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Local Inventions of note.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
    Is this it? https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-89-96.../dp/B000HEKV1W

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris
    Yes that is it they call it rotator. I have one with a different brand and handle , not sure if it's maybe a knockoff ?
    I worked on a prototype of the end version head the 3/8 square is part of..

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
      No chance. They went blind.
      It was the wing sauce

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      • #18
        Aircraft engine preheater, patent # 5,337,729, 12 claims. Trade name Northern Companion Preheater. invented late 1980's, patented early 1990's. At the time it was the lightest aircraft engine preheater available (still might be). Sold patent to a local guy in 2001, it's still being manufactured in Alaska and marketed worldwide..

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        • #19
          I had one of those ratchet wrenches and it actually worked really well.

          Here in Hightstown, NJ the John Bull steam locomotive was the first commercial railroad in the US. I have 4 patents, a robotic watering machine for commercial greenhouses, a hose handling system for moving machines, a machine to tag plant containers, a paint scraper for removing bottom paint from boats. Lots of other inventions that weren't patented and the patents have all run out and the original machines are no longer in production, but a number of companies produce copies of some of them. I found out recently that one has been copied by at least 3 companies. Nothing earth shaking so I'll never be famous.

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          • #20
            Daniel Massey, and his son Hart (of Massey Ferguson fame) got his manufacturing start in my home town of Newcastle Ontario. They built hay rakes, and other implements there before moving bigger facilities in Toronto when Hart assumed control after Daniels death. I have a friend who has a cast iron "tractor" seat from one of those rakes, with the letters "Newcastle" and "the rake" in raised letters. A few years ago my Dad spotted one on a wall in Quebec somewhere on a trip east but was unable to convince the guy to sell it. I have a 9' steel roller I was told came from that factory as well, but have never been able to prove it, though I did find an early Massey catalog that depicts a spitting image of the one I own, but I'm pretty sure it was born in the early 1900's after they moved out of town. Either way it's still rolling lawns over 100 years later needs new bearing material though.....One of these days.....

            At the other end of town around the same time period (mid to late 1800's) Samuel Wilmot was "inventing" the modern fish hatchery in an attempt to save the dwindling Atlantic salmon population in lake Ontario. While he didn't invent the modern day fish hatchery, he was an early pioneer in the field and his efforts are still noticed today. I grew up fishing Wilmot creek (that ran beside his estate) and really took for granted how much of a great fishery it was (and is). Too crowded to get a spot along the banks now, but when we were kids it was wide open. Miss those days of the Salmon and Steelhead runs.

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            • #21
              The Middlesex Canal, one of the first big civil engineering projects in the US ran right behind our house. The engineers who learned on that job went on to build the Erie Canal which really opened up the center of the continent to transportation and trade.

              Claude Shannon, who invented information theory, which is one of the theoretical bases of computers and communications (such as the Internet) lived just down the road. He probably had one or two good ideas while taking a bath.

              Also I have about a dozen patents on networking (all assigned to employers of the time). Nothing really earthshaking, but still kinda neat and, last I heard, one or two are still in use in some switching equipment helping data move around the Internet.

              frank

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              • #22
                I will get more info on the rotary ratchet soon. I heard the guy 4 doors from me in the storage place was showing it to someone. It was then I remembered he has same last name as one of the group that invented it. At the time I worked on it, it was not fully on the market yet.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                  Daniel Massey, and his son Hart (of Massey Ferguson fame) got his manufacturing start in my home town of Newcastle Ontario. They built hay rakes, and other implements there before moving bigger facilities in Toronto when Hart assumed control after Daniels death. I have a friend who has a cast iron "tractor" seat from one of those rakes, with the letters "Newcastle" and "the rake" in raised letters. A few years ago my Dad spotted one on a wall in Quebec somewhere on a trip east but was unable to convince the guy to sell it. I have a 9' steel roller I was told came from that factory as well, but have never been able to prove it, though I did find an early Massey catalog that depicts a spitting image of the one I own, but I'm pretty sure it was born in the early 1900's after they moved out of town. Either way it's still rolling lawns over 100 years later needs new bearing material though.....One of these days.....

                  ...
                  The Canadian Massey's migrated north from New England some years after the American War of Independence.* (Some of my forebears did the same.) The Massey clan included the actor, Raymond Massey.

                  * Was the Massey clan loyalist?

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                  • #24
                    Well, since we're bragging. I designed the system, wrote the specialized computer code and managed the Appointment Scheduling System at the Cleveland Clinic back in the 80's. That system was responsible for all the out-patient appointments and the necessary labs. In addition, it was necessary to have the (then hard copy) charts and records at the scheduled appointment location such as clinic, room and/or doctor. The size of the Clinic back then was about like 10 of the largest VA hospitals combined. On a volume level, it was comparative to the flight schedules of all the major airlines combined. The system allowed a reservationist to search for the first available appointment by day, date, time, week day or month within a particular doctor or clinic (specialty). It was quite an advancement in scheduling technology at the time.

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                    • #25
                      maybe not "local", but my father developed voltaren.

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                      • #26
                        I drive down Parson road everyday on my way to work (or at least I did before I was moved offsite). Named for John T. Parsons, who developed numerical control (NC) for machine tools. The company went on to develop one of the first CAM systems and there are still a few shops around town using the old software from the 70s.
                        George
                        Traverse City, MI

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                        • #27
                          Dian, tell your dad "thanks" for us.

                          If we are doing software... Naw. too many inconsequential ones to mention.
                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                          Location: SF East Bay.

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                          • #28
                            Here in Connecticut?
                            Couple guys tried a few things but nothing ever really took off.
                            Len

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                            • #29
                              According to Wikipedia, Willis Carrier in Broolyn, N.Y. invented A.C. in 1902.

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                              • #30
                                No claim to fame personally, but one of my college room mates later married the daughter of the guy who invented the Bush Hog.
                                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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