Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Doing the nasty with my Blazing Saddle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Doing the nasty with my Blazing Saddle

    I oil my machine religiously. But some areas were inconvenient.
    So I added some oiling ports, drilled and tapped 10-32.
    Just undo the brass screws and give a squirt of oil.
    In the future I may add Gits oilers but brass screws will do for now.
    Now I can guarantee the Vactra is reaching under the felts and onto the vee ways.
    After doing that nasty job on that boring bar last night...
    BTW the lathe was within .001 over 18" so I can't complain.
    You want pics?

    'Scuse me while I whip this out....
    Drilling (!) the saddle:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Drilling-saddle.jpg
Views:	290
Size:	299.3 KB
ID:	1881046

    Tapping (!) the saddle:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Tapping-saddle.jpg
Views:	282
Size:	154.6 KB
ID:	1881047

    Oiled and Finished saddle:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Oiled-and-Finished-saddle.jpg
Views:	310
Size:	334.6 KB
ID:	1881048

    The lathe says, "Smooth move, slick chick!"

    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

  • #2
    Nice!
    S E Michigan

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by OaklandGB View Post
      Nice!
      Thanks! I was doing some really hardturning roughing on an old axle shaft last night.... and the felts were leaving really dark black streaks on the ways. So I figured it would be a good idea to upgrade the oiling. Made an old Jeep axle into a 3/4 X 9" boring bar.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

      Comment


      • #4
        yah, I read someone here mention old axles as good round bar material.
        Was at the car boneyard the other day and stepping over old axles everywhere.
        I asked and they wanted $40 apiece for them, and they couldnt be identified as to truck fitment.
        ......well, so much for that idea !!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ringo View Post
          yah, I read someone here mention old axles as good round bar material.
          Was at the car boneyard the other day and stepping over old axles everywhere.
          I asked and they wanted $40 apiece for them, and they couldnt be identified as to truck fitment.
          ......well, so much for that idea !!!!
          Wowsers, thats a bit high.... yeah that shaft was so hard on the outside, it was like Superman's viagra. Tore up 3 pcs of carbide on it...
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

          Comment


          • #6
            I got some stuff from my cousin that passed, got all his old metal stuff.
            Got a piece of about 1" rod stock maybe 5 foot of it, looks like just hot rolled with the scale on it, but it ain't.
            Hard as you mention above until you get into it, then it is only tough.

            Comment


            • #7
              You can do that for a SB or Logan. I have a Logan and added under-carriage oiling years ago. It works very well, and gets rid of the gunky sludge that usually is on most home shop lathe beds. Here are some views of the original saddle as modified.

              You can see the oil port on left for the V-way, and the copper pipe on the right in this shot of the bottom.




              Detail of the copper pipe. The scraped "ramp" is important, it gets the oil to go under the saddle, instead of being scraped off as it might otherwise be.




              The topside showing gits cups. On the next saddle, I moved them to the tailstock side to keep them out of the swarf. They worked better as shown in the picture here, but are still adequate.

              CNC machines only go through the motions

              Comment


              • #8
                When we did repairs on the shafts and bushes of the museum's Smart & Brown model A apron, the oil pump in the apron also got overhauled. This is a simple cam operated plunger operated when the saddle is moved. It oils the gears and bearings and also the cross slide and saddle.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I chose this method as seen here on the forum so I can't take credit for the design. The material is just some vinyl plastic about .300 thick. The press in gits have about .005 interference fit in the plastic. I put small circular (paper punched) pieces of 100 mesh brass screen in the oilers to preclude any fines from going in with the oil. 2-3 drops and the ways are coated bigtime. I made four of these for the sadde.


                  Click image for larger version

Name:	tf3.jpg
Views:	133
Size:	365.0 KB
ID:	1881267Click image for larger version

Name:	tf3.jpg
Views:	129
Size:	365.0 KB
ID:	1881268
                  Last edited by I make chips; 06-14-2020, 10:26 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I can see your oilers, IMC, you haven't knocked them off yet?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by old mart View Post
                      I can see your oilers, IMC, you haven't knocked them off yet?
                      Ya just have to be a bit careful pulling big chips off.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A few years back I added 4 Gits cups to the saddle of my 9" S.B. after seeing a post about someone doing that and I am very happy with the results.Tailstocks likely would benefit from such an addition, too. It's strange it wasn't a factory install since it's not hard nor complicated to do.
                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                          A few years back I added 4 Gits cups to the saddle of my 9" S.B. after seeing a post about someone doing that and I am very happy with the results.Tailstocks likely would benefit from such an addition, too. It's strange it wasn't a factory install since it's not hard nor complicated to do.
                          Very true, I think the reason why they didn't do it at the factory is simply because of cost: these were cheap machines made to a popular price point -- in their day, same as the little 7x lathes today, And the fact they were cranking them out by the tens of thousands for the war effort. So they saved wherever they could, such as casting the half nut lever all in one piece with barely any finishing for example. Ditto the reversing and back gear levers.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I added GITs cups to the saddle of my Atlas 618, the carriage handwheel and half nuts shaft and to the tailstock. For the carriage and tailstock I milled out simple grooves with a small ball nose endmill (1/16?) and had the oil cup empty into one of those channels. One each side for the carriage and one for the tailstock, with a cross hole drilled from one side to the other. Also added felt wipers. Seems to get oil where it's needed and it's easy to wipe off after each use.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X