perfectly tanned blonde trophy housewives. Great place to be a rich tourist in the summers, they always have some kind of festival almost every other day. Wouldn't want to live there any more.

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                      • #12
                        My ex was from St.Louis, her fraternal grand parents lived in Riverside and the maternal side a bit north of that. They were both very nice clean blue collar neighborhoods filled with wonderful people. That was 40 years ago, today I don't think I would even get off of the interstate anywhere inside the beltway.

                        I grew up on the edge of Cincinnati with either a farm or 2000 acre wooded county park as a backyard. While married I lived in a typical suburb, small 60' wide lot where I sat on my back porch and looked at my neighbor behind me sitting on his back porch 75' away, absolutely hated it.

                        Post divorce I bought a 5 acre lot in the county about 7 miles from a college town, 10 miles in the other direction to moderate size city and 15 minutes to the lake where I do my sailing. The neighbor across the street raises various animals (currently goats), next door has Alpacas and horses (grandkids like to visit them) and on the other side just a couple of dogs. He comes over every time that something doesn't start or breaks as his mechanical knowledge ends at operating a retractable ink pen.

                        There is an old saying which I don't remember exactly but it is something like "ideal neighbors are close enough for a friendly wave but too far away for casual conversation". My kind of place but then again I would start getting anxious when I had to attend meetings where we were crowded together in rooms, my personal space is pretty big.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          Ever go south of the border for shopping? That's where I am, about an hour south of Toronto. Grew up in Lewiston NY, beautiful little village... except it isn't so little any more. Used to be two stop lights, pop. 5,000 counting dogs. Now days its yuppie heaven you can't afford to even look at the place, pop. 40K and nobody lets their dogs run loose any more. 8 stop lights and counting. Kids spoiled rotten, where are all the veggie gardens, police force doubled. Nobody says hello any more. Way too many Mercedes and BMW's there, used to be news if you saw one all year. Windows rolled up and air condition blasting on the perfectly tanned blonde trophy housewives. Great place to be a rich tourist in the summers, they always have some kind of festival almost every other day. Wouldn't want to live there any more.


                          Newcastle (where I grew up) is almost straight north of Lewiston across the lake, about an hour east of Toronto. It's just the city creep moving east in search of cheap land to build cookie cutter houses on. The rest of the town bears almost no resemblence to when I grew up, and has more than doubled in size and still growing. One stop light in the center has now grown to 4, and all the farm land surrounding it is being developed. It's nicer in some ways having the money move in, as it brings amenities but it loses it's "charm" if that's what you call it. It's still the closest town with a draught tower so they still get my beer and wing money, but aside from that I only go there to visit Dad. I don't feel a connection at all anymore. Lewiston sounds the same. I don't know where you'd have to move to get that feeling back, but I'm not sure it's geographical anymore, it's just a changing of the times.

                          The new toll hwy 407 extension just linked up to the hwy down the road from me, so that is likely to bring more city people out to the country as commuting into Toronto is much easier now. I only have to make it another 15-20 years then I'm off to a lake somewhere. Judging how fast the last 10 years have gone by I think I can hold on till then, and hopefully it just jacks the house prices up.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                            Well, I grew up like that, and enjoyed it greatly. But that was a long time ago, and I miss it. Today I live in a post-industrial apocalytic wasteland of drug abuse, hopelessness and violence. Two of my immediate neighbors are great, my little corner is OK but I hope my entire state burns to the ground.
                            You have good reason to feel that way.
                            Dictator Cuomo has decimated Bufflhole and all of CNY.


                            JL...............

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                              You have good reason to feel that way.
                              Dictator Cuomo has decimated Bufflhole and all of CNY.


                              JL...............
                              Nah, the rot started *long* before that.... they've just been perfecting it. At least it was tolerable back when we had some industry. Now its just the Rust Belt, lawyers, and hopelessness. Too bad the countryside is so beautiful, its getting to where "normal" people can't hardly live here any more. Much like what Chicago does to Illinois.

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