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  • High speed quenching

    Knowing that steel ribbon can be made superior in magnetic properties if it's rapidly cooled makes me wonder about other materials too. I can just let my imagination go and say glass, or aluminum, or bismuth for that matter. Or carbon. Are there any useful properties that can be imparted to these other materials by rapid cooling?

    I just watched a very interesting vid on friction stir welding- probably what raised my interest in material properties again. I'll see if I can find it again- Fabrisonic I think was the name of the company.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    You learn something new every day! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNbQH8XBgxQ

    Thanks Darryl, that's *another* machine that I need...

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by darryl View Post
      Knowing that steel ribbon can be made superior in magnetic properties if it's rapidly cooled makes me wonder about other materials too. I can just let my imagination go and say glass, or aluminum, or bismuth for that matter. Or carbon. Are there any useful properties that can be imparted to these other materials by rapid cooling?

      I just watched a very interesting vid on friction stir welding- probably what raised my interest in material properties again. I'll see if I can find it again- Fabrisonic I think was the name of the company.
      Well, brass is annealed by quenching - just ask any reloaded.

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      • #4
        Maybe I'm wrong here, but over the years I've seen multiple sources that said it doesn't matter how fast brass is cooled; it will soften either way.
        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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        • #5
          Here's the URL to the vid I watched. https://youtu.be/hvM1zE7Zfh0
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            At uni I worked with a researcher who had a big metal wheel running in a bath of liquid N2 then poured molten materials onto the cold rim to make amorphous ie non crystaline material to look for high temperature superconductors. That was 40 years ago so they must have found them all by now surely.
            Quenching brass is to keep large crystal sizes that have grown when hot. When cold worked or cooled slowly the crystals break up and small crystal have more boundaries that inhibit deformation just like adding alloying elements to steel. Hence clockmakers hammer brass to make it into a spring.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Baz View Post
              ....
              Quenching brass is to keep large crystal sizes that have grown when hot. When cold worked or cooled slowly the crystals break up and small crystal have more boundaries that inhibit deformation just like adding alloying elements to steel. Hence clockmakers hammer brass to make it into a spring.
              So, are you saying that my statement above is wrong ...that brass does in fact anneal more completely when cooled quickly, than when cooled slowly? I ask, not to argue the point, but to learn what is the truth in the matter.
              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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              • #8
                Search the big G for amorphous metal. Not ready for the home shop however (-:

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by darryl View Post
                  Knowing that steel ribbon can be made superior in magnetic properties if it's rapidly cooled makes me wonder about other materials too. I can just let my imagination go and say glass, or aluminum, or bismuth for that matter. Or carbon. Are there any useful properties that can be imparted to these other materials by rapid cooling?

                  I just watched a very interesting vid on friction stir welding- probably what raised my interest in material properties again. I'll see if I can find it again- Fabrisonic I think was the name of the company.
                  Well heck yeah, I think you are on the mark Love the friction welding on the Propulsion tanks. Crasy stuff.

                  You can not determine the thickness of these materials with TV vidio imagery. That Chit is Thick!!

                  I like the Tech. JR
                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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