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nylon swarf control birdsnest

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  • nylon swarf control birdsnest

    I have a small run of 100 pieces. Think of turning a 3 inch nylon disk down to 2 inches. I am looking for any tips on how to control the swarf birdsnest.

    I have a shop vac set up with a nozzle strategically located to suck the long string directly into the vac. Looks like it will probably work if I can direct the stream consistently.

    Is there a better way to deal with the long stringy nylon swarf?

  • #2
    Sounds like you have the right idea. I've done it with UHMW. Any chance of trepanning rather than turning the entire waste into ribbons?
    It's all mind over matter.
    If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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    • #3
      No, probably not. I have limited grip on these parts and will have to take small bites. Lots of ribbons.

      Typical home shop environment. 11 inch Sheldon lathe.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by strokersix View Post
        I have a small run of 100 pieces. Think of turning a 3 inch nylon disk down to 2 inches. I am looking for any tips on how to control the swarf birdsnest.

        I have a shop vac set up with a nozzle strategically located to suck the long string directly into the vac. Looks like it will probably work if I can direct the stream consistently.

        Is there a better way to deal with the long stringy nylon swarf?
        I did exact same program with shop vac machining 6-1/4" dia UHMW,it worked great and filled large shop vac twice.

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        • #5
          I've milled slots and made bandsaw cuts down to just above the finished diameter before turning. Interrupted cuts don't make strings.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
            I've milled slots and made bandsaw cuts down to just above the finished diameter before turning. Interrupted cuts don't make strings.
            Hmmm. That is a thought.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
              I've milled slots and made bandsaw cuts down to just above the finished diameter before turning. Interrupted cuts don't make strings.
              Why I didn’t think of that earlier.. thanks.
              One trick I have heard with nylon is to oven bake it prior to maching. Dry nylon is typically quite brittle but once it absorbs moisture from the air it becames stringy.
              Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                Why I didn’t think of that earlier.. thanks.
                One trick I have heard with nylon is to oven bake it prior to maching. Dry nylon is typically quite brittle but once it absorbs moisture from the air it becames stringy.
                Interesting, what temperature? 100C ?
                I just need one more tool,just one!

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                • #9
                  Bad memories prompted by this subject of when I was making a lot of 4" dia UHMW balls. Man those strings are a nightmare, and dangerous if the chuck grabs a pile of them!
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gellfex View Post
                    Bad memories prompted by this subject of when I was making a lot of 4" dia UHMW balls. Man those strings are a nightmare, and dangerous if the chuck grabs a pile of them!
                    And amazingly strong too.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

                      And amazingly strong too.
                      Damn straight! The worst is if they loop around something your cross slide and catch on the chuck, then they'll yank the tool into the work by taking up the backlash. It's really hard to vac them at the same time as using a big radius cutter.
                      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                      • #12
                        Looked behind my lathe the other day- there sits a big birds nest of pvc and who knows what else. Time to snag that outta there before it gets snagged up in the chuck. I've had that happen before.

                        If you can turn away from the chuck, it can help to minimize the problems.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

                          Interesting, what temperature? 100C ?
                          I can't remember details. I heard about it from some old beards locally but apparently its also known more widely:

                          https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...85/#post518894
                          https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...94/#post723494

                          annealing is also apparently done sometimes after machining to reduce stresses in plastics!
                          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by strokersix View Post
                            I have a small run of 100 pieces. Think of turning a 3 inch nylon disk down to 2 inches. I am looking for any tips on how to control the swarf birdsnest.

                            I have a shop vac set up with a nozzle strategically located to suck the long string directly into the vac. Looks like it will probably work if I can direct the stream consistently.

                            Is there a better way to deal with the long stringy nylon swarf?
                            I found this to be the best solution to the bird nesting / streaming of plastics.

                            The only issue is mounting the vac nozzle if you want to make it a semi permanent set up. Most of the time I just hold the nozzle by hand as I'm turning.

                            I was going to mount the nozzle on a stand behind the lathe and position it close to the cutting tool.

                            JL..............

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                            • #15
                              On my previous job we had seal lathes and they had vacuum nozzles with a chopper inside.

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