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AK. Boomer. Q. Crush washer on a 2014 toyota oil pan washer?

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  • AK. Boomer. Q. Crush washer on a 2014 toyota oil pan washer?

    I am writing here because the internet is full of all types of info.

    Boomer has always been known to get around an engine or two.

    The reason I ask is I did the fist oil change on my new car and there was no washer there. Every car I have ever owned use washers on the pan plug?

    I didnt put one in there. I did go to the auto parts place and buy many of the plastic boxes of washers they had. I was NOT gonna call toyota and ask how much they wanted for one. I still have to eat!

    Pulled the plug out carefully cause I dont fish for plugs.

    No washer in the oil drain pan or the oil pan (they get stuck).

    So I buttoned her up with the oil you folks said to use and no leaks.

    Just wondering Boomer? Do you see any cars without some type of washer between the plug and pan? It is a very solid and flat bung hole landing. The Bolt was just as nice.

    I am hoping I didnt F up an go without a washer. Chit! Have not warmed it up yet, did fire it up and sure as bean that pig takes 7.5qts. Dip stick looked good.

    Ill warm it tomorrow.

    Imagine if I have to drain my new oil just to put a washer in. Welcome to my garage.

    So yeah, Boomer? JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  • #2
    My Prius has no washer

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RB211 View Post
      My Prius has no washer
      Thank you. JR
      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

      Comment


      • #4
        Some cars have a tapered plug thread, and I would clean the plug thread when the oil is draining and coat it with a gasket compound. Don't worry about the female thread being still oily. Even if the thread is parallel, I would still put the compound on it to give it a better seal and reduce the chances of it unscrewing.

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        • #5
          You don't have to drain the oil to put on a new gasket/washer/seal or whatever you want to call it. Remove plug, put your thumb over the hole, stopping the oil flow. Put seal on plug. Reinstall. I've done it, and only lost a little oil, maybe half a cup. I recommend a washer with a O ring moulded on the ID. But if it doesn't leak, don't fix it.
          I cut it off twice; it's still too short
          Oregon, USA

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          • #6
            You'd want to be sure and have the oil fill cap and dip stick cap firmly in place to hold a vacuum in the system. It won't be perfect, but it'll help.
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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            • #7
              My 2012 chevrolet doesn't use a washer either -- the pan is cast alloy with a spot face for the plug flange to seat on. The threads are straight, not tapered. Seems to work OK. Never a leak.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                My 2012 chevrolet doesn't use a washer either -- the pan is cast alloy with a spot face for the plug flange to seat on. The threads are straight, not tapered. Seems to work OK. Never a leak.
                Yup I too have seen numerous cases much like this, also a few that were steel to steel sealing surfaces that used a hardened threaded steel insert in the pan and a very soft drain plug with no washer.

                Lots of times I have also seen drain plug washers on the first few oil changes stuck to the plug from paint.Sometimes you really have to take a good hard look to spot it, especially if it has a layer of oil on it. Perhaps it's still there?



                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                  ..........Imagine if I have to drain my new oil just to put a washer in. Welcome to my garage.

                  So yeah, Boomer? JR
                  You don't have to drain the oil to change the plug.

                  Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Willy View Post

                    Yup I too have seen numerous cases much like this, also a few that were steel to steel sealing surfaces that used a hardened threaded steel insert in the pan and a very soft drain plug with no washer.

                    Lots of times I have also seen drain plug washers on the first few oil changes stuck to the plug from paint.Sometimes you really have to take a good hard look to spot it, especially if it has a layer of oil on it. Perhaps it's still there?


                    Possible but not likely in my case. I replaced the OE drain plug because some uneducated former owner tried to cram a 1/2" wrench on it. The replacement plug has a magnetic tip (works great!) and no washer.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      Possible but not likely in my case. I replaced the OE drain plug because some uneducated former owner tried to cram a 1/2" wrench on it. The replacement plug has a magnetic tip (works great!) and no washer.
                      Yes I realize this didn't apply to you, it was aimed mainly at the OP, perhaps his washer was still stuck to the drain plug and he may have missed it.
                      I've seen some that were still firmly stuck there several years down the road from new. The paint can act like a pretty good adhesive once it's baked on, the washers can be surprisingly difficult to remove at times.
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post

                        Yes I realize this didn't apply to you, it was aimed mainly at the OP, perhaps his washer was still stuck to the drain plug and he may have missed it.
                        I've seen some that were still firmly stuck there several years down the road from new. The paint can act like a pretty good adhesive once it's baked on, the washers can be surprisingly difficult to remove at times.
                        I checked it real well and not on the bolt or the pan and this is the first oil change. JR

                        It doesn't leak, I just wanted to make sure I wasnt screwing up. Never thought about pulling the plug and using my thumb.

                        Thanks for all the info guys. JR
                        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm getting real homesick for my old 1970 Chevy Impala with the 396.... there never was any question about cars in those days, it was all kinda obvious. Stone hammer simple.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                            I'm getting real homesick for my old 1970 Chevy Impala with the 396.... there never was any question about cars in those days, it was all kinda obvious. Stone hammer simple.
                            Mine was an Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser Station Wagon with a 455. Station wagon cause you have to wagon yer fuel with you or be close to a Gas Station.

                            Oh weel, 300 bucks. All I had. JR
                            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              JR solly so late but sounds like it all worked out and you definitely made the right move passing on the plastic crap washers that have totally destroyed many an engine after they heat up - conform - lose tension and then fall out,,,
                              better to have a seeper/slight leak then to lose the whole kit and kaboodle,,,

                              as far as your set up, if it's steel on steel I don't like it and would just put in a copper or aluminum washer next go around (oil change) steel on steel can gall - even with oil right there - best to have a softer material interface, iv seen precision steel on aluminum case and sometimes seems acceptable,

                              also steel on steel but the plug has a built in O-ring interface, very nice, lots of choices but again good move staying away from plastic that can crack open or actually just plain melt.... hate to tell you where most come from and seems they just don't give a crap about what type of material they use...

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