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  • #31
    When I lived in Daytona Beach, FL. The Chamber of Commerce made all the Time/Temperature signs shut down when it got cold. They didn't want the tourists to know it can get cold even down there. Last year at the Olympics here in Salt Lake City, a woman from Moscow commented that it didn't get as cold there as it was here. As cold as it is in the Central and Eastern US it is unusually warm here. It's been getting over 50 deg. here, I won't complain, maybe get a tan.

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    • #32
      Well in Thunder Bay I think it got down to something like -25 or -29 C, -41 C or so with the wind. I am not used to it either way being from the west coast. I don't understand how people can put up with it. I never seen ice form on the inside of double pane windows before. Nor have I seen:

      - icicles hanging from exhaust pipes
      - Seen my exhaust form ice on my rear bumber
      - tire pressure drop about 10 psi
      - 5W/30 oil pour like thick glue (should have used 100 % Synthetic)
      - get into my truck then to have instant ice form on the inside of the windows from breathing
      - crazy people actually biking to school, and have ice form around their scarfs which covered their face. NUTS !

      Not for me. When school is done I am outa here. Yes I may be a wuss, but not that crazy!

      ------------------

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      • #33
        I have been in the northern plains, it gets cold there, but they know how to handle it. I am in Columbus, Ohio at the moment, and we got 5 inches (about 13cm)of snow since morning. Tomorrow morning it's suppose to be about 3 degreesF or about -16 dgereesC. This town will be paralized. I will be home making chips tomorrow.

        Jerry

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        • #34
          Too bad we can't collect import tarrifs on all that cold Canadian air.

          We could have had a budget surplus by now

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          • #35
            jfsmith where are you? I am in Lancaster.
            mark costello-Low speed steel

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            • #36
              Spin Doctor:
              I was in Superior and Deluth when it was -60F (without wind). What was truely pathetic was the guy from FL trying to start his car outside the hotel. I told him to give me his keys and I would start it for him. Walked out in a t-shirt and blue jeans, got in the car, got it started mdae sure it would stay that way and came back in. Bald tires and he drives into the snow belt - doh! And he thought I was crazy. Lake Superior does make it a little miserable there, but not too bad (worst part was listening to the "wind chill" stories).

              Coldest I was in was -76F with 50-60 MPH wind. Pants turned into a board the moment you went outside. That is frigging cold. Belts snapped off alternators, rads froze and split with the block heaters plugged in.

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              • #37
                Thrud,
                I was in Marshall Mn. after years ago, had some business with Schwan foods. It snowed so much and so hard that some houses dissapeared in the snow drifts. I am not sure how cold it was, but it was warm in their telecom room, where I spent a lot of time.
                I think people just don't know how to handle the cold and the snow. What ever happen to having your kit in your car? Doesn't anyone have chanines these days.

                Jerry

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                • #38
                  It made it all the way up to 35 degrees today, but going back down to the single numbers tommorow. Pellet stoves have been working overtime.

                  ------------------
                  Paul G.
                  Paul G.

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                  • #39
                    Ive been in -30f before not to bad its usually dry can take it aok but down here it gets to be 17or18f and 90%humidity in plain english cold and wet as a well diggers a--!!
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #40
                      Jerry
                      People die even on major highways in bad weather. Being ill prepared is the biggest cause. Even a 25 Mile trip can be a killer with the right conditions.

                      I remember a really bad storm about 1978 it took me 6 hours to drive 12 miles and the only way I could see past the wipers was with my roof rack lights on. 800,000 Cp and I could just barely see a few feet in front of the truck - white knuckle all the way. The wind nearly blew me off the highway...

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                      • #41
                        Speaking of being prepared, I once read of a rural mail carrier in the cold country (Montana I think it was) who always made a point of buying his new vehicles WITHOUT a heater. That was of course, to insure he'd always have with him adequate clothing, blankets, etc. to survive in case he got stranded.
                        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                        • #42
                          Thrud,
                          During the blizzard of 1978, I was stationed at Fort Campbell. I was a part of a training team for aerial rescue. I was called to the hangar and we would be flying into Ohio to drop off food and fuel to those those traped in their homes. From Cinncinnati to Columbus, we fought very strong winds, many times flying almost side ways. We filled that Huey with food packages and 5 gallon cans of fuel. We saw that people that were trapped on the interstate. We rescued motorist that were very bad off, took children to the hospital. After two days, the Ohio National Guard got their Huey's off the ground to do rescue work. We went back to hangar in Columbus, to get our orders to go home. We flew back to Campbell. Got out of the bird and was told we could take a couple days off. While I was home, I saw on the news that the Ohio National Guard got medals for their rescue efforts, we didn't even get a cup of coffee.
                          I saw how fast people could freeze in bad weather, how people couldn't drive in the weather, how people were never prepared for bad weather.
                          I have always had a weeks worth of food in the house, extra fuel for the car, a kersosene heater around, and one really good thing to have on hand, a case of toilet paper.
                          The one thing that I learned from the Boy Scouts and from the Army is to be prepared.
                          The moral of the story, is check your records, 6 months after this rescue mission, the Ohio National Guard awarded the pilot and crew of my Huey, the same state medal, but had to go thru their chain of command to get it us.

                          Jerry

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                          • #43
                            Hey Jason
                            are you at con college or at Lakehead? I have one more sesion at con college to go.I am guessing that if your on this BBS and at con college your in the Dorian building. If so don't you just love walking over to the caffeteria at lunch when It's -30 with the wind just sailing across the parking lot.

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