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EVER have a bar hanging out of a lathe spindle, get away on you.?.Windmill !

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  • #16
    Good One ! šŸ˜€
    Green Bay, WI

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    • #17
      Be extremely careful with stock sticking out too far. I investigated a fatal incident where stock sticking out the rear of a CNC lathe spindle whipped. The guy was found with his arm missing and he'd bled to death. No one saw what happened and there was no video. Best theory was that he tried to "catch" the stock and stop the whipping. The worst part was that it occurred on Christmas Eve and the guy was alone in the shop.

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      • #18
        Iā€™m glad Iā€™m not the only one to do this. Mine was just 1/4ā€ aluminum but it bent nearly 90 degrees and slapped my few week old VFD enough to end its life. Glad I got the cheap one from Amazon!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by rklopp View Post
          Be extremely careful with stock sticking out too far. I investigated a fatal incident where stock sticking out the rear of a CNC lathe spindle whipped. The guy was found with his arm missing and he'd bled to death. No one saw what happened and there was no video. Best theory was that he tried to "catch" the stock and stop the whipping. The worst part was that it occurred on Christmas Eve and the guy was alone in the shop.
          Given how hard the short length of fairly small size drill rod hit me I'm not at all surprised at this story if a larger piece were involved. And the effect of that video with the long shaft in the machine run by the guy with the pony tail could easily have ended in much the same manner if anyone had been in the way.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #20
            It's hard to comprehend the amount of potential energy a moving mass represents. Several years back I was heavily into reading about the Civil War. I came across several accounts of soldiers losing arms or legs thinking they could stop a cannon ball rolling or bouncing along at what they mistakenly perceived to be a safe speed.
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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            • #21
              It takes remarkably little to keep it from whipping IF you don't let it start. When I needed to keep a long 1/2 inch bar from whipping I drilled through a 2x4 with a 5/8 bit and nailed a cross piece to it to make an upside down T shaped support. A C-clamp held the base to the bench. One support at the end of the bar and one half way were enough to keep it under control.

              Dan
              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

              Location: SF East Bay.

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              • #22
                Only one I ever had whip was a steering shaft from an old JD tractor, it was about 3/4" diameter and maybe 6 feet long. I knew not to turn it fast, I had the thing running 20 rpm, but it still whipped and bent.

                One neat setup I saw was a couple 30 gallon steel barrels with locking casters on the bottom and a piece of steel channel welded across the top to hold was was basically a lathe steady rest. The barrels were filled with sand and could be re positioned at will.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

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                • #23
                  Not that long ago ABOM79 had a video where he was turning a long piece of rod. His mill was lined up so that he could put a support for it on the mill table.

                  Yes, I oopsed a 6 foot piece of aluminum round bar once. I used to hang a plastic bucket on the free end of bar with a few tool holders in it, and let that rest on my tool cart. but I had the tool cart pulled out next to me that day because I was going to need several different tools on that job. One of them was a computer to order a new piece of bar. Now I use a V block on top of a stand.

                  Thank goodness for the foot brake.
                  Last edited by Bob La Londe; 06-27-2020, 08:41 PM.
                  *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                  • #24
                    :EVER have a bar hanging out of a lathe spindle, get away on you.?.Windmill !:

                    I have done that. JR




                    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                    • #25
                      Happened to me once- only once. I was removing the flux from a brazing rod as I needed the brass and that was the only source I could find. Not a big deal- put a hole in a piece of wood, and a scraper/cutter on the side- just advance it along the rod by hand as it worked. I elected to do the work off the lathe, so the rod was out the left side, and the flux could fall into the gears instead of on the ways where it would have been easier to clean up. Ha ha. I was running slow, but the moment the wood came off the rod, off it went. I was lucky, and yes I did nearly **** myself. I would have to say if this happens to you once, that will be the last time.

                      At one time I made a Tesla coil on a piece of 5 or 6 inch pvc pipe. I figured a good way to wind it would be to mount it in the lathe, run at a very slow speed, and just guide the wire on manually. But how to support the end of the pipe, which was twice as long as the lathe bed? I rigged up an outboard bearing hanging from the rafters above the lathe. The first time I fired it up, the pipe walked right off the chuck. At least I was paying attention. The positioning of the outboard bearing was quite critical. I ended up using a faceplate with a piece of mdf on it, turned to fit the ID of the plastic pipe, and put a few screws through the pipe and into the mdf to keep it in position.

                      I don't recall the rpm I used for that, but I know I used the slow speed attachment I made which can easily get me down to about 3 rpm- which is what I used to rotate the pipe after all the wire was on. This was to apply the resin over the windings in such a way that it wouldn't drip. The winding itself was done much faster than that, probably at about 30 rpm- and in reverse. You know, the way to make a chuck come unscrewed- but that didn't happen.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
                        Its called not planning ahead
                        Here is a job I had with a 12 foot 1-1/4" leadscrew running at 800 RPM
                        Those plastic blocks are screwed to the wood plank
                        works like a charm
                        Rich


                        Click image for larger version Name:	IMG_3708.JPG Views:	0 Size:	958.6 KB ID:	1883486
                        Nice Shop Rich, JR
                        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                          Nope. If it hangs out more than a few inches from the spindle, I rethink the setup.
                          Same here ! I never let anything hang out the left side of the spindle by more than 12" and that depends on R's and the dia. of the material. I have a bunch of plastic bushings I made that press into the left end of the spindle with various size holes through them to support the stock overhang and minimize the whip.

                          Sometimes I stuff some foam around the rod to keep it centered in the spindle.

                          JL.................

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by 754 View Post
                            Click image for larger version

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ID:	1883460 This one behind the tooling, started whipping on my buddy's 20 ich Standard Modern. I got it stopped pretty quick, but it was starting to pull out of the chuck , nearly right out of the jaws. You can see the rub marks from spindle as it was coming outward. ..1 inch round. Scary few seconds.
                            Was this hanging out the back or did it bend on the bed side?

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by challenger View Post

                              Was this hanging out the back or did it bend on the bed side?
                              The picture kind of throws me too. Looking at the jaw marks there isn't enough hanging out the bed side to whip and not enough on the other side to come out the end of the spindle, unless it was cut.
                              But I have to think, why would anyone have that much hanging out the bed side and why wouldn't they support it with the TS?

                              JL.................

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                              • #30
                                No one has talked about how someone was obviously video recording that machinist and waiting for the disaster to happen instead of going down there and stopping him in the first place. The camera moves and the focus changes. THAT person needs to be fired as well for knowingly risking lives and machinery.

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