Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Drill Driver Bits?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Wera makes the best ones by a country mile.
    www.thecogwheel.net

    Comment


    • #17
      Wera is also my favourite. They also make the cutest mini wrench for the bits, the zyklop mini.

      Comment


      • #18
        I have to make an admission. I bought a set of 1/4" hex drive drills at Harbor Freight. When I got them home and spun one, I was shocked at the runout. But it turned out the hex part just wasn't parallel with the drill. I went through and straightened the set, and since then I've used it for all kinds of jobs and have most certainly got my money's worth out of them.

        metalmagpie

        Comment


        • #19
          I have gone to McMaster for new and replacement driver bits. They will have almost any driver bit you may want plus accessories like extensions. Their stuff is usually good quality. That being said, things like the straight slot and Phillips screwdriver bits are usually considered expendables.

          A week or two ago I got some new Phillips bits and some hex socket bits from them. All appear to be good quality.

          As for those drill bits with hex shanks, I personally do not like them. They always seem to break at the juncture of the round and hex sections. But McMaster also has them in fractional sizes ranging 1/16" to 1/2".

          https://www.mcmaster.com/drill-bits/...nk-drill-bits/

          They are not cheap, but not over priced either.
          Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 06-05-2020, 12:35 AM.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
            As for those drill bits with hex shanks, I personally do not like them. They always seem to break at the juncture of the round and hex sections. But McMaster also has them in fractional sizes ranging 1/16" to 1/2".
            I bet you couldn't break these: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bit-set-11-...YAAOSwesVbROp2



            Yup I'm drooling over them. Gonna have to wait till I have a job again. But you should have seen the kids at work when I told them about my cordless drill -- they had never seen a bit brace before! I was telling them how we could still work when the power went out.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

            Comment


            • #21
              Of course they can be broken, although having a large tapered square shank makes certain that they will never twist or come loose in the chuck. The Drill-Hog drills I showed above have a lifetime guarantee against breakage, but by the time you package the broken bit and mail it to the manufacturer, and they send a replacement back to you (and perhaps charge shipping), you'd do better to just buy several of the most needed (and most prone to breakage) sizes. Drills 1/8" and smaller are considered expendable items, and you might as well have multiple spares. Drills 1/4" and larger rarely break unless abused or when drilling tricky items.
              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
              USA Maryland 21030

              Comment


              • #22
                N S F, I have never seen that type of drill made to fit in a hand brace before. All the ones I had in that square tapered fitting were types of wood augers. I used to have a Stanley hand brace with the ratchet option, but I lost it years ago and the ammount of use I would get from a replacement would not justify the cost of a replacement.

                Comment

                Working...
                X