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Bacon Grease for Cutting Oil?

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  • #16
    Well I use a wax toilet seal mixed with black cutting oil. Mixed to a peanut butter consistency. Works pretty good. John b.
    John b. SW Chicago burbs.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post

      Does that mean you can really Hog off alot of metal?
      Max.
      I tried bacon grease and got a lot of squealing
      Last edited by buffdan; 06-30-2020, 09:26 PM.

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      • #18
        There were a couple deep draw stamping dies that just wouldn’t remain in spec. until we added pure lard to the draw lube. It was only 10% or so of the lube by volume, but it made all the difference in the results.
        Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
        9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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        • #19
          I tried using vegetable oil once. It baked on just from the heat generated in cutting. It got into every crack that it could and I had to take things apart to clean them (3 jaw chuck, tool post, etc.) Clean up took hours. NEVER AGAIN! I haven't tried bacon grease, but I can only imagine the problems that would cause with insects and small critters getting into the shop. Somehow, I don't think I will even try it.

          Besides, if you have enough bacon grease to consider it for shop use, I strongly suggest that you and all your family members get a check-up from a good cardiologist. Don't be surprised if he sends you to a cutter.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          Make it fit.
          You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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          • #20
            Lard oil is nasty, smells bad, goes rancid and sticks to everything, there are 5 gallon pails of it where I work that is only used for drilling and tapping copper.

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            • #21
              Bacon Grease is totally acceptable under the following conditions;
              you are using a flat belt South Bend.
              your side hole on tail stock has white lead grease in it.
              your small Scriber is still in its place in your Starrett square from your combination set.
              your Machinery Handbook is 20th edition or older.
              you have an edition of Soth Bend,s How To Run A Lathe.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by john b View Post
                Well I use a wax toilet seal mixed with black cutting oil. Mixed to a peanut butter consistency. Works pretty good. John b.
                How did it taste?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by 754 View Post
                  Bacon Grease is totally acceptable under the following conditions;
                  you are using a flat belt South Bend.
                  your side hole on tail stock has white lead grease in it.
                  your small Scriber is still in its place in your Starrett square from your combination set.
                  your Machinery Handbook is 20th edition or older.
                  you have an edition of Soth Bend,s How To Run A Lathe.
                  What if you just like bacon a good deal?

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                  • #24
                    I had to single point thread a large piece of 316 stainless a few years ago and could not get an insert or a piece of hss to cut well, i kept getting bad chatter. The last thing I tried was some bacon grease, and it worked. I tried about 10 diff cutting oils, bacon grease was the only one that worked.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Blazemaster83 View Post
                      I had to single point thread a large piece of 316 stainless a few years ago and could not get an insert or a piece of hss to cut well, i kept getting bad chatter. The last thing I tried was some bacon grease, and it worked. I tried about 10 diff cutting oils, bacon grease was the only one that worked.
                      I've heard, but cannot verify, that the reason it works so well in certain conditions is that it runs towards heat unlike most other oils.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        I tried using vegetable oil once. It baked on just from the heat generated in cutting. It got into every crack that it could and I had to take things apart to clean them (3 jaw chuck, tool post, etc.) Clean up took hours. NEVER AGAIN! I haven't tried bacon grease, but I can only imagine the problems that would cause with insects and small critters getting into the shop. Somehow, I don't think I will even try it.

                        Besides, if you have enough bacon grease to consider it for shop use, I strongly suggest that you and all your family members get a check-up from a good cardiologist. Don't be surprised if he sends you to a cutter.
                        I assume I'm doing something wrong before I make that much heat. If you are baking on cooking oil, then your black sulfer cutting oil would be just a pure joy to smell.
                        If you are cutting that hot, what were the dimensions when it cooled off?
                        You doing high speed CNC or home shop lathe stuff?

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                        • #27
                          Geez guys,
                          just buy the proper stuff, its not gonna break the bank. A litre of cutting fluid a year in the home shop.
                          I mean, whats with cooking oil and bacon fat on my precision machine tool?
                          Its like the guys asking can they substitute 20/50 motor oil for way oil because they've got a pail of it under the bench.
                          Sure it'll work, but its not correct nor the best for the job.
                          Buy some way oil for $5 a litre.
                          Ditto the correct cutting fluid for the job.
                          FFS.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post
                            Geez guys,
                            just buy the proper stuff, its not gonna break the bank. A litre of cutting fluid a year in the home shop.
                            I mean, whats with cooking oil and bacon fat on my precision machine tool?
                            Its like the guys asking can they substitute 20/50 motor oil for way oil because they've got a pail of it under the bench.
                            Sure it'll work, but its not correct nor the best for the job.
                            Buy some way oil for $5 a litre.
                            Ditto the correct cutting fluid for the job.
                            FFS.
                            You have a true point, but some people actually *are* financially broke recently, and they did use lard a hundred years ago when there wasn't much else available.

                            Way oil in litre sizes is $9.50 plus shipping for me. I tend to use a lot of it, everything around and under the lathe is soaked. The dark sulfurized cutting oil I use, is the same stuff plumbers use in their pipe threading machines. $7 per litre. I cannot guarantee a time when I will be able to buy more, money is very sporadic at best for me. I'll be thankful if I can get more oil before the end of the year. This is in the USA, mind.

                            However, I found that parting off in a deep groove, it seems to go better with the surplus 90-wt gear oil I have on hand -- a mistaken purchase years ago finally has a use! My theory being the heavier gear oil clings better into the sides of the groove and stays around long enough for the parting blade.

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                            • #29
                              Many years ago I took a materials class and needed to do an experimental project that demonstrated material testing. I chose cutting compounds and performed two basic tests: extreme pressure testing using an Almen-Weiland lubricant tester (http://www.klueber.co.kr/index/image...nt-testing.pdf scroll down to page 41) and a tapping torque test. Bacon grease was heated in a beaker to drive off water, then filtered to remove organic debris, and placed into the tester. It was not the best EP lube, but I dramatically increased its EP lubrication by adding some flowers of sulfur and retesting. This combination was the second best material. The only material that was better was the 1970's cutting compound that was mostly trichlor solvent. I also did a torque test tapping 1/2" - 13 holes in steel. Again, bacon with sulfur performed very well; it was the second lowest torque with trichlor being the lowest.

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                              • #30
                                For me, there is only 1 place around town that has the dark cutting oil, and that is one place I try to avoid shopping.
                                Besides, dark cutting oil gets its smell onto my clothes, and wafts to the house and the SWMBO doesn't like that.
                                It's easier to use cooking oil than to listen to the wife complain

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