Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT - "Brass" hose fitting warning

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Very cool, thanks for the info. I have used 3/4" PEX crimps before, which is a GREAT solution as there are no sharp edges, but this hose is a bit too fat for that. Looks like there are all sorts of DIY solutions for the wire clamp idea. A section of heat-shrink tubing over it to protect us from the wire ends would be the crowning touch. Looks like I have a small project now!

    Originally posted by lynnl View Post

    "...Any ideas?" Yes indeed, Anton. Sir, you need the handy, dandy Clamp Tite tool; a device that, along with a spool of 304 stainless wire will fix you right up. Furthermore, while the one shown is a commercial item, it makes a really nice little quick machining project, which many here undertook several years back, and like myself can attest it works really well for your exact purpose.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NXVnmMjFk4

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

      I think you're in the vast minority in that opinion.

      It's true that the makers did cheap out, such as the fact that Milwaukee power tools are total garbage nowadays -- guess where they're made?

      That wasn't the case 30 years ago. I remember being able to buy a TV that was made in Ohio and would last 20 years BTW with little or no service. Ditto for GM cars with an annual tune-up and 4 oil changes per yr. Back when american workers could afford to buy stuff that was made in america because all their jobs were in america making the products they were buying.

      The only thing that has changed is where the money is going, and how fast.
      Dude, American cars, just like British cars 30-40-50 years ago, may have had engines we could work on ourselves and be reliable, but they would be rotted out and rusted through before they were 10 years old.
      As for tv's, my whole adult like has been spent watching Japanese and Korean tv's, and they lasted pretty much forever.
      Lets get this straight re offshore manufacture, not just in the US but pretty much the whole of the West, excepting Germany who have always had their heads screwed on right, from the top of govt down to the punter in the street.
      One word and its called GREED. Shareholder GREED.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post

        Dude, American cars, just like British cars 30-40-50 years ago, may have had engines we could work on ourselves and be reliable, but they would be rotted out and rusted through before they were 10 years old.
        As for tv's, my whole adult like has been spent watching Japanese and Korean tv's, and they lasted pretty much forever.
        Lets get this straight re offshore manufacture, not just in the US but pretty much the whole of the West, excepting Germany who have always had their heads screwed on right, from the top of govt down to the punter in the street.
        One word and its called GREED. Shareholder GREED.
        AMEN I agree very much regarding GREED. It's what is ruining everything. However I didn't want to go that far in posting it because of the forum rules about politics. Many would regard me as a bit of a oddball --

        Yeah, most of the cars were complete rust buckets by the time they were 15 yrs old, in my experience. (we use tens of salt on the roads here) BUT the mechanicals were simply brilliant. Rugged, simple, and dependable. I grew up watching various brands of TV that were all made in USA back in the 60's and 70's and those TV's did indeed last (average) for decades. It wasn't until the 80's that you really saw the Japanese and Taiwanese take over everything in consumer electronics.

        Comment


        • #34
          Good Morning,

          I did not think I'd create a thread with thirty posts with my simple observation yesterday! To answer a couple of questions raised above: 1. Nothing on the label of the new part in my picture described the material, after the failure I took a file and "think" I discovered aluminum. 2. I have found copper plated aluminum wire in a few things I have scrapped out, probably for corrosion protection.

          I'll admit it was my error in purchasing/using the faulty part. I should have noticed it was not as heavy as true brass. But, it can be a little difficult to examine a packaged part and determine the density of the basic material. A purchaser should be able to trust that the part will work - sadly that is no longer true.

          The new part did come from Home Depot and was manufactured overseas. However, I don't blame the country of manufacture - I think that responsibility lies with those that write the specifications. We have all seen good "American" brand names purchased and run into the ground in the name of "efficiency. " Hopefully things will improve - but I doubt it.

          Whit Nash

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by rwnash View Post
            Good Morning,


            The new part did come from Home Depot and was manufactured overseas. However, I don't blame the country of manufacture - I think that responsibility lies with those that write the specifications. We have all seen good "American" brand names purchased and run into the ground in the name of "efficiency. " Hopefully things will improve - but I doubt it.

            Whit Nash
            No, blame the purchasing people of HD in Hotlanta, Ga., for contracting to purchase the cheapest possible items. The quality of many of the HD items has sunk to levels that rival Horrible Freight. If you want solid brass hose fittings, plumbing still has them although they are now a lead free alloy.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

              No, blame the purchasing people of HD in Hotlanta, Ga., for contracting to purchase the cheapest possible items. The quality of many of the HD items has sunk to levels that rival Horrible Freight. If you want solid brass hose fittings, plumbing still has them although they are now a lead free alloy.
              Nearly everything in HD's plumbing dept is pure ****. Go to Lowe's, they are a bit better, but keep a lookout, they might decide to "compete".

              If you buy a lock from HD, expect it to fail soon, and don't bother calling a locksmith to deal with it, they won't even work on those.

              Even the lumber is crap..... go to Menard's if you have them, the lumber is better. If you can go to a decent lumberyard, better still.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                Nearly everything in HD's plumbing dept is pure ****. Go to Lowe's, they are a bit better, but keep a lookout, they might decide to "compete".

                If you buy a lock from HD, expect it to fail soon, and don't bother calling a locksmith to deal with it, they won't even work on those.

                Even the lumber is crap..... go to Menard's if you have them, the lumber is better. If you can go to a decent lumberyard, better still.
                What brand of Brass compression, insert, etc, fittings will I find at Lowes? HD sells Watts brand.
                Marvelous Marv Ellison formerly of HD and JC Penney is now the Lowes CEO, employees and customers alike can expect an ass reaming.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Quite a coincidence this, I've just been working on repairing hoses at my place. I bought solid brass repair sets off eBay, took over a month to get here from China.
                  https://www.ebay.com/itm/Brass-Garde...72.m2749.l2649

                  Cost me $13.82 for 3 sets (male and female).

                  I hate using hose clamps, so I've made some S/S sleeves kind of like those used on hydraulic hose fittings.

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	WP_20200629_19_41_03_Pro[1].jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.53 MB ID:	1884013
                  It's all mind over matter.
                  If you don't mind, it don't matter.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post
                    I hate using hose clamps, so I've made some S/S sleeves kind of like those used on hydraulic hose fittings.

                    Click image for larger version Name:	WP_20200629_19_41_03_Pro[1].jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.53 MB ID:	1884013
                    So what are you doing to squeeze or crimp the sleeves? Is there something more than what meets the eye in the picture? The sleeve looks like it's merely slipped on over the hose.
                    Last edited by lynnl; 06-29-2020, 11:16 PM.
                    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by lynnl View Post

                      So what are you doing to squeeze or crimp the sleeves? Is there something more than what meets the eye in the picture? The sleeve looks like it's merely slipped on over the hose.
                      The id of the sleeve is a very close slip fit over the unexpanded hose. It has a shallow 4 tpi thread (spiral groove) cut in the id. The sleeve is slipped over the hose and back a couple of inches from the end. The fitting is inserted into the hose, which expands the od. The sleeve is then "screwed" back over the expanded section and flush to the end, compressing the hose over the barb.
                      It's all mind over matter.
                      If you don't mind, it don't matter.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X