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Dura-Bar vs Versa-Bar

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  • Dura-Bar vs Versa-Bar

    I am actually doing research for a job interview with Dura-Bar and trying to get a little input from those more knowledgeable than me on what might be the core differences between these two companies. It appears for continuous cast-iron, Dura-Bar has 80% plus of the market share but what are the reasons why someone would choose versa bar other than possibly just less expensive. Any thoughts on either of these two companies is greatly appreciated as I do my research.

  • #2
    Dura-bar certainly has the name recognition. If the two products are at all similar, smaller/mid-size shops will likely buy on price, all else being equal. There isn't any other reason.
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 06-22-2020, 08:18 PM. Reason: clarity

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    • #3
      Too much harassment over at Practical Machinist?

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      • #4
        What would you expect from "machinists"? Nobody LIKES to machine cast iron and few have a say on material. Machinists take it up the arse from management and engineers. Better to present the question(s) to an engineer site where the specifications begin. Management deals with cost and profit.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by KMoffett View Post
          Too much harassment over at Practical Machinist?
          They ran him out of town on a rail. I hope that broken piece of dura-bar didn't leave slivers.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
            What would you expect from "machinists"? Nobody LIKES to machine cast iron and few have a say on material..
            Durabar machines like butter. Stunning results, and no mess. It's not your grandad's cast iron. I love it.
            Last edited by lakeside53; 06-23-2020, 01:20 AM.

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            • #7
              Nobody LIKES to machine cast iron
              I love it also. But then, I suppose I'm "nobody".
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Glug View Post

                They ran him out of town on a rail. I hope that broken piece of dura-bar didn't leave slivers.
                Nice to see that we are being just a welcoming here.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mickeyf View Post

                  I love it also. But then, I suppose I'm "nobody".
                  me to, so easy to machine. I did 8 4" bushings recently, bored from solid and that for me was a lot of cast iron. It was enough quantity that the black power was a bit of pain, but boring with a .125" depth of cut and nice little chips flying made it so seem so much easier than many steels

                  As for the OP's Q, aren't they are two brands, not types of metal?

                  edit, ok,. you're not looking for machining advice. I have no insights to either company.
                  Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-23-2020, 08:44 AM.
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                  • #10
                    I love cast iron as long as my machine tool is completely covered so I don't have to clean up the mess later

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                    • #11
                      Of course it's easy to machine. I've even machined barbell weights made of the worst possible waste products. What I was referring to was the clean up. If you LOVE that, you're demented.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                        Of course it's easy to machine. I've even machined barbell weights made of the worst possible waste products. What I was referring to was the clean up. If you LOVE that, you're demented.
                        I have no problem with doing the cleanup -- not because I love cleaning, I don't. I have no problem doing the cleanup, because I love my lathe. Spent a lot of money on it, too.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                          Of course it's easy to machine. I've even machined barbell weights made of the worst possible waste products. What I was referring to was the clean up. If you LOVE that, you're demented.
                          I guessing you have never machined Durabar. I use the 40ksi and 80ksi products, and it does not produce the "dust and grit" of crappy cast iron. On my mill I get perfect chips that are little curls, and similarly on my lathe. Vacs up nicely.

                          As for "messes" (cleanup), the worst in my shop is machining PVDF and/or many other plastics, and for metal... wads of aluminum chips caked on with coolant or light oils. Then there is stainless needle swarf/chips...
                          Last edited by lakeside53; 06-23-2020, 10:55 AM.

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                          • #14
                            I would guess that the Versa Bar would be cheaper because it doesn't have the name recognition, and therefor maybe an easier sell to smaller shops. Especially if they'll do smaller quantities and try to make up on volume.

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                            • #15
                              If I was going for a job interview, I would never make any mention of a competitors products.

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