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  • Bented
    replied
    Build a simple toggle press, only 4 or 5 moving parts.
    Like so.

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Selection of nibblers.

    The black one is a "legitimate" Adel that will do 16 ga if your grip is strong, the small silver one is a Radio Shack that I'd not try that with. The bottom one is a nice hand version of the top one, made in England (Monodex). There are identical hand ones made in France.

    As for power types, the top one is an HF copy of a "real" one. There is also a style that has a small round punch and die that will cut "partial moon" pieces about 2mm diameter and can be guided around most shapes. You do have to grind out the irregularities with that type.

    I have the 2 lower ones. The lower one has the nasty habit of biting my hand with the tip of the handle
    ​​

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Ian B View Post
    Paul A, you mention Greenlee punches. I've used round ones, but how do you align the two halves of a square / rectangular punch? Ian
    They have keyways.

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  • CCWKen
    replied
    Oh man, I've got some 1/2" square holes to punch in some new tractor fenders. About the only thing I have with a large enough throat is my hydraulic press. Alignment is the biggest problem when doing that. I've got all manner of punches including an OBI but can't get deep enough into the fenders. I was gong to make a pull-through (like the knock-outs) but I'm out of heat treating gas. I'll try my press alignment but I may be ordering a knock-out by tonight.

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  • lugnut
    replied
    Darryl, after reading your need for a sheet metal punch and all the responses, I made a search on Amazon.com for "Sheet Metal Punches" and there are like 10 pages of different types of punches. Maybe you could get some good ideas of what you might build for your shop. Good luck.

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  • Ian B
    replied
    Paul A, you mention Greenlee punches. I've used round ones, but how do you align the two halves of a square / rectangular punch? Ian

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  • darryl
    replied
    I have a table in the shop with a reciprocating tool mounted in it. Currently it's sporting a carbide tipped blade, 5 or 6 teeth per inch. Can't recall what I last used that for, but maybe that machine should become a filing machine. As far as I know, none of those reciprocating tools (Sawzall, etc) have a kick function though. That's what makes the Bosch so good, in part at least. Does any filing machine have that?

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    [QUOTE=darryl;n1881790]When I woke up this morning I had an image in my head of what might be called a die filer. I make one hole and just file the rest out- with a machine instead of by hand. Today I'm going to have to file these out 'cause I don't think I have an option right now.

    Depending how many your doing Die Filer works pretty slick,not for production like Punchs would be.I don't use mine a lot but it does jobs in the shop nothing else can do,It's a keeper.

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  • darryl
    replied
    That looks like a tool for working with stove pipes.

    Those other nibblers- I'll have to see if I can find the 'good' one- the Adel is interesting. I have the Rad Shack model- and I have broken the tip on it once. The replacement tip seems to be holding- last project for that was some stainless, which it struggled with a bit but didn't break. I won't even touch 16 ga with it, not in steel anyway.

    The punch idea is still stewing away in the mind- after the job at hand for it has been done and the pieces painted and baking in the oven as we speak. I picked up a couple more sticks of hss- I'm going to give the built-up die a try. After what seemed like an hour, I have four grind marks started. I'm sure by tomorrow or the next day I'll have the pieces parted off-

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  • 754
    replied
    Here is Click image for larger version

Name:	20200617_154856.jpg
Views:	143
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ID:	1881842 a nibbler i have, it has a crimper on the side. Not sure what it was used for.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    The Bosch is a great saw.

    Never saw a "saw blade" such as you describe, though. You might be able to make one.........

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  • darryl
    replied
    Now I'm green. I used a few Greenlee punches long ago- they just worked like they were supposed to.

    After I got through with looking for punches, etc today, I went into the shop and marked out the rest of the holes I needed. Used a step drill to get out to 7/16, then used the jigsaw to carve out the rest of the material. I'm constantly amazed how well this Bosch jigsaw works. As long as you have the material backed up well enough, you can do a good job of carving sheet metal. My thought was that with a slightly thicker blade the thing would act like a filer- and you would choose a tpi to suit the thickness of material. I think I have a 24 tpi blade on there now, and it eats the metal quite well- with the help of the kick function also. I think all it needs is a special blade that carves equally well on both sides as well as the front. Even just a curve across the front of the teeth would do it.

    So that's it- the special blade which is a cross between a jig saw blade and a file.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied

    Working in electronics, I have made many panels with different size and shape holes for various components. Over the years I have obtained a fairly good collection of Greenlee chassis punches that have proved very valuable for this kind of work. Many here have heard of the Greenlee knockout punches and they do make about six sizes of round punches specifically for that purpose. But knockout punches are only the very smallest part of the Greenlee punch line and the general line is called "chassis punches".

    Greenlee and others make a very large line of chassis punches that in addition to round ones includes squares, rectangles, internal and external keys, Dees, and even at least one double Dee. You can even buy punches that are made for the popular D-subminiature shaped connectors in all of their sizes (DA, DB, DC, DD, and DE) and I would not be surprised if they make punches for other specific connectors. All of these punches do not need any kind of press: they are activated by a screw and nut. They will work on steel sheets up to around a 16 or 14 gauge and aluminum up to about 1/8".

    These Greenlee and other brands of punches are somewhat expensive if you are going to have a large collection as they can cost from around $40 for the small, round ones up to several hundred dollars for larger or more unique shapes. I was able to use the search on E-bay to alert me when used punches were up for sale and I purchased several lots with 8 to 12 punches in them at one price. That held the cost of individual punches down. They are easy to sharpen so I had them in almost new condition within an hour or so of opening the box. And after sharpening them, I sold off the duplicates in individual sales, again on E-bay, and almost broke even on the collection. I have dozens of them and overall they cost less than $100.

    By the way, I even have some metric sizes in that collection.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Selection of nibblers.

    The black one is a "legitimate" Adel that will do 16 ga if your grip is strong, the small silver one is a Radio Shack that I'd not try that with. The bottom one is a nice hand version of the top one, made in England (Monodex). There are identical hand ones made in France.

    As for power types, the top one is an HF copy of a "real" one. There is also a style that has a small round punch and die that will cut "partial moon" pieces about 2mm diameter and can be guided around most shapes. You do have to grind out the irregularities with that type.

    Leave a comment:


  • darryl
    replied
    There's another idea- hmm.

    I checked out some of my sockets. A few are good brands, probably decent steel. All have holes that are roughly 10 thou or so larger than the tool bit- probably not close enough for a good cut. I'm going to go back to KMS and see what other hss pieces they have. I'm sure I'll be able to assemble something using jb weld- then surround the structure with regular steel to help hold it all together. The way my press platen is made it will be easy to align the die and bolt it down. The ram structure is guided already, so there is little side play there. I should be ok for alignment. When I built the ram guides, I made sure I could bolt custom press tooling to it easily, so I should have no problem mounting the square punch.

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