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5914 cross slide gib - need to machine if not available new

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  • 5914 cross slide gib - need to machine if not available new

    ​ Double posted to the Clausing IO group.

    My 5914 lathe had a 1/8 inch thick steel strip (plus two jack screws) instead of a cross slide gib when I bought the lathe. I added two more jack screws and have used the lathe like this for the past 15+ yrs. Hokey and marginally functional. Along the way I bought a used cross slide gib that had the narrow portion broken off to have as a pattern if I needed to make my own. I tried to install the broken gib as is but the short end drops out when the cross slide is advanced so that the cross slide extends past the carriage. So tomorrow I will contact Clausing to see if they currently have this part available and what it might cost.

    If not, I need to make one but I don't have a surface grinder. I have the ability to set up and mill the taper. My thought is that if the backside of the gib has a milled surface it should not be a major issue. I could lap the gib mating surface to the carriage. If I go this route, the material to use comes into question. If I use grey cast iron, I can attach the stock to a magnetic chuck - problem is the only chuck I have is a 9 inch round one and the gib is about 10 inches long - guess I could bond some extensions to the chuck to provide a backing surface. What about a gib made from either bearing bronze or brass? For that I would need to clamp the stock outboard of the ends of the gib length - what are the odds that the material will bow as it is being machined? Max gib thickness is 0.250 inch.

    I am assuming that trying to silver solder or braze the broken gib has no chance of ending up flat.

    Click image for larger version

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    Metro Detroit

  • #2
    Is the gib parallel or tapered .
    my buddy has a broken one and I suggested this.. drill a hole like 3/8 from broken ends on each piece. Slot from hole towards break, each piece.
    now make a piece that looks a bit like a dumbbell round each end just under hole size, with a flat piece in the middle, just under slot size.
    now push the broken pieces together, the file and fit the dumbbell key till you can tap it in place.. lots of filling, but it should work.

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    • #3
      754: Gib is tapered. I need to think about your suggestion a bit - seems almost as time consuming as making a new one.
      Metro Detroit

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      • #4
        I thought you had said, you felt it was longer than your equipment would handle.
        His was too...20 or 22 inches and we had a 18 inch surface grinder. his was off a mill, 3 pces, broke where holesbwent thru it. He thought he could maybe weld or braze it, I thought he would turn it into a pretzel that we could no longer measure off of . So I suggested a cold method.
        it still sits unfixed,

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        • #5
          Make one out of brass or bronze, it will be flexible enough not to need any lapping, the gib screws will hold it well.

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          • #6
            If you have the ends silver solder is pretty strong. It's not like the loads on a gib are high. And you can pretty easily see if you create a high spot at a bad spot and dress that spot down so it is in line with the portion you need. So I'd say that repairing the original with silver solder is very much an option.

            The bigger question is if you have the screw for the other end. I see the one sticking out but not the other. Although I guess a screw is easy enough to make....

            Along that line but with no heat would be 754's idea of the metal working equivalent of a butterfly key seen in wood working to stabilize a split. If the ends are big enough and fit firmly I think a fix like that could be an option. If smaller then perhaps an adaptation of this idea but where you make up a new end that extends onto the other which you machine to accept the new tail and attach the two with a combination of two small riveted pins and industrial adhesive. The pins being as much to ensure alignment as they are for mechanical holding since the adhesive these days is pretty darn strong.

            Options for this would depend on the size of the parts through the broken area.

            Another option is to simply finish what you started with an extra screw or two. Those original two screws were intended as locking screws only. The previous owner's adaptation and you adding two more screws has almost finished the conversion from tapered gib to screw adjustable gib. The only downside I see for this setup is that you don't have an adjuster right at the ends of the ways. So the thin gib is able to flex at the ends and not give you quite as nice a range of support as you could have. So one option would be to finish the conversion by adding an additional gib screw at end with the tool post or possibly both ends to provide better end to end support for the thin gib.

            Or if the new tapered gib is available and not too expensive just get a new one like you're thinking.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #7
              So I contacted Clausing this morning and the tapered gib is still available and in stock. I decided to try to repair before buying new since I had little to loose and knowing a new one was a phone call away. Was out of 45% silver solder so I brazed it. After cleaning the surfaces it was just amazing how long the flames of oil burning off of the gib remained - even after I moved the torch away. The pcs slipped a bit while brazing and the gib was curved in the plan view so I had to grind and file the edge. The vertical pic is the stationary side and the horizontal pic is of the sliding side that contacts the carriage. There is a bit of a bow in the gib but I expect that to flatten out in place. So for about 1.5 hrs of my time and a minuscule amount of gas (used a jewelers torch), I avoided spending $181 +shipping and tax. As I take a lunch break the cross slide is reinstalled.

              Click image for larger version

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              Metro Detroit

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              • #8
                can we get some photos of the gib? I'm wondering how it could be tapered because of the nature of the gib adjustments - taper gibs are usually adjusted from the ends not bolts/pins to the side.

                straight is easy to make new, tapered not much worse. I've never ground one, would recommend stay away from lapping. I've always milled and scraped them. You can do the same with blue and smooth files in a pinch.

                The problem with brazing is you can really nasty hard spots that you can scrape through
                Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-20-2020, 06:32 AM.
                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                • #9
                  The first post had images of the broken gib and the 7th post had images of the repaired and blue'd gib - at least I can see them here - I'll have to log in and check when I get home to see if the images show up on another machine
                  Metro Detroit

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                  • #10
                    For me the first post only showed the actual compound with the screws showing. Just two little black x's for the other two.

                    Anyway, good to read that you got the gib repaired.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Yes only saw the compound . I did tell my buddy with the mill, if he can contain the pieces in three on his mill it may work, I think he has part of the gib in there and does some light milling.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aribert View Post
                        The first post had images of the broken gib and the 7th post had images of the repaired and blue'd gib - at least I can see them here - I'll have to log in and check when I get home to see if the images show up on another machine
                        I can see the photos in post 7, but we'd cross posted....I hadn't them seen when i wrote #8.
                        Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-20-2020, 06:31 AM.
                        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                        • #13
                          Turns out that I can not see the two images of the gibs now that I am using a different machine. So I'll try to upload again - mainly as a test to see if I have the uploading of images down.

                          Here is what I started with: 1/8 inch thick steel shim that was in place of the cross slide gib and the broken cross slide gib that I bought to use as a pattern. Click image for larger version

Name:	gib and shim.jpg
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ID:	1882165 Here is another view of the steel shim (machined with an axe it would appear) and the broken gib: Click image for larger version

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                          Metro Detroit

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                            can we get some photos of the gib? I'm wondering how it could be tapered because of the nature of the gib adjustments - taper gibs are usually adjusted from the ends not bolts/pins to the side.

                            straight is easy to make new, tapered not much worse. I've never ground one, would recommend stay from lapping. I've always milled and scraped them. You do the same blue and smooth files in a pinch.

                            The problem with brazing is you can really nasty hard spots that you can scrape through
                            As McGyver says don't lap the gib. That might be why it broke in the first place - too much sticktion. I'd round off a file end and put a bunch of scrapes in that gib so that it holds some oil and doesn't stick to the way.
                            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                            Monarch 10EE 1942

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                            • #15
                              Lapping the fixed side should be fine. But I agree that you want some measure of oil retention flaking on the other side.

                              The bigger question is why the old tapered gib broke like that. And in fact if there isn't a piece missing off the other end as well. I see a rather jagged end in the picture. You may not be out of the woods yet.

                              On the flat gibs I think you got that one from the same axe murderer that did the gibs on some of my old machines. I recall strips that had the same chopped looking notches. How something so basic could be butchered in such a way makes one shake their head.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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