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I stand corrected -- revising my grind

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  • #31
    My only concern with diamond/tangential tools is the direction of the major force. With the standard tools the force is mostly perpendicular to the length of the tool. With the 3-set screw square or QCTP holders you don't have to clamp too hard. With the diamond/tangential tools the major force is parallel to the tool's length. This means you have to really clamp down hard on the bit in the holder to keep it from slipping. All that said, I love my Diamond bits and holder. Mostly I do Aluminum and plastics.

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    • #32
      Well, if it'll handle a 3/8 end mill into steel and if you could figure out how to hold the block on the two angles at one time you could whittle out something along this line. It's just a straight slot after all.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #33
        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

        Now *that's* an interesting idea, and I did consider something like that. But I would want to have a mill to make that.
        That can be easily made on a lathe using a 4 jaw to hold the block as you face each side. Once it's a block you attach it to the compound with that screw down the middle, shimming as needed to get a slant and correct height on it. Then an endmill in the chuck will cut a groove right where you want it.

        If you were using zero rake tooling on the 7x10, that would explain part of why you were not happy with it. It likes rake to cut the chips properly.

        Dan
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

        Location: SF East Bay.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by danlb View Post

          That can be easily made on a lathe using a 4 jaw to hold the block as you face each side. Once it's a block you attach it to the compound with that screw down the middle, shimming as needed to get a slant and correct height on it. Then an endmill in the chuck will cut a groove right where you want it.
          Dan
          Now, *there's* something I didn't think of... thanks!
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • #35
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            Well, if it'll handle a 3/8 end mill into steel and if you could figure out how to hold the block on the two angles at one time you could whittle out something along this line. It's just a straight slot after all.
            I have successfully used up to 1/2" endmills in a collet before, but my main problem is workholding and tie down. Also learning how deep to go with the endmill on the lathe -- I stalled it out dead once by going too deep on some A36, then the work came loose and fed itself into the mill.... ruined job.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #36
              I'm guessing that it'll be a happy day around the NCF shop when you get yourself some sort of mill.

              Not sure how well it would work but if you could make up a double angled wedge that fits into the slot of a quick change holder? Or just put the idea away for when a mill arrives....
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #37
                Originally posted by danlb View Post

                That can be easily made on a lathe using a 4 jaw to hold the block as you face each side. Once it's a block you attach it to the compound with that screw down the middle, shimming as needed to get a slant and correct height on it. Then an endmill in the chuck will cut a groove right where you want it.

                If you were using zero rake tooling on the 7x10, that would explain part of why you were not happy with it. It likes rake to cut the chips properly.

                Dan
                I'm trying to get that in my mind, I can't see it.
                You got a pic of that setup with the screw holding it on the compound??

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                • #38
                  With some work a wedge of hard maple or oak could be made up to get the compound angles and cut the slot at the proper height. But the hole through the middle would be at a rather strong angle requiring that a special "T" nut be made up with an angled threaded hole. So perhaps easier to make up the shim block and then clamp it in place in some manner.

                  If I were milling on my lathe a key tool for me would be a sturdy angle plate. It would be set up to attach rigidly to the cross slide even if that meant tapered pins into the slide. And the face towards the headstock would be liberally drilled and threaded for clamps. With that sort of setup the block could be perched on a simple wedge and held angled for the other direction and clamped in place and then the slot could be cut.
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #39
                    I honestly can't remember the last time I picked up a lantern post.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                      I'm guessing that it'll be a happy day around the NCF shop when you get yourself some sort of mill.

                      Not sure how well it would work but if you could make up a double angled wedge that fits into the slot of a quick change holder? Or just put the idea away for when a mill arrives....
                      Yep, pretty much. Although by this point I'm pretty set on a conventional AXA tool post. I'm very happy with the way the 4-way is doing, and my lantern setup also works if nothing else does. But certainly neither one of those would have been my first choice. Its all just make do and mend.
                      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                        I honestly can't remember the last time I picked up a lantern post.
                        Yup, I've been trying to avoid them. But the lathe came with it and I didn't have anything else, so I started with that. I was actually trained on new Industrial sized Asian machines with QCTP, so I'm saving up for a smaller QCTP to fit.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by KMoffett View Post
                          My only concern with diamond/tangential tools is the direction of the major force. With the standard tools the force is mostly perpendicular to the length of the tool. With the 3-set screw square or QCTP holders you don't have to clamp too hard. With the diamond/tangential tools the major force is parallel to the tool's length. This means you have to really clamp down hard on the bit in the holder to keep it from slipping. All that said, I love my Diamond bits and holder. Mostly I do Aluminum and plastics.
                          this is why real tools of this type have serrated clamping surfaces:

                          https://www.ifanger.com/system-ifanger.html

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                          • #43
                            I learned how to sharpen HHS bits for all kinds of different materials from the book that came with the Atlas lathe my dad brought home when I was about 10. A swiss machinist from his work came over and mounted the new 3 jaw chuck. That book was excellent in explaining all the different tool shapes and had tables for rake angles and such for lots of different materials. Try turning copper, or better yet try drilling a hole in it. The right shape makes all the difference.

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                            • #44
                              Don’t say that! I am 73 and have two lathes I look at every day. Just like my 29 Ford, I pat them and say soon.

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