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Ripping off Paul Alciatore

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  • Ripping off Paul Alciatore

    I discovered a while back that Paul had a lathe similar to mine, and had made some accessories and improvements to it. Naturally I ripped off his excellent ideas. Unfortunately my version is not nearly as skillful nor as pretty as his, but it certainly works well!

    First was his milling table for the South Bend 9" lathe. How my lathe normally looks:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	normal-setup.JPG Views:	20 Size:	291.1 KB ID:	1878491

    ...And with the compound/top slide removed. I had long since decided that the milling attachment for these lathes is just no good, and all milling should be done directly on the cross slide for reasons of rigidity:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	cross-slide.JPG Views:	19 Size:	322.2 KB ID:	1878492

    It removes easily enough, just a couple of set screws and lift it up. This gives a nice large flat spot to mount things like this:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	mill-table.JPG Views:	20 Size:	318.1 KB ID:	1878493

    All holes are drilled and tapped thru, 5/16-18. The slab of steel is an offcut from a 10" wide flange beam, about 5/8 thick. Table measures 4-1/2 X 9". I figured it all so that the spindle has almost full coverage of the table. It fastens with its own dovetail plug, just like the factory compound/top slide:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	dovetail-plug.JPG Views:	19 Size:	280.8 KB ID:	1878494

    All work was done on the lathe itself. The larger countersinks are for clearance, to clear the top of the cross slide nut. The dovetail plug simply screws into any of the table holes, it's drilled and tapped the same. I suppose I should pin it too, to prevent twisting the table out of line.

    Thanks, Paul! I bought a 3 foot chunk of 5/16-18 threaded rod, and a dozen flanged nuts at the local Ace hardware for $10. Worlds cheapest clamping kit. So far, that's all this has cost me, besides a couple hrs time.

    He also has a fly cutter for the south bend, in which the tool path circumference is equal to one foot. It makes the SFM calculations particularly easy. I may have to wait till I have a threading dial to try that one.
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 05-31-2020, 03:16 PM. Reason: typos

  • #2
    don't forget about this:
    I tried that but my logan leaves a dovetail on the saddle.
    the SB is easier to deal with

    ​​​​​​https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...1664&category=

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
      ....

      All holes are drilled and tapped thru, 5/26-18. The slab of steel is an offcut from a 10" wide flange beam, about 5/8 thick.

      (snip)...

      I bought a 3 foot chunk of 5/15-18 threaded rod, and a dozen flanged nuts at the local Ace hardware for $10. Worlds cheapest clamping kit. So far, that's all this has cost me, besides a couple hrs time.
      My goodness! ... 5/26-18 taps, and 5/15-18 threaded rod!

      Nickel-city, your Ace Hardware is well stocked. They must have about anything a man could want.
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lynnl View Post

        My goodness! ... 5/26-18 taps, and 5/15-18 threaded rod!

        Nickel-city, your Ace Hardware is well stocked. They must have about anything a man could want.
        Thx for the heads-up typos...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by lynnl View Post

          My goodness! ... 5/26-18 taps, and 5/15-18 threaded rod!
          I respect a man who beats to his own drummer. don't try to tie me down with bloody restrictive standards!
          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ringo View Post
            don't forget about this:
            I tried that but my logan leaves a dovetail on the saddle.
            the SB is easier to deal with

            ​​​​​​https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...1664&category=
            OOOOoooooohhhh THANK YOU!!!!! I wish I had known about that, not that I have the money any more..... definitely going on my list though.

            Comment


            • #7
              That's a nice table. But what now? I'm guessing that next up is a good sturdy angle plate so you can mount stuff to be milled to the vertical face? Or is there some other form of "Chapter 2" coming?

              Certainly a big part of any milling in the lathe is going to be better holding. So this plate is a good start.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                That's a nice table. But what now? I'm guessing that next up is a good sturdy angle plate so you can mount stuff to be milled to the vertical face? Or is there some other form of "Chapter 2" coming?
                I think for now just strap clamps or clamp bars and risers. I do have a small grinding vise, and the Palmgren milling vise that I could attach in various ways. But then Ringo posted that t-slot table that has almost the same overall dimensions, so I'm re-thinking the whole thing already!

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                • #9
                  How is z axis (vertical) travel achieved? Or even z axis alignment for that matter - bump adjust?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
                    How is z axis (vertical) travel achieved? Or even z axis alignment for that matter - bump adjust?
                    Well, I was taught the Z is always in the direction of the spindle -- so you could use the carriage handwheel, I suppose. But I would rather lock the carriage and just use the cross slide. If you have to adjust the height of the part relative to the spindle centerline, you could either block it up and clamp it, or use a vise laying on its side.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      I think for now just strap clamps or clamp bars and risers. I do have a small grinding vise, and the Palmgren milling vise that I could attach in various ways. But then Ringo posted that t-slot table that has almost the same overall dimensions, so I'm re-thinking the whole thing already!
                      Yes, but you already made the table you have and it'll work just fine. It would be different if you hadn't started.

                      Thinking about this my mind was trying to work around an heavy angle plate on the cross slide as a companion to the table. Use the plate for where appropriate and the angle plate for where a vertical face would make life easier.

                      But how to set the height AND ensure the part is in line with the motion? Got me thinking that if a little toolmaker's vise were used and a couple of spots for a fence that sat truly parallel and vertical were included you could lightly clamp the vise against the true fence than bump it this way or that along the fence to dial in to the right height for the job. Or perhaps this is a place where adjustable parallels would come in handy?

                      I'm sure glad I have a mill... that's all too much figuring....
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #12
                        what about this:

                        ​​​​​​https://www.ebay.com/itm/Lathe-Verti...0AAOSwd5Vc8gXr

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                          Oh, now yer just rubbing it in.... yeah, I saw those. Dunno if they'll ship to the USA right now tho. It took 5 weeks just to get something from the UK. I've been waiting since March for some CCMT inserts from BangGood.

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                          • #14
                            yeah, I dunno about the quality on that either, it is import, but not chineseium. it is Indieium.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                              yeah, I dunno about the quality on that either, it is import, but not chineseium. it is Indieium.
                              Yeah its can be even more of a gamble. Problem I have is that *all* of the ebay sellers from china and india all of a sudden are away, or gonna take a month, or something. Even in "normal" times it took forever to get something from there.

                              Couple years ago, I got real interested in British screw threads (expensive....) so I thought I would get a deal buying taps and dies from India... Quality was so-so, (carbon steel taps equal to what you could find in a US car parts store) the price was *very* cheap, but the shipping took like 3 months. The Brits actually have some very nice tool stores, and very nice tools, but their tap sets were starting at like $250 which wasn't gonna happen...

                              Its a good bet I'm the only guy in the county with a full set of Whitworth and BSF tho....
                              Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 05-31-2020, 11:17 PM.

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