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Tell me about the Burke Millrite mill

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  • #31
    Yes you can invert the head. Be careful, once you loosen the last bolt it’s just you and gravity!
    i moved mine in a very light trailer. We removed the head then the ram, then the turret, hoisted the base with knee and table with a hoist.

    Ringo, where are you located?

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    • #32
      savannah, ga

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      • #33
        Have you joined:
        [email protected]
        formerly the Yahoo Burke milling machine group.

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        • #34
          I see that on this mill, I cannot move the ram. It is stuck. I see no obvious wear on the ram v-ways, the scraping is prominent. The scraping on the x-table and knee looks pretty good. the leadscrews look pretty good.
          there is wear on the y-axis (where all the swarf falls)
          but my bugaboo is that I cannot move the ram.
          I'm thinking of a means to push/pull it, but I afraid to mess it up worse.
          Any ideas?

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          • #35
            Mine was hard to move too. I'm a little guy, 135lbs soaking wet. I finally fabricated a jackscrew from ACME rod and nut. Now its a simple thing to move it and I do that quite often for different setups.

            Here's a link to the thread I posted about that mod. https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...l-millrite-mod

            Unfortunately, the photos were on photobucket and I wouldn't pay. I've heard some say there is a way around that but I don't know what it is. In any case, you can see that others have had that problem too. I can take new photos if you're interested.
            Last edited by chipmaker4130; 06-25-2020, 06:09 PM.
            Southwest Utah

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            • #36
              Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
              Mine was hard to move too. I'm a little guy, 135lbs soaking wet. I finally fabricated a jackscrew from ACME rod and nut. Now its a simple thing to move it and I do that quite often for different setups.
              How did you make up the ends to push/pull?

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              • #37
                Click image for larger version  Name:	Composit.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.02 MB ID:	1883255

                Naturally, none of the surfaces are flat or parallel, so some minor scraping was required.
                Last edited by chipmaker4130; 06-25-2020, 08:15 PM.
                Southwest Utah

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                • #38
                  Ah, OK,
                  you did some drilling & tapping. !!
                  Nice job, well done
                  Since mine was jammed up, I pulled the motor to be tested, and pulled the spindle head.
                  I got a heavy alum bar across 2 of the Tbolts that hold the head on, got a threaded rod in the bar and pushed against the turret.
                  It started moving, and I kept working fresh oil into the ram dovetail and wiping and freshing the oil.
                  in no time the ram was sliding nicely. The turret felt awful, so i pulled the ram out, removed the turret, and cleaned all that up.
                  I found that the access hole for the turret' Tbolts filled up with swarf. it was quite nasty. the turret felt crunchy as it turned around.

                  I got all that cleaned up, fresh oil, and now the turret & ram move like soft butter.
                  I had raised the knee, along with some wood blocking, to hold the correct height to pull the ram, cleaned all that up and upon putting it all back I had a WHOAAA moment.
                  I had to jiggle the ram to get back into the turret, and when it finally did,,,,WHOAAA,, I almost pushed the ram out the back end.....all the way through.....
                  Again, nice job you did there.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                    I see that on this mill, I cannot move the ram. It is stuck. I see no obvious wear on the ram v-ways, the scraping is prominent. The scraping on the x-table and knee looks pretty good. the leadscrews look pretty good.
                    there is wear on the y-axis (where all the swarf falls)
                    but my bugaboo is that I cannot move the ram.
                    I'm thinking of a means to push/pull it, but I afraid to mess it up worse.
                    Any ideas?
                    I had to give mine a does of penetrating oil and bash it forward with a big chunk of firewood. Got it out and cleaned up all the sliding surfaces, now I can push it in or out pretty easily.

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                    • #40
                      My ram was stuck as well, probably because they tend to not be moved very often, maybe years in a shop environment. I soaked mine with ATF/acetone for a week or two then was able to gradually move it with a heavy mallet hitting on a piece of plywood. Once it starts moving you can work some lube into the ways and before you know it the ram will glide like it is on ball bearings.

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                      • #41
                        AHH !!
                        I see everybody seems to have had the same sticky ram.
                        Mine came out of a dirty nasty production shop, so far it looks like a thorough cleaning will put this machine back in order.

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                        • #42
                          I got the ram & turret cleaned up with fresh lube.
                          since I already have the motor & head off, I'm tempted to go into the spindle/quill and freshen up the lube in there.
                          Has any one else done this?
                          any ideas to add?

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                          • #43
                            No need to 'go into' the spindle to lube it. There is a plug on the right side of the quill you'll see when extended. remove the plug and put the required amount of grease in and you're done. It seems funky to let the grease fall onto the bearing but that's the factory procedure and there are a lot of those mills humming along for decades. Don't overdue it. If you do, you'll be puking grease out the spindle nose anytime you use high rpm for a while. The top bearing is sealed, but of course can be greased by removing the seal if needed.

                            To answer your question, yes, I've done it but it was not necessary and I'll not do it again unless I think there is a problem. It would be well to check the preload though.
                            Last edited by chipmaker4130; 06-26-2020, 06:27 PM.
                            Southwest Utah

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                            • #44
                              The manual says to add grease to the spindle every 45 days, or 200 hours of operation. "Any good grade of bearing grease", and then it says the best type is a "short fiber medium sponge" grease with a "sodium soap base". Then it says that "this is not critical" and goes on to caution against excessive or too-frequent greasing.
                              Southwest Utah

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                              • #45
                                Well, I bought this machine with no known history whatsoever, it come from a machinery auction,,,,,out of a production shop,,,so I feel the need to at least take a close look.
                                If I had a good feeling about it's past history, I could just let it ride,,,,but.
                                I'm just afraid to open up the quill, and then setup preload, then it might never be as good...........

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