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Treadmill motor wiring

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  • #16
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Quick warning in general about using those cheap PWM generators to control speed with a PWM board (like the MC2100). A friend of mine didn't want to go the Arduino route, so he bought a $12 PWM generator off Amazon. Lasted a couple of days before he fried his MC2100 - no speed control, full speed all the time (which isn't fun on a 2x72 belt sander).
    Too bad you did not give him my email, the picmicro boards I put together have the 20hz PWM and Stop/Start signal.
    That board by the OP seems as though it is PWM as it only has two semi's compared to the SCR bridge type, and the large electrolytic's are another clue..
    Not familiar with that board, it may take some reverse-engineering to find out the nature of the signal from the original console, normally the elevate signal is totally separate and has no influence on the belt motor.
    OR obtain a used MC2100, they come up frequently, on my local classified used sale site many are a free take away for defunct/not working T.M.'s.
    Max.
    Last edited by MaxHeadRoom; 07-10-2020, 08:46 PM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post

      Too bad you did not give him my email, the picmicro boards I put together have the 20hz PWM and Stop/Start signal.
      That board by the OP seems as though it is PWM as it only has two semi's compared to the SCR bridge type, and the large electrolytic's are another clue..
      Not familiar with that board, it may take some reverse-engineering to find out the nature of the signal from the original console, normally the elevate signal is totally separate and has no influence on the belt motor.
      OR obtain a used MC2100, they come up frequently, on my local classified used sale site many are a free take away for defunct/not working T.M.'s.
      Max.
      I did and told him it was a great deal for a plug and play solution. Unfortunately he didn't listen to me and ended up spending $100 instead on a nice 5HP Baldor DC motor controller box <shrugs> Everybody has to learn their own way, right?

      Back to the OP - thanks for the pictures. The control board plugs into that big red "MAIN" connector and the small red "SPEED" connector is most likely a magnetic pickup sensor that measures speed of the front roller, for speed feedback control. My apologies for suggesting it is a simpler SCR type controller, now I can see that connector it's pretty clear (along with Max's more informed response above) that it's a PWM board. You'd need to find which of the pins of the MAIN connector are the PWM signal pins and then figure out the voltage and frequency needed.

      Or as ^ said, get an MC2100 and one of his PWM signal boards

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      • #18
        The easiest way to control a PM DC motor is to feed it from a DC variable power supply. Most people don't have one of those, and most of those supplies don't go anywhere near 90V anyway. The next easiest way is to get a single full wave rectifier (cheap) and connect its AC terminals to a variac and its DC terminals to your motor. You plug the variac into the wall and then you can smoothly run your motor through its entire working rpm range.

        I have taken apart several treadmills recently. None of them had connectors for a pot on the board. Yours doesn't seem to either.

        Where I live, 3 to 5 free treadmills appear on my local craigslist.

        metalmagpie

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        • #19
          I forgot about that safety factor in the design of treadmills. DO try running the pot to first one end of it's range and leave it there for a few seconds, then crank it up. If that does not work, try it at the other end.



          Originally posted by darryl View Post
          Maybe it's been suggested already, but most machines require that you have the pot down to zero for a few seconds before bringing it up slowly. Otherwise the motor would come on and run at whatever speed is dialled in- which is dangerous for the exercisee.

          The board appears to have 110 coming in, then through a bridge rectifier directly- which means no transformer required. I don't recall reading through this topic whether you tested the motor- that's pretty easy to do. Without it being connected to the board, temporarily short the motor wires, then turn the shaft by hand. Unshort the wires and turn by hand again. It should be harder to turn when the wires are shorted. The other way to do it is to connect 12 volts to the motor wires. It will turn- not quickly, but it will run on 12v.

          As far as the board, if it lights up it's getting power, and if the buttons seem to be doing something on screen, it's probably workable. Maybe it want's you to program it in some way before it will allow the belt to roll- a reasonable assumption. In most cases though, you'd be better off with a controller made for PM DC motors- some of the features available are very handy, but if you just want control of speed it should also be fairly cheap.

          You have to be careful to choose a controller that has its own power, unless you are comfortable to supply it with the voltage it wants. That one last shown needs up to 90 volts maximum, so how will you supply that?
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

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          • #20
            Yes, Fortunately the popular MC2100 versions do not require that, if you re-start at any level above zero RPM, it just ramps up automatically at a pre-defined rate until up to speed.
            Max.

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