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  • Lead.

    And I don't mean follow, or get out of the way. Lead- there's several hundred lbs of lead available to me if I want it. What could I do with it? It's in 20, 30, and 40 lb bricks. Use it as weight for an energy storage device? Make special boots? Does it have any use in mold making? A counterweight for a one man elevator? It won't be free, but I'm sure it will be a good price.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Build a yacht and chuck it in the keel for ballast.

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    • #3
      I used a few hundred pounds of lead to fill a weight box for my small tractor. Lots of weight in a small package so it left some room in the box for a chain and a few tools..

      Beyond just needing something heavy and dense, lead seems not much of a general purpose material.

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      • #4
        cast your own bullets. or fishing weights, make your own lures

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        • #5
          Bullet casting is what I do with lead. I've thought of filling a copper pipe with lead and then hammer both sides shut to seal in the lead. That would make for a nice drift.

          A few pellets of lead is also good for a dead blow hammer, though you can easily get that out of some shotgun shells.

          Only way I could see getting rid of hundreds of pounds though is by shooting them into the berm.

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          • #6
            A couple lead hammers in different sizes are always useful in a shop. A taping block--basically a chunk of round stock--is
            handy for finer work
            Keith
            __________________________
            Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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            • #7
              I think there's an on-going demand among fisherman for split-shot sinkers. Should have enough lead there for a few million. You'll probably want to devise an automated way of slitting or gashing them to clamp on the line. Doing it by hand would get tedious.
              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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              • #8
                I discovered that weight at the bottom of machine stands and benches is good. I my case, I store short ends under my belt sander and bandsaw stands, which are on casters. Lead if cheap enough would be great. Also if you have any plans for a gravity feed for a vertical band saw, you'll want some for that.
                I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                Oregon, USA

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by darryl View Post
                  And I don't mean follow, or get out of the way. Lead- there's several hundred lbs of lead available to me if I want it. What could I do with it? It's in 20, 30, and 40 lb bricks. Use it as weight for an energy storage device? Make special boots? Does it have any use in mold making? A counterweight for a one man elevator? It won't be free, but I'm sure it will be a good price.
                  I use lead for hammers. In my line of work I often need to get bearings off shafts without dinging up the shaft, and a lead brick is perfect for that. Its also handy for a fixturing metal such as woods metal or roses metal, when you have a tricky setup. I have about 10 lbs of it sitting around here. At work, we used to use lead wire to make high temperature flange gaskets -- it coducts the heat away fast enough to not melt. When you draw up the bolts it would squeeze out paper-thin and be absolutely airtight.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #10
                    Think of an application where changing the resonant frequency of something would improve it. Perhaps a lathe or mill could do with a bit more mass in the right place.

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                    • #11

                      The purer it is, the better - particularly when it comes to selling it. Unless you’re pouring a keel or something like that, you’ll never use it up yourself. Lead hammers are great - I’ve got probably twenty pounds of them. But you only need the lead one time, as you re-cast them when they get too banged up.

                      Shooters use a lot of lead. Some want pure lead, some will mix in some tin, some use wheel weights or a mix. Lead wheel weights are getting harder to find. So pure lead is a real plus. Heavy bullets for my 45-70, I get only about 15 per pound.

                      It really depends on the price. If the price is low enough, buy it and sell off what you can’t use.

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                      • #12
                        Alloy it and make organ pipes
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          use it to make a drill press table counterweight

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                          • #14
                            The value of it to a shooter that casts their own bullets or round ball will certainly depend on the actual alloy. If that is unknown there are ways to check the Brinell hardness.

                            And certainly a single brick could come in handy for casting into a couple of nice soft lead hammers and perhaps for a soft pad for supporting work that needs to be protected and a few other things that might come up if you know you have it.

                            But for a day in and day out shop use? I suspect it would sit around for a long time before you find a need for that much of it. The only good thing is that a couple of hundred lbs of it doesn't take up a whole lot of room. Frankly I'd not bother with it myself. Not unless you wanted to turn it into money for yourself by using it to make the line sinkers or similar that were suggested above.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • #15
                              You can use it to practice breaking off drill bits... :-)
                              Who do I think you are...?

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