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Tailstock Self-Centering Chuck Question - What can I use this for?

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  • Tailstock Self-Centering Chuck Question - What can I use this for?

    My lathe (Jet 1340) came with this nice Bison Tailstock Chuck. It's free spinning like a live center. Very nice, never used, but I can't even think of a setup where I'd use it? There is precious little that came from Poland about what its uses are. Does anyone have any experience with these?

    The YouTube guys are always looking for content subjects, maybe they should do a video on this kind of chuck.

  • #2
    1) grab a bar in the tailstock where there isnt a center present
    2) mount the id or od of a tube to do turn, thread, whatever on the od
    i think in time you will find this pretty handy. i always wanted one but never had a job come in that needed it.

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    • #3
      Useful for pipe/tubing. That chuck does look a bit humorous on that small of a tailstock barrel.
      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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      • #4
        Made for shafts without a center-drilled hole
        Also holding a Round or Hex Die for threading

        Rich
        Green Bay, WI

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        • #5
          That is nice, do you have both sets of jaws? I made one for the lathe with an 80mm three jaw chuck, but haven't had a use for it yet.
          The chuck comes off the back half and an er32 collet could also be used, or a 4 jaw independent.
          Last edited by old mart; 07-07-2020, 01:04 PM.

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          • #6
            I wish I had one of those when I was doing a lot of antique starter and generator rebuilds. Not many had a center drilling on the armatures. I fell back to my brass-jaw Jacobs No.100 chuck for those. Want to trade?

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            • #7
              I have never seen one of these Bison/Toolmex tailstock chucks before today, and another one comes up on ebay UK. It is 125mm with slot and tenon jaws with spares, an unknown Morse taper size, but looks large and it has an adaptor on it. Not a cheap price, though.

              https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Self-cent...QAAOSwS8he-I9q

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              • #8
                I saw a video once of a glass blowing lathe that had chucks on headstock and tailstock side too. It was used to make precise changes to the tubing for scientific purposes, but I don't recall if it was using a saw, grinder or flame.
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                Location: SF East Bay.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                  I wish I had one of those when I was doing a lot of antique starter and generator rebuilds. Not many had a center drilling on the armatures. I fell back to my brass-jaw Jacobs No.100 chuck for those. Want to trade?
                  I've seen something like that once, used to clean up the commutator of a starter. But in this case the chuck wasn't spinning. Instead, there was a ball bearing mounted on each jaw. Kind of a tailstock mounted steady rest.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by old mart View Post
                    That is nice, do you have both sets of jaws? I made one for the lathe with an 80mm three jaw chuck, but haven't had a use for it yet.
                    The chuck comes off the back half and an er32 collet could also be used, or a 4 jaw independent.
                    It did come with two sets of jaws. All the suggestions are appreciated - I'm already thinking of things to do with it.

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                    • #11
                      "I've seen something like that once, used to clean up the commutator of a starter. But in this case the chuck wasn't spinning. Instead, there was a ball bearing mounted on each jaw. Kind of a tailstock mounted steady rest." That's how the Jacobs 100 works except the jaws are brass. It doesn't spin itself. It doesn't have a key--You snug it up by hand and oil the shaft. The shaft spins in the brass jaws.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by danlb View Post
                        I saw a video once of a glass blowing lathe that had chucks on headstock and tailstock side too. It was used to make precise changes to the tubing for scientific purposes, but I don't recall if it was using a saw, grinder or flame.

                        Glass lathes have both chucks powered and synchronized.

                        -D
                        DZER

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                        • #13
                          Catching parts when using a cutoff tool?

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