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  • colchester plaques

    How were the plaques made on the colchester lathes like the old round head student. They were brass with a fairly deep emboss.
    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...project/page12

  • #2
    Most likely cast in Brass ,based on the appearance of the back(rear) surface

    Rich
    Green Bay, WI

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    • #3
      Is it possible these were etched .How is the etching process done..?
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        That is a great thread. I guy has offered me one of those lathe, but I cannot buy it right now,

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        • #5
          Yes it is a great thread . It looks like colchesters are real nice lathes. That plaque is beautiful. Lathes of that age dont have plaques that last.I would have broken something on that lathe by now. There are so many hidden grubscrews all over .Is colchester still around.?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by plunger View Post
            Yes it is a great thread . It looks like colchesters are real nice lathes. That plaque is beautiful. Lathes of that age dont have plaques that last.I would have broken something on that lathe by now. There are so many hidden grubscrews all over .Is colchester still around.?
            Yes still going.
            Most of the manual lathes are Taiwan made.
            QC is still very good.
            Clausing bought Colchester or vise versa in the 60's or the holding company who owned the brands. Hence a lot of cross over in design on some models.

            "The World Turns on Colchester Lathes" was a nice brass plaque at the end of the bed below the tailstock on ever Colchester lathe.

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            • #7
              The Colchester company was originally based in the delightful city of that name, but by the time I moved to live near there in the late 1970s it had been bought out and the factory had been closed down. The current owners of the name are the massive multinational 600 Group. A Colchester Student lathe is still available new.
              In their Colchester city days there was a factory over the road that had a fair claim to producing the world's finest precision bearings, which the lathe company used exclusively—and Paxman made their large diesels just up the road. All gone now.

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              • #8
                Later globe logos were red plastic . Do they use Gamet bearings ?
                The coolest thing you can get for at least some of their lathes is a high speed threading attachment, it pulls the tool out automatically at a location you set. I think it's called an Ainjest Threading Attachment.

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                • #9
                  The more modern student models seem fragile based on the number of folks I see looking to replace broken phenolic gears in the headstock. Especially considering the amount of hp. There are various parts sources, some much more expensive than others.

                  Excellent factory tour from back in the day. Cheerio!

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQaAKUAzK0w

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mike Burch View Post
                    The Colchester company was originally based in the delightful city of that name, but by the time I moved to live near there in the late 1970s it had been bought out and the factory had been closed down. The current owners of the name are the massive multinational 600 Group. A Colchester Student lathe is still available new.
                    In their Colchester city days there was a factory over the road that had a fair claim to producing the world's finest precision bearings, which the lathe company used exclusively—and Paxman made their large diesels just up the road. All gone now.
                    I would never have used the word "delightful" to describe Colchester town....
                    Nor would the many squaddies who had to do their pennance there for being very naughty boys in her Majesty's Army....

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post

                      I would never have used the word "delightful" to describe Colchester town....
                      Nor would the many squaddies who had to do their pennance there for being very naughty boys in her Majesty's Army....
                      Sounds like there's a story there. Tell us more about your "naughtiness".

                      -js
                      There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                      Location: SF Bay Area

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                      • #12
                        The brass plaques are really nice. How do you think they were done.If you look at the pic it is quite deep. What etching process is used here.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post

                          Sounds like there's a story there. Tell us more about your "naughtiness".

                          -js
                          Lol.
                          I've got lots of mid 80's Colchester stories, but they are certainly not fit for public consumption.
                          I was also never a member of Her Majesty's Armed Forces, fortunately.
                          We would never have got on.......

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                          • #14
                            I moved to Brightlingsea, nine miles away from Colchester, in 1979, and sailed away in 1986. So Colchester was the nearest city, and as I had nothing to do with UK military, I found it (with its long history) quite charming. My wife taught there, and we were both involved in the choral music scene.

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