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Grinding on horizontal mill?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

    Not true. Adam Booth commonly welded on the 20" pacemaker at work.
    -Of course there are exceptions. There's always exceptions. Years ago, over on PM, somebody posted some pics from an industrial auction showing a Bridgeport where somebody had sawed or torched the top of the column off, so they could mount a large, fixed, T-slot table to it, and bolted the head, spindle horizontal and pointing toward the table, on the bed.

    There were the usual cries of "how could they do that to such a fine machine?!?" but another poster pointed out that in that case, a well-used old Bridgeport might have cost at best two grand, but may have helped complete a tricky cut/alteration/repair to a large $100K part, or helped complete a six or seven seven-figure contract. After which the BP could be sold off for scrap, and the shop would still be considerable money ahead.

    But regardless, I know that none of the local oilfield-support shops would even consider welding anywhere near one of their lathes, and would only grind, as I said, if no other option was available.

    And yes, toolpost grinders are definitely a thing- I have and have used one, myself. But I'm also meticulous about cleaning the machine afterward, and generally treat it as a case of I'll only do it if I absolutely have to.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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    • #47
      You know, it seems like a lot of the arguments presented against the perfectly reasonable statement of "lathe toolpost grinders exist and are fairly common, such an operation isnt really that different than grinding on a mill, therefore its not too far fetched to wonder about it" have been "it works, but only if you do this, this and this and can cause damage if you dont take proper precautions and clean afterwards, so this is a bad thread", or "rahhh, not done in professional shops". I find that second one hilarious given were on The HOME SHOP machinist forum

      Yall born knowing everything or what? Seems to me this thread was started to find out what those things you need to do to prevent or mitigate the damage were. Where exactly is the harm if you know the risks, understand the achievable tolerances, and you decide you want to look further into something?

      First guy who invents a machine to yank the stick out of peoples asses could get rich off this forum alone...

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

        And yes, toolpost grinders are definitely a thing- I have and have used one, myself. But I'm also meticulous about cleaning the machine afterward, and generally treat it as a case of I'll only do it if I absolutely have to.

        Doc.
        imo, from a reasonable bit of grinder experience, grit is primary sprayed everywhere when dressing....while grinding wheel wear is very slow so most of what is coming off is chips. I try and contain the grit from dressing with a cardboard box and do have everything covered throughout. I 100% agree on all the precautions...but to get to my point, I think perhaps worse than grinding is sanding, using abrasive cloth. That crap, the abrasive, just sheds off the backing material.

        How many go to town to protect the lathe with sanding? i do, that little snow storm of grit will turn into a lapping paste on the ways and really accelerate wear. Everything gets covered in paper held down with pot magnets.

        It is true that in the home shop we occasionally have to do the unexpected , but offsetting that is that in the home shop we have the time and can be trusted to be very careful about protecting and cleaning the machine.

        I continue believe biggest challenges with the idea is the slow traverse from a feedscrew (granted, may be less of issue for a short workpiece) and the slow wheel speed
        Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-04-2020, 06:49 PM.
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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