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  • #31
    If it is a tiny bit too large, tap it with a hammer or squeeze it gently with a vice (parallel to the hex flats) and you should be able to get contact on 2 sides.
    Or take a piece of round just smaller than the recess and carefully file a slot until it fits the flats. That should at least get you something to measure. If your smallest needle file is still a bit too thick, grind one side to thin it.
    Is it sufficiently tight that a pair of tweezers (with the ends ground to suit and held tight/shut with perhaps small vice grips) won't turn the screw out? I have some tiny hemostats, but even if I ground the tips, I doubt they would work.
    Location: North Central Texas

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    • #32
      To measure you could attach with some tape 2 small pieces of piano wire or something similar to the calipers and reach inside the recess. You could even flatten the wire a little with a hammer.
      Helder Ferreira
      Setubal, Portugal

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      • #33
        I've learned to try not and say anything with certainty but I think the hex shaft is not 2mm nor 1.27mm (0.050"). I purchased another 1.27mm cap screw today (meaning the hex is 1.27") turned it down to fit the bore but it doesn't work. So, for my last shot for now, I ordered a set screw M3x0.5mm 16mm from Mc-Master today. It has a 3mm diameter too so it should fit in the bore without machining. It take a 1.5 allen head wrench. I figured since the 2mm seems to spin and the 1.27mm seems to small, the 1.5mm is the best shot. We'll find out soon.

        Attached Files

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        • #34
          Getting an accurate measure? I doubt that the fuzzy photos in some of the posts above will cut it. You need a sharp image to get a good measure using photography.

          I would make a mold with clay or better yet, one of the commercial molding compounds: A flexible molding compound will help in getting an accurate impression as it can be stretched while pulling it off but it will return to the actual size after that. Add a small piece of wood/plastic/metal to the back of that molding compound before it sets to help keep the dimensions constant. Then make a replica with either plaster or a pour-able plastic. Trim the surrounding material from around the hex and then just measure it. Don't forget to take the shrink/expansion factor of both the molding compound and the plaster or plastic into account.

          https://www.alumilite.com/products/silicones/

          https://www.alumilite.com/products/resins/

          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

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          • #35
            Well if it matters to anyone, the set screw I ordered from McMaster-Carr worked perfectly (M3x0.5mmx16mm long ). So the hex is 1.5mm. Keep in mind that I also went to ACE Hardware local to me but they didn't have it, that's why I ordered it. I made my purchase at McMaster simply because the drawing confirmed the hex was 1.5mm (as the image I posted before confirms). I've also seen them on Amazon in a small quantity. You can easily grip the set screw with your fingers so you don't need to make a handle for it (which would be very easy to make).

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