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  • Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

    I suspect this was done long after 41 or the factory. I swear virtually every single part on this ol gal has been f**ked up.
    That is exactly what I'm suspecting too. Is there any way for the mechanism to work properly with a central hole? Of course, any machine that old is bound to have some surprises in it, so I wouldn't be too disappointed. Especially if it was in an industrial maint shop.

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    • Its not until you actually look inside a machine that you find out that the reallity is much different from the reputation that you imagined that that make had. When I was rebuilding the Tom senior light vertical, I found lots of fundamental flaws in the design and build quality. One of the castings had a mass of partly melted bits of steel in it that would be more expected of the worst Chinese practice.

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      • Originally posted by old mart View Post
        Its not until you actually look inside a machine that you find out that the reality is much different from the reputation that you imagined that that make had. When I was rebuilding the Tom senior light vertical, I found lots of fundamental flaws in the design and build quality. One of the castings had a mass of partly melted bits of steel in it that would be more expected of the worst Chinese practice.
        Maybe. I didn't see any quality issues in my rebuild. Everything was top notch. Design choices which 77 years later I can say "yeah not the best"? Sure. But I have the benefit of hind sight.

        This does seem like a factory issue unless as said the part is a replacement. The offset bushing is a little hackish, but much less hackish than a shimmed and slotted cover.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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        • NCF, OM and TMB: Yea I am torn on the offset bushing or Doozers suggestion of slotting the holes. Per TMB I made an aluminum bushing and installed. The mount holes are about 1/16 off center, the screw will actually thread in but the head won't recess. I don't think it needs a shim but will wait until I get that shaft turning to see where it centers up, I think its high from the pressure below it. So I am leaning to slotting the holes and using a slightly bigger screw head and milling the cover to fit so it looks stock from the outside. This also means anyone in the future, if there is one, can just replace the bushing with a stock one.So per NCF a central hole and all is good from there on out. This 'seems' like the 'correct' way to go. Any comments welcome.

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          • Question: I need to buy a few taper pin reamers to use by hand a few times at most. I see straight flute and helical. I assume straight is best for hand and helical for power. Is this correct or what would yall advise? Sizes are 2 to 6 on the pins. Cheers and keep your powder dry!

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            • In my experience they both work fine. I'd probably stick to the straight for new holes and spiral for old.
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

              Comment


              • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                In my experience they both work fine. I'd probably stick to the straight for new holes and spiral for old.
                You know MB you could apply that for a different situation, Doozer might know

                Well I got both, new and old, but more old than new, so probably helical would be fine. Thanks

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                • I wish I had reamers, period. If I can ever afford to get some, I am leaning towards spiral flutes across the board.

                  It occurs to me that you could make some nice vintage looking screws for that cover with a wider-than-normal head.

                  I've always been a sucker for the antique gloss black finishes with the high-crowned nickel acorn nuts $$$$
                  Kind of like hot women and expensive liquor and fast cars. I'm still single, sober, and drive an old S-10.

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                  • Another recommendation. If you only need a few pins, McMaster sells extra long ones. They seem to be typically installed towards the top end of the pin. So if you think you're gonna ream out a hole, any at all, then get the next size up in in an overlapping length, then cut off both ends.

                    For example: If you need 1 1/2" #4, then buy a 3 1/2" #5 and you'll be able to ream it as much as your heat desires. This wasn't something I was able to communicate effectively to dad so it made for some custom work on my part.

                    I'm sure you knew that, but maybe someone reading didn't.
                    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                      I wish I had reamers, period. If I can ever afford to get some, I am leaning towards spiral flutes across the board.

                      It occurs to me that you could make some nice vintage looking screws for that cover with a wider-than-normal head.

                      I've always been a sucker for the antique gloss black finishes with the high-crowned nickel acorn nuts $$$$
                      Kind of like hot women and expensive liquor and fast cars. I'm still single, sober, and drive an old S-10.
                      Well here's how it turned out. I installed the standard bushing on center and slotted over the inner holes, then oversized the head hole over the same distance. New oversized head fillister screws and its happy. Better than the offset screwball bushing program. I think somewhere along the line this ol gal took a hard crash via the leadscrew as there is plenty of damage to the gearbox I had to repair. Will post some pics of all the damage.

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                      • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                        Another recommendation. If you only need a few pins, McMaster sells extra long ones. They seem to be typically installed towards the top end of the pin. So if you think you're gonna ream out a hole, any at all, then get the next size up in in an overlapping length, then cut off both ends.

                        For example: If you need 1 1/2" #4, then buy a 3 1/2" #5 and you'll be able to ream it as much as your heat desires. This wasn't something I was able to communicate effectively to dad so it made for some custom work on my part.

                        I'm sure you knew that, but maybe someone reading didn't.
                        Yep that's exactly what I did. 3, 5 & 6 pins and now a reamer or two to clean up these boogered holes.

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                        • Repairs: Who knew

                          Shift handle everything worn out.

                          Feed rod over bushing to repair worn out rod.

                          All new bronze bushings in the housings.

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                          • Repairs: I must stop taking things apart!

                            Feed rod housing took a major hit sometime in the past. I am guessing the carriage was in feed and ran into the business end of the lathe pulling this housing out of the gearbox. Brazed it up and added two extra screws in the broken off ear and extras around to even things out. The original holes were a mess. They had welded it in the past which didn't help any.

                            Housing support for all the rods at the tailstock end had the locating ears broken off so replaced with solid bar. This was a pain the ass to set up on the mill and get everything right with that odd shaped casting.

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                            • Some very nice looking work Vector. Shame they trashed that thing so bad. My clutch lever is worn out as well, but being not square, and having an internal key in the bushing, there is nothing I can really do about it. It's very usable though.
                              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post
                                How to handle this? Cast iron handle to HR steel. Per Nickel City I am going to paste silver solder the handle to the new sleeve but the handle has a previously welded crack that is cracked again. What would you do with the crack? Tack weld it to keep it stable when silver soldering? Grind a groove in it? Leave it as is? Don't want to make anything worse as the previous repair left
                                that area pretty thin.


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                                I dont knowif you dealt with this yet or what success You have had, but for silver soldering that crack, i would acid wash it as any oil, grease or carbon in that crack will keep the solder from flowing in and filling. Another thing is you said that rim was getting(is) awfully thin. If the outside diameter isn’t critical you might try making a bronze ring with a split for the handle to slip over the entire ring then sweat solder the whole rim. That bronze ring would have to be loose enough for the solder to flow between the rim and the bronze ring. To ensure good solder flow all the way around, once the ring is in position and fluxed up, take a center punch and strike a divit in the bronze edge this would cause a bulge in the edge. Placing four on the top edge and for on the obverse edge would act like little stand-offs to insure that the solder would flow and fill evenly.

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