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Power Venilator Fan Motor

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  • Power Venilator Fan Motor

    I have recently had a couple of power ventilator motors stop working and want to share the cause and solution I came up with!
    One blew the thermal fuse so I replaced it but when installed it did not work properly so I installed the other one I had worked on. They both ran on the bench in the horizontal position, when installed they are in the vertical position, that was my first mistake, I should have tested them in the vertical position!
    I noticed more endshake than I thought was normal but they ran fine on the bench so I dismissed it,
    After disassembly I noticed wear marks in the rotor and the bearing housing and realized that the problem was worn/missing spacer!
    Into the workshop and a scrap piece of bronze was turned into three 3/4"OD x 1/2" ID x 1/8'' thick washers to take up some of the endshake a put space between the rotor and bearing housing.
    Problem solved!
    I made the third washer for the motor that is installed in the second power vent, I am sure it will need one in the future because the originals must be made out of paper or plastic!
    I hope this helps another member fix a motor instead of paying the $40-$125 prices I found on the internet,


  • #2
    Even my small 110v bathroom fan motor had the same problem. Mounted in the vertical, after 15 years, it had the same worn out spacer and wear on down side of the rotor. I replaced the worn spacer with a small fiber material spacer, I found in my stash of washers. A little light oiling of the bearings, and it seems to work just fine again.
    S E Michigan

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    • #3
      Same thing may happen with a motor set horizontally. When power is applied, the rotor tends to be pulled into alignment with the stator core. If the rotor was slightly misaligned to begin with, it may be pulled against the washer, and when the washer wears, it may allow the rotor to be pulled to a position where it jams.
      CNC machines only go through the motions

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