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Skyhook, I'm not a believer

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  • #76
    I think some are overthinking the whole deal. It's for big machines, not Atlas or Southbend 9". Lift chucks, or maybe workpieces. Big machines have larger sized compounds, and lots of cast iron area to carry the shear load. And, my use of 1.75 inches distance for the leverage is ridiculously conservative, the "foot" will extend farther over and the minimum lever is more likely to be 2 1/2" or more, cutting the leverage down to perhaps 8 or 9 x instead of 12x.

    For the target machines, there is no problem. To need to lift 500 lb onto or off of a lathe, it is probable that the lathe will weigh several thousand lb, with a compound that weighs as much as or more than the whole headstock of a hobby machine such as an Atlas.


    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

    Good as long as we don't have the "Monarchist" from PM to write his riddles in here.
    I think he had 3 screen names, he's back to just "Thermite" now, sometimes known as "Termite". He's a bit of a "post pest", but I've bought some stuff from him, and he's much easier to take outside of his posts.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 05-29-2020, 12:40 AM.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • #77
      Click image for larger version

Name:	skyhook.jpg
Views:	144
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ID:	1878144 This is a crane that I built for a friend's Putnam pattern maker's lathe. It is on a separate mounting plate and is used to pick large pieces up and mount on the spindle. We considered adding a small winch, but found that was not necessary. This could have been easily modified to go on an engine lathe. The total cost was under $200.
      Grantham, New Hampshire

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      • #78
        Originally posted by CPeter View Post
        Click image for larger version  Name:	skyhook.jpg Views:	0 Size:	156.1 KB ID:	1878144 .

        That's what I'm talking about. We are shop people. Get busy and MAKE SOMETHING ! !! ! !! ! !! !
        If you can not or choose not to afford something, then BUILD IT !! ! !! ! !! !
        Kick azz !!!

        --Doozer
        DZER

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        • #79
          My old firm had lots of these in widely varying capacities:

          https://www.liftingequipmentstore.co...b-crane-2m-arm

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          • #80
            CPeter, the odd granular nature of your picture and the odd design of the lathe at first made me see it as a table top clock maker's size of lathe. Then other features showed it to be a big floor lathe like it should be. But then some other details like the big hand wheel below the bed and oversize hand wheels made me thing table top again. It's very confusing....

            Doozer, totally agree on the HSM'er trait of making our own.

            Also we're a.... well, let's just say that we're a more mature bunch. Sounds so much better than some other options. Some of us might have back issues or arthritis to where a little help even with a 6 inch chuck or 4 inch vise would be welcome. The earlier post about the big 15" lathe and 40lb personal lift limit comes to mind. Such a limit on lifting in a shop that NEEDS a 15" lathe suggests that compact lifting devices like we're looking at in this thread should be at almost every work station.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #81
              It is 2,200 pounds of lathe. The hand wheel below the bed it to move the sliding bed away from the gap. Total between centers is 12 feet. Swing over the gap is 50 inches. Putnam used this same basic machine as an engine lathe. The bed has the pyramid ways and a carriage, but there is no power feed. Lifting capacity of the crane it self is 1,000 pounds as I remember it. The arm extends to about 3 feet and is hydraulically moved. In use, the hook is spotted to the final position of the lift and the piece is picked off the floor and swung into place. The addition of the winch would allow for more flexibility in the lift and if I was to make one for my Clausing, I would add the winch. The arm is long enough to put the base behind the tailstock 99% of the time.
              Peter
              Grantham, New Hampshire

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              • #82
                2200lbs of lathe with a swing of 50 inches and 12 feet between centres would blow away in a light breeze. The lathe I use weighs 1440 pounds and is a 9 X 20.

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by old mart View Post
                  2200lbs of lathe with a swing of 50 inches and 12 feet between centres would blow away in a light breeze. The lathe I use weighs 1440 pounds and is a 9 X 20.
                  It's a WOOD lathe, remember....... (Pattern maker's)
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #84
                    CPeter, oh I realize that. And a grand thing it is... .but the way that picture looks for some odd reason along with the scale of the controls.... Just makes my mind see something other than what I know it really is...…
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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