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Drill Driver Bits?

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  • old mart
    replied
    N S F, I have never seen that type of drill made to fit in a hand brace before. All the ones I had in that square tapered fitting were types of wood augers. I used to have a Stanley hand brace with the ratchet option, but I lost it years ago and the ammount of use I would get from a replacement would not justify the cost of a replacement.

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    Of course they can be broken, although having a large tapered square shank makes certain that they will never twist or come loose in the chuck. The Drill-Hog drills I showed above have a lifetime guarantee against breakage, but by the time you package the broken bit and mail it to the manufacturer, and they send a replacement back to you (and perhaps charge shipping), you'd do better to just buy several of the most needed (and most prone to breakage) sizes. Drills 1/8" and smaller are considered expendable items, and you might as well have multiple spares. Drills 1/4" and larger rarely break unless abused or when drilling tricky items.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    As for those drill bits with hex shanks, I personally do not like them. They always seem to break at the juncture of the round and hex sections. But McMaster also has them in fractional sizes ranging 1/16" to 1/2".
    I bet you couldn't break these: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bit-set-11-...YAAOSwesVbROp2



    Yup I'm drooling over them. Gonna have to wait till I have a job again. But you should have seen the kids at work when I told them about my cordless drill -- they had never seen a bit brace before! I was telling them how we could still work when the power went out.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I have gone to McMaster for new and replacement driver bits. They will have almost any driver bit you may want plus accessories like extensions. Their stuff is usually good quality. That being said, things like the straight slot and Phillips screwdriver bits are usually considered expendables.

    A week or two ago I got some new Phillips bits and some hex socket bits from them. All appear to be good quality.

    As for those drill bits with hex shanks, I personally do not like them. They always seem to break at the juncture of the round and hex sections. But McMaster also has them in fractional sizes ranging 1/16" to 1/2".

    https://www.mcmaster.com/drill-bits/...nk-drill-bits/

    They are not cheap, but not over priced either.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 06-04-2020, 11:35 PM.

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    I have to make an admission. I bought a set of 1/4" hex drive drills at Harbor Freight. When I got them home and spun one, I was shocked at the runout. But it turned out the hex part just wasn't parallel with the drill. I went through and straightened the set, and since then I've used it for all kinds of jobs and have most certainly got my money's worth out of them.

    metalmagpie

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  • ikdor
    replied
    Wera is also my favourite. They also make the cutest mini wrench for the bits, the zyklop mini.

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  • enginuity
    replied
    Wera makes the best ones by a country mile.

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    I had a couple "Torx" bits that quickly stripped the spines off, and another which just snapped. I ordered five pieces of 2" long bits from Drill Hog through eBay for about $10, and they have been doing well. They have a lifetime warranty, although it may be for breakage. They also sell all kinds of drills and other tools, and they are made in Montana, USA.

    Oddly, they do not show any Torx bits or other 1/4" hex shank bits on their website, but you can get them from their eBay store.

    They do have hex shank drills:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/13-Pc-Hex-S...QAAOSwZd1VcAB7
    .
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 06-03-2020, 01:23 PM.

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  • darryl
    replied
    I can't recall the brand name, but I was in KMS a while ago and saw some bit sets that were for impact drivers. With nothing to lose except 10 bucks I took the bait. Turned out to be money well spent- I went back for two more sets.

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  • Corbettprime
    replied
    APEX brand, you can specify hardness. Way back when, I was PA in a camper plant, then later in a mobile home plant. Apex is all we bought, nothing else lasted as long.

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  • gellfex
    replied
    I've always been happy with the long hex power bits from McMaster. I posted this setup a while back using them, but I use them in the various power drivers too. They're not cheap at $4 a pop, but worth it. I truly can't recall twisting or stripping one. When you have a driver, a handle like this, some extensions and a nice little hex offset ratchet handle, you're all set for everything.

    Click image for larger version

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Those do work, although you may need to be quick with the drill trigger..... depending on how high the RPM is on yours.....

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    I can recommend these- https://www.dewalt.com/products/acce...-set/dwadt5set

    Good for fabrication type work where you don't need a gauge perfect thread, just threaded holes to mount some P-clamps or electrical hardware in cabinets.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

    They are not all the same. Some crimped ones seem to work fine and there is also ”unibody” models that are ground from single piece.
    Unibody would be fine. The crimped ones I have tried have all cammed out and spun. They would be OK for wood, except twist drills are not good for many woods. Very limited application, but so far I have not trashed them out of my "quickie grabbit" toolbox, even though it has "real" drills in it also.

    They are handy for drilling in plaster, or anything else that you really do not want to use a real drill in, and they DO fit the rapid-chuck.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    I have never run into the "dead soft" type. I HAVE run into ones that were very hard, so hard that they are brittle and crack in use.
    The usual culprits in the too soft category are Torx drivers, cheap ones just wring the tip right off on the first screw. Heck, sadly I have a set of actual Torx brand US made screwdriver type at work that did that.

    Originally posted by J Tiers
    And, I have zero idea of brands, because I do not know the various marks. Most of what I have is unmarked, or else has a mark that means nothing to me. They arrived in toolboxes from sales, or with other things.

    Really, aside from the very hard cracked ones, pretty much any of what I have used seems interchangeable and as good as the next one. They are "consumables" in general, and even the better ones do not last long in heavy use..
    That's me, my collection is currently Heinz 57. Some bits I have grabbed out of those "pick a bit" displays on various hardware store counters have been surprisingly good. Those are what I replace all the common stuff with (#2 phillips,Robertson, hex socket drivers)

    Originally posted by J Tiers
    As for drills, good luck. I have two sets, that fit two sizes of "quick socket" chuck. The quarter inch hex size is worthless for metal because the retention of the drill in the hex adapter is just via a "dimple punch" against a flat, and any serious resistance will just spin the drill, rendering it useless. The larger size works a little better, but I now will not even try in metal, Just used in wood or some plastics.

    I have never found one that was any good in metal.
    I'm usually going directly into a cordless impact driver, I've tried Makita and Bosch. They fit the driver fine, but the bits themselves are usually Chinesium. I gotta look and see if somebody like Norseman or PTD makes them, the impact driver drills holes faster than a regular cordless drill and no snags with the impact.

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