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OT - "Brass" hose fitting warning

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  • OT - "Brass" hose fitting warning

    Just a "heads up" warning. I had a "brass" garden hose fitting fail the other night - pump woke me up at 3AM. Basically, it just failed and the hose disconnected from the real brass plumbing it was connected to. No harm done, it was outside. But if it had been inside - say supplying a clothes washer - with nobody home quite a different outcome would be possible. It turns out that the fitting was brass plated aluminum - which apparently corrodes quite nicely when in the presence of our well water. I think I purchased it from a big box store - found another in my horde of spare parts.



  • #2
    Did It say Brass or AL. Brass on the packaging?
    From the website:
    • Easily repair or replace the female threaded end of 5/8 in. hoses
    • Crush resistant metal construction
    • Stainless steel worm gear clamps
    • Works well with high water pressure
    • Easy to install
    • Heavy-duty metal construction lasts season-after-season

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by rwnash View Post
      Just a "heads up" warning. I had a "brass" garden hose fitting fail the other night - pump woke me up at 3AM. Basically, it just failed and the hose disconnected from the real brass plumbing it was connected to. No harm done, it was outside. But if it had been inside - say supplying a clothes washer - with nobody home quite a different outcome would be possible. It turns out that the fitting was brass plated aluminum - which apparently corrodes quite nicely when in the presence of our well water. I think I purchased it from a big box store - found another in my horde of spare parts.

      I do not believe those are brass, only 'brass' plated. I had a few of those and they look like plated pot metal. The cheapest of the cheap now for most home centers. How many 'seasons' did it last? Looks like you only get two from the package

      Comment


      • #4
        It seems that it should not be extremely difficult to discover before you buy.

        Plated brass looks different from solid. You will not see machining marks, nor will you see the rough surface of cast metal. The outside may be brushed, but the inside of the fitting is likely to be a giveaway as to what it is.

        Also, brass is heavy, a "brass" item that does not feel heavy is probably not brass. The "pot metal" (probably in truth one of several known die casting alloys) is reasonably heavy, but not like brass.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          Also, brass is heavy, a "brass" item that does not feel heavy is probably not brass. The "pot metal" (probably in truth one of several known die casting alloys) is reasonably heavy, but not like brass.
          I was recently fooled by some "brass" thumb screws, seems like getting actual brass is not so easy these days. At least not in the common hardware stores. My method for telling Genuine Brass is to look at the price... it will *always* be more than anything else with the possible exception of polished stainless fasteners.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
            . . .You will not see machining marks, nor will you see the rough surface of cast metal. . .
            And, you usually will see molding flash at the half-way point and poorly formed threads. Most of the chinese garbage isn't even brass plated, it just has some kind of 'too bright' brass colored coating. Complete trash.
            Southwest Utah

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            • #7
              This reminds me of the "brass" brush 6" grinding wheel I bought at Horror Freight. It was just plated. But nowhere on the package was that disclosed. A magnet confirmed it. The thing is, someone could ruin something by not knowing that critical detail.

              Maybe it is a feature, because you can use a magnet to help locate and remove the wires from flesh?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Glug View Post
                This reminds me of the "brass" brush 6" grinding wheel I bought at Horror Freight. It was just plated. But nowhere on the package was that disclosed. A magnet confirmed it. The thing is, someone could ruin something by not knowing that critical detail.

                Maybe it is a feature, because you can use a magnet to help locate and remove the wires from flesh?
                You would think they could get nailed for deceptive advertising on that one. I know I would be tempted....
                As it is, I've long since decided to never shop there again. Total waste of time and money.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes, it has gotten quite difficult to find anything other than brass color coated aluminum or pot metal hose ends. They are so light it is obvious that they are not brass.
                  Fortunately, Tractor Supply has real brass ones for a good price. Last time I needed one, I bought an extra 4 each of male and female ends.
                  Location: North Central Texas

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                  • #10
                    I bought one of those "brass" hose fittings...yep they are aluminum with brass colored coating on them. Look "pretty", but they are junk and brittle.
                    Brass is heavy. If it isn't heavy, it isn't brass.
                    S E Michigan

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                    • #11
                      I wonder if it was aluminium anodised and dyed gold? Very thin anodising will not give much corrosion resistance. The cheap zinc alloys are often flash coated with some pretty colour.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by OaklandGB View Post
                        I bought one of those "brass" hose fittings...yep they are aluminum with brass colored coating on them. Look "pretty", but they are junk and brittle.
                        Brass is heavy. If it isn't heavy, it isn't brass.
                        I always go by the price, real brass is a lot more. Going by the weight is kind of difficult when you are buying very small screws in single quantities.

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                        • #13
                          Another thing with brass substitute that comes to mind are drain rods. In the UK, and possibly every where else in the world, we have bundles of drain rods which used to be bamboo, but are now polypropylene about 3 feet long which screw together using coarse threaded brass ferrules. I had a set of cheap ones, and half of the ferrules broke when pushing the rods round a tight bend. The "brass" was plated zinc. When the drain was clear, (on a Sunday afternoon, of course), the rods went in the bin. I have had a set with proper brass ferrules in the garage now for 9 years and haven't used them yet.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "Drain rods"? What are drain rods?

                            Oh, never mind:

                            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drain_rods

                            https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...mageBasicHover

                            They do not look very practical. Only work on straight runs of pipe. A snake will go around corners.



                            Originally posted by old mart View Post
                            Another thing with brass substitute that comes to mind are drain rods. In the UK, and possibly every where else in the world, we have bundles of drain rods which used to be bamboo, but are now polypropylene about 3 feet long which screw together using coarse threaded brass ferrules. I had a set of cheap ones, and half of the ferrules broke when pushing the rods round a tight bend. The "brass" was plated zinc. When the drain was clear, (on a Sunday afternoon, of course), the rods went in the bin. I have had a set with proper brass ferrules in the garage now for 9 years and haven't used them yet.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            Make it fit.
                            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Drain rods have only been used for about two hundred years, before that, open ditches. Same rods could be used by substituting business end with a brush which is then used to sweep chimneys, a multi purpose tool but ruined the trade of sending little boys up chimneys to do the same job. Early example of technology driving redundancy.

                              Regards Ian.
                              You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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