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Barter: Service. XRF One of you folks have avalible?

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  • #16
    something has to be able to cut it. Can you file it? Do you have a diamond saw - nip a corner off.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
      something has to be able to cut it. Can you file it? Do you have a diamond saw - nip a corner off.
      If its heavy like tungsten carbide and hard like tungsten carbide it probably is...tungsten carbide 🤣
      I`m not sure if XRF is able to do anything else than confirm the guestimate in this case.

      Diamond cut off wheel on angle grinder should get you a sample from one corner. takes couple of minutes to chew trough 3/8” solid carbide endmill.
      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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      • #18
        If it is, it's worth decent money for scrap.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
          something has to be able to cut it. Can you file it? Do you have a diamond saw - nip a corner off.
          Good point. I do have even machine tools that can machine it.

          I would not rather machine the bunk off and make what shape?

          Thats up to you bunch of smart folks. Thats not a joke.

          What do you do with a 20lb hunk of metal?

          I was thinking a type of rock crusher and these for 20lb slugs take all the hit.

          I think that is what they were made for?

          Terax or something. It was surplus auction stuff.

          I think it can survive a rock crusher, small one. For dirt gold mining in the dirt.

          Solly. Hate to turn this stuff in for scrap. I think its purposes is formed.

          Pretty skock proof. Oh well.

          Thats all the info I have.

          I HATE scraping stuff. JR

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          • #20
            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

            If its heavy like tungsten carbide and hard like tungsten carbide it probably is...tungsten carbide 🤣
            I`m not sure if XRF is able to do anything else than confirm the guestimate in this case.
            Very good point, kinda had a thought.

            I was looking for an Xrf unit to tell me what is in the lumps. That was stupid on my part.

            Not if its 1018 or 4140.

            Whats in HSS? Like asking that. Solly. JR

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JRouche View Post

              Very good point, kinda had a thought.

              I was looking for an Xrf unit to tell me what is in the lumps. That was stupid on my part.

              Not if its 1018 or 4140.

              Whats in HSS? Like asking that. Solly. JR
              HSS has only a slightly higher density than ordinary steel.
              If you take exact measurements to fiqure out density and test it with magnet and grinder we can probably give you pretty good guess what it is.
              Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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              • #22
                You might be able to test it for HSS by heating a piece of it to red-hot, let it cool, and check hardness. HSS should keep its hardness, while ordinary steel will be annealed. Carbide could be determined by a simple hardness test using a carbide scribe or lathe tool. The exact grade of carbide might be more difficult to determine, but maybe you can cut some chunks off and use diamond tooling to make inserts, which could then be tested against known carbide inserts. You could make a lot of inserts with those big chunks, but probably would not be worth the time and effort.
                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • #23
                  OK I've been reading the posts, now I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed sometimes, at least that is what I'm told, what about a chemical test of some kind? I do not know if this is even possible but I thought I'd toss it out there. I'll assume the spark test has been tried.

                  TX
                  Mr fixit for the family
                  Chris

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                    HSS has only a slightly higher density than ordinary steel.
                    If you take exact measurements to fiqure out density and test it with magnet and grinder we can probably give you pretty good guess what it is.
                    No.. Jimminy.. Why have you brains not figured out the approximate mass?

                    I gave you dimensions and weight. What more do you need? Nadda. JR

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                    • #25
                      Oh crap. II think I listed it at 10lb per 12"x2"x2" bar?

                      Yeah... I miss spoke. They are 20 pounds each, same dims. Solly. JR

                      P.S. That should give some clarity. I think they were meant for a hammer mill? I dont know?

                      I dont want to chit can it to the scrapper.

                      I want to use it. JR
                      Last edited by JRouche; 06-05-2020, 02:20 AM.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                        Oh crap. II think I listed it at 10lb per 12"x2"x2" bar?

                        Yeah... I miss spoke. They are 20 pounds each, same dims. Solly. JR
                        How exact are those numbers? volume calculation goes belly up pretty fast if all the measurements are off. And are the parts straight and square, ?

                        Asking because 786.57 cubic centimeters and 9072grams .. 11.5g/cm3 which is bit low for tungsten carbide and way too high for HSS.
                        11.9x1.9x1.9" would give 12.9 gm/cm3 density.

                        Big chunks like that I might suspect wear blocks or die making variety of sintered tungsten carbide. C17 grade cold heading dies or something like that. http://www.allaboutcementedcarbide.c...rbide/density/
                        http://www.michigancarbide.com/products.html

                        For example:
                        GRADE: MC-25

                        This grade is recommended for heavy impact applications and helps to reduce galling. Typical applications are: heading dies, cold extrusion dies, heavy blanking dies and punches.

                        WEIGHT COMPOSITION:
                        Tungsten Carbide W.C. 75%
                        Cobalt Co. 25%
                        PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:
                        Hardness: 83.5 R.A.
                        Density: 13.10 g/c.c.
                        Transverse Rupture: 375,000 P.S.I.
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
                          OK I've been reading the posts, now I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed sometimes, at least that is what I'm told, what about a chemical test of some kind? I do not know if this is even possible but I thought I'd toss it out there. I'll assume the spark test has been tried.

                          TX
                          Mr fixit for the family
                          Chris
                          Well thats funny, not haha but umm? I have not.

                          I dont like spark tests cause my vision is not great.

                          Nver thought about a spark test! Im in. What should I use as the abrasive and can I make a 15sec vid to post here with the results?

                          Now thats fun. Never did a spark test on carbide cause they are usually formed. Not these guys. Just a 20lbs chunk.

                          I will do the spark test as per yer request. Thanks for the insight. JR

                          P.S. Chemical? Just like most other Iron Alloys it will rust, very slowly.

                          Umm? Yeah I put everything from muriatic acid to red devil lye. It didnt move. (Kids, Never do what I do).

                          And I "lyed" about the rust part. Never seen a spec on them and everything rusts here. They are magnetic.

                          I want to make some kinda rock crusher with them, small one.

                          Just an idea. I hate throwing chit away. JR
                          Last edited by JRouche; 06-06-2020, 12:19 AM.

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