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  • Helpful links an pics moving a mill

    I bought a Burke Millrite and a DoAll surface grinder, I'm reaching out for helpful links or pics on moving these.
    I DO NOT have access to overhead anything. It all has to be done from the bottom.
    It will be loaded by a rigger at the point of purchase, but when I get home I have to unload myself.
    Unload from a pickup truck height, or a rented trailer height.
    Here is a kicker,,, from the truck to the garage goes uphill.
    The garage is higher than street level.
    So, I envision a ramp of some kind.
    I made myself some skates and a johnson bar.
    I see videos on youtoob on moving stuff, but not, from a pickup,,,down a ramp,,,to the ground,,,to go uphill.
    Any ideas??

  • #2
    Are they able to be lifted/moved using a rented fork-lift, or too large?
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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    • #3
      Maybe hire a tow truck with a boom, should be able to pick and place it for you fairly cheaply, or skid steer etc.... I've loaded and unloaded a few awkward things with mine. (Skid steer that is)...
      If it wasn't done the hard way, I didn't do it.

      Lillooet
      British Columbia
      Canada.

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      • #4
        For lifting and moving my mill from the back of the truck I used my engine hoist.

        Most mills are just too top heavy to risk more than a very slight lean angle. And looking at the pictures of this "baby Bridgeport" style machine it is no different. If it starts to go at all it'll be gone. Depending on the slope of the drive it's simply not worth the risk

        Same with the grinder. They are pretty top heavy with not all that large a base as well. If there's much of a slope to your drive it'll be nasty. Not to mention how are you going to pull it up the slope? These are heavy enough that you're not going to just get behind and give'er a grunt. So to me the obvious option is to get it as close as you can then use an engine hoist to lift it up, drive out from under then lower and move only the last couple of feet into the garage and from there to the chosen setup spot.

        My roll up door isn't all that high so I could only get close to the door but not actually inside. I set up the engine hoist so that it was half in and have just out the door where I just barely got enough lift to raise the machine clear of the deck of the box then I could drive out from under.

        It was a really close thing for me lifting the whole unit out of my truck which is a Ranger Sport 4x4. So not the lowest bed height out there. And only with care with keeping the lift chains really short was I able to get the mill up off the deck. But as you can see in the pictures below it's a "short" machine that sits on a box. Your Millrite is a full height so if you have the choice I'd suggest a low deck trailer for bringing the machines home. Then with the trailer in place block/jack the rear of the trailer and shift each machine in turn to the rear edge where you lift them up and carefully roll back and lower the weight onto your rollers or onto cross planks over the feet of the engine hoist. Then you can push it around a little more aggressively.

        I'm sorry there's no pictures of it on the hoist. We were too busy watching all the important stuff. But it was a basic 2T engine hoist. With the arm boomed up as high as it would go and with the lift chains as short as possible it was "just" enough lift and height at the 1.5T lift position of the arm to raise the mill off the bed to let me move the truck away. But at that position it was too high to roll through the door directly. But that would have been foolish with it all that high anyway. But with the truck out of the way I lowered it onto a couple of pieces of 2x6 laid across the feet of the hoist so that the boom had sort of roughly 1/3 the weight for stability and the rest was on the wood. That's the roll around position for anything heavy. Movements when supported by the boom are done gently and with care.

        All in all with your Millrite being a one piece base if you have a choice I'd go low trailer. It would make lifting it off with an engine hoist a LOT easier. I don't think you'd get the height you need if it were in one piece. You'd at least have to take off the head to allow you to lift from roughly bed height in a stable manner. At least from a truck bed. If working with a low deck trailer lifting the whole thing directly with an engine hoist should be fine.

        Using a low deck might also allow you to back the rear of the trailer a short way into the garage where all the lifting can be done directly over the more level garage floor.

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        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          Hi Ringo, I have moved a lot of equipment and machinery of various sizes and weights over the years but I don't consider myself an expert rigger so take my advice with caution. If you can bolt some 4x4's to the bottom of the Millrite and move it with pipe rollers that will give you the lowest center of gravity, although it will still be top heavy. Having someone to help you would be advised really. A good pallet underneath and using a pallet jack is also an option, How steep is the incline to your shop? If you are not adverse to anchoring a pull point into the concrete floor and using a good chain type come-along and straps, you could pull it up the incline, slow but sure. Renting a forklift obviously would be an option depending on where you live would not be cheap but the safest. I would strongly suggest renting a dropdeck trailer rather than putting it into the back of a pickup, you will save yourself a lot of frustration , although you might be able to rig it with the appropriate size and capacity engine hoist or A frame. 140 above had some good suggestions also. If you use skates remember to put some wood between the skate and the machine, (or a piece of old firehose) metal to metal is not your friend and skates sit higher and don't like rough surfaces and cracks.All in all look for a way that is the safest and least pain in the nether regions to you and if you can enlist some competent help do so. Hope this helps. Jim (I type slower than BC, he has some good advice also)

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          • #6
            Mount to enough large and sturdy baseplate with lag bolts and chains and it wont topple over.
            Strategically mounted pulley and wire rope would allow you to pull the mill on wooden skids/skis around with the help of the pick-up.
            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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            • #7
              I have to admit in your situation I'd hire a tow truck with a decent boom. If you're on good terms with any auto shops, maybe offer some machining in trade. When I moved my lathe into the house, I took it apart and did it in pieces, just muscle power, some scrap timber and a pinch bar.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #8
                a forklift could do it, but then how do I move the forklift from the rental place to the garage?
                mill approx 1500lbs and grinder 1000

                I have already buy some 4x4's to build a 8' long pallet, and some 2x6 to cross the pallet. lag bolt it down to the pallet???
                ​​​​​​​I may sink a hard point in the concrete floor at the far end of the garage.

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                • #9
                  I rented a 3 wheel electric forklift from United Rentals, they will deliver and pickup.
                  The forklift had a boom and forks.
                  I moved a Bridgeport mill that I had in my basement for over 20 years.
                  I had a block garage built in my yard.
                  Larry
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                  • #10
                    you rented the forklift and they delivered it ?????

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                    • #11
                      you rented the forklift and they delivered it ?????
                      The place that wouldn't rent me their drop bed trailer because it was "for their own use" presumably used it to deliver things like that...
                      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                      • #12
                        I'm curious about why you want to drop the machines at the curb rather than right at your garage door? All your posts so far seem to be focused on that one option.

                        Of course if you get a forklift or something of that sort which has its own power I guess it doesn't really matter. But since all your posts seem to be centered around using your "Armstrong" power it would seem like it would be far better to have them dropped off right by the door.

                        If you got a low deck trailer and if the mill is lagged to some 4x4 sleepers or a good pallet with "runners" for the return to home I'm wondering about the idea of poking the back lip of the trailer in the garage door then jacking up the front off the trailer until the back lip is touching the floor. Then pull off the pallets with machines on board and VOILA! They are sitting on the rather level garage floor. Mind you without any sort of lift.... and here I come back to the engine hoist again as a lower cost option to either buy or rent.... how will you get it off the pallets safely? You're only going to want to tip it a very little at a time what with it being so top heavy. If you slide it from the pallet onto some stacks of thin material and then remove the layers I can see them needing to be just 1/2" thick or so to avoid tipping too far.
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                          you rented the forklift and they delivered it ?????
                          I live in a smallish town and all the rental places will deliver heavy equipment for a fee. Its been a while but I think it was $50 for delivery and pickup combined on a mini-ex.
                          Southwest Utah

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                            I'm curious about why you want to drop the machines at the curb rather than right at your garage door? All your posts so far seem to be focused on that one option.

                            Of course if you get a forklift or something of that sort which has its own power I guess it doesn't really matter. But since all your posts seem to be centered around using your "Armstrong" power it would seem like it would be far better to have them dropped off right by the door.

                            If you got a low deck trailer and if the mill is lagged to some 4x4 sleepers or a good pallet with "runners" for the return to home I'm wondering about the idea of poking the back lip of the trailer in the garage door then jacking up the front off the trailer until the back lip is touching the floor. Then pull off the pallets with machines on board and VOILA! They are sitting on the rather level garage floor. Mind you without any sort of lift.... and here I come back to the engine hoist again as a lower cost option to either buy or rent.... how will you get it off the pallets safely? You're only going to want to tip it a very little at a time what with it being so top heavy. If you slide it from the pallet onto some stacks of thin material and then remove the layers I can see them needing to be just 1/2" thick or so to avoid tipping too far.
                            what you are describing is close to what I have in mind.
                            I have the standard residential garage door, no extra head room, and, the driveway slopes immediately to the street from the door.
                            So, there is no head room to back into the garage, and, if you drop the machine in front of the door it is sitting on the incline.
                            I guess my idea of a pallet is rather a skid.
                            yes, so far I'm thinking of mounting the machine to the pallet (skid) and drag the skid (and machine as one) down the ramp, or, up the driveway.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                              you rented the forklift and they delivered it ?????
                              Last I checked most places will do that. Might want to look into it.
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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